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25 Local Warehouse Children's- Historical Fiction- U.S. 19th Century
2 Remote Warehouse Children's- Historical Fiction- Military and War

This title in other editions

A Ballad of the Civil War (Trophy Chapter Books)

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A Ballad of the Civil War (Trophy Chapter Books) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One0n The Morning Of August 24,1850, Tom Rigby woke early, then lay considering the day ahead. There was going to be a party on this, the ninth birthday of the Rigby twins.That's us, Tom thought comfortably. Jack and me. We're nine years old.It was to a big, "big party. Their mother had been planning it for ages.Friends and relations, neighbors from nearby plantations, would be arriving with their children, and with lots and lots of gifts. There would be, in Tom's opinion, too many gifts and too many grown-ups waiting to be thanked too much.Still, he thought, a party is a party and maybe it'll be fun.He yawned, smiled, looked over at Jack, sound asleep, gently snoring."Jack!" he yelled. "Wake up, wake up! We're nine years old today!""Call me when we're twenty," mumbled Jack, pulling a pillow over his head.Tom laughed, got washed and dressed, and bounded downstairs to the kitchen, where Roger, the butler, was polishing silver and Tulitha, the cook, was kneading spongy bread dough."Morning, Uncle Roger," said Tom. "Morning, Tulitha! That smells wonderful!"The cook continued her work in silence, but the butler smiled. "Morning to you, young Tom. Up betimes, as usual, I see.""Jack's asleep. He won't be nine years old for the first time in his life ever again. But he says we're to call him when we're twenty.""Can't wait to be all grown up and his own man, our Jack."Tom shrugged. "Far's I'm concerned, I'm my own man now. Where's Aaron?""Down to the quarter.""When'll he be back?""Won't be back."Tom scowled. "Uncle "Roger, quit funning. I don't like that.""Not funnin', Tom. Aaron's been sent to the quarter. For good and all.""What are you talking about? This's the birthday party day.Why's Aaron down there stead of up here?""Tom, don't devil me. The plain fact, no way 'round it, is that Aaron's stayin' in the quarter from now on."Tom stamped his foot. "That's crazy!""Call it anyway you wants, its a settled matter.""No, it ain't! Isn't! I'm going right down there and fetch him back home.""No, Tom! That's jes' what you won't do. You gonna leave well enough alone."Why? It isn't "well enough at all. It's "awful. So why should I leave it alone)""Because. That's why," said Roger, polishing a heavy ladle harder, as if trying to erase its intricate design.Tulitha plumped the mound of dough in a large bowl, covered it with a damp linen cloth, snorted a half laugh, and walked out to the back porch, letting the door slam behind her.Tom jerked the butler's arm. "Because? What kind of answer is because?"Roger drew a deep breath, put the ladle aside. At length he met Tom's eyes. "The because is because your daddy say it"s time that Aaron go back where he belong.""He belongs here. He belongs with Jack and me. You know that. He's" Tom hesitated, then said, "He"s ours."Aaron, five years older than the twins, had been given to them as a christening present by Colonel Galpin, their mother's brother. Raised along with them by Aunty Bess, Aaron' lived with her off the kitchen but spent most of his days with Jack and Tom, protecting and guiding them like an older brother, sharing their lives in all ways.In almost all ways."A right bright darky, Mr. Rigby frequently said. "Watches out for the boys better'n any dog would.""What's Aaron gone and done, Uncle Roger?" Tom asked. "Why's he belong down there all of a sudden like that?"Your daddy say he's got uppity.""Uppity?" Tom said. "Uppitywas a bad thing to be said of any slave. "How's he got uppity? He's just the same as always.""Your daddy say he's too free with you boys, actin' like there's no difference between you and him --""What's wrong with that? We haven't ever made a difference between him and us. Why should we?""Sometimes, Tom," Roger said impatiently, "you act like you still four years old. You know your daddy don't hold with white boys bein' friends with coloreds.""That's for — for "other people. Not Aaron.""When your daddy say you 'n'Jack is too old now fer that kinda minglin', that's the end on it. Aaron's outgrowed his place with you.""That's a dumb stupid crazy idea. He's practically our brother. I'm going to pull Jack out of bed right now, an' we'll go fetch him back.""I tell you no!""And I say yes." Tom started off."You want Aaron should be sold off?"Tom turned back. "Sold off! Daddy would never do that. Never!"Roger began counting spoons."He wouldn't . . . would he?" Tom asked miserably."You go 'gainst him in this, he might conclude to put Aaron in his pocket."That slaves were sold — putting money in their owners' pockets — and that they were bought and traded, was something Tom knew. Uncle Roger himself had come to the household long ago, in payment of gambling debts owed to their father.But never till now had Tom thought that plantation business applied to Aaron. Aaron wasn't just anybody. Aaron was ... he was theirs, his and Jack's."Uncle Roger!" he said triumphantly. "Aaron belongs to me and Jack. Daddy can't send him down to the quarter without even asking us. Can he?"Can't he?""Well, I'm going to see Aunty Bess, that's what I'm going to do.""Do that."Roger picked up a tureen and examined itclosely, as if Tom had already left.

Synopsis:

Twin brothers, sons of a plantation owner, share everything--except their different beliefs about slavery. As the political tensions rise in the South, they are caught between their passions for their causes and their love for one another. When the Civil War begins, the twins both go to war--to fight each other. Mary Stolz captures the spirit of the times in this emotionally-charged story of two brothers growing irrevocably apart.

Synopsis:

A Brother's War

Tom Rigby didn't think that anything could ever come between him and his twin, Jack. But things begin to change when Tom learns that they are not allowed to play with their friend Aaron anymore because he's a slave. Tom is upset, but Jack doesn't seem to care. All Jack cares about is playing soldier.
Eleven years later, when war breaks out, Jack joins the Confederation army. But Tom can't bring himself to fight for a cause he doesn't believe in — slavery. So Tom rides north to join the Union army — even though he knows he may one day have to face his brother on the battlefield.

About the Author

Mary Stolz, winner of the 1993 Kerlan Award for the body of her work, is the author of dozens of books that are perennial favorites of young readers, including two Newbery Honor Books, Belling the Tiger, illustrated by Beni Montresor, and The Noonday Friends. She lives on the Gulf Coast of Florida.

Sergio Martinez was born and lives in Mexico City. He illustrated Weapons & Warfare by Milton Meltzer. His paintings have been exhibited in galleries around the world.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780064420884
Author:
Martinez, Sergio
Author:
Martinez, Sergio
Author:
by Mary Stolz and Sergio Martinez
Publisher:
HarperCollins
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Juvenile literature
Subject:
Historical - United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Historical - Military & Wars
Subject:
Civil war, 1861-1865
Subject:
Brothers
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Fiction - Historical
Subject:
Readers - Chapter Books
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. 19th Century
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Trophy Chapter Books Paperback
Publication Date:
19980808
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 2 to 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
7.62x5.20x.16 in. .11 lbs.
Age Level:
07-10

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Children's » Historical Fiction » Military and War
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 19th Century

A Ballad of the Civil War (Trophy Chapter Books) New Trade Paper
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Product details 64 pages HarperTrophy - English 9780064420884 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Twin brothers, sons of a plantation owner, share everything--except their different beliefs about slavery. As the political tensions rise in the South, they are caught between their passions for their causes and their love for one another. When the Civil War begins, the twins both go to war--to fight each other. Mary Stolz captures the spirit of the times in this emotionally-charged story of two brothers growing irrevocably apart.

"Synopsis" by ,

A Brother's War

Tom Rigby didn't think that anything could ever come between him and his twin, Jack. But things begin to change when Tom learns that they are not allowed to play with their friend Aaron anymore because he's a slave. Tom is upset, but Jack doesn't seem to care. All Jack cares about is playing soldier.
Eleven years later, when war breaks out, Jack joins the Confederation army. But Tom can't bring himself to fight for a cause he doesn't believe in — slavery. So Tom rides north to join the Union army — even though he knows he may one day have to face his brother on the battlefield.

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