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Lucky Jim

by

Lucky Jim Cover

ISBN13: 9780140186307
ISBN10: 0140186301
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 3 left in stock at $6.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"In That Uncertain Feeling (1955), one of Kingsley Amis's lesser novels, the narrator, John Lewis, is watching some young women play tennis, and decides to examine himself on an important question: "Why did I like women's breasts so much? I was clear on why I liked them, thanks, but why did I like them so much?" It's surprising, in a way, that Amis didn't capitalize those last words, as he was apt to do when he required any savage or emotional emphasis in his correspondence with Philip Larkin. (George Du Maurier's Trilby, for example, "might be a lot worse," he wrote. "AND A LOT BETTER.") But he seldom permitted any such heaviness to pervade his novels, and it is this very delicacy that allows one to answer the sensitive and dangerous question not Why is Lucky Jim funny? (daunting enough as an essay topic) but Why is it so funny?..." Christopher Hitchens, Atlantic Monthly (read the entire Atlantic review)

Review:

"Dixon makes little dents in the smug fabric of hypocritical, humbugging, classbound British society...Amis caught the mood of post-war restiveness in a book which, though socially significant, was, and still is, extremely funny." Anthony Burgess

Review:

"A classic comic novel, a seminal campus novel, and a novel which seized and expressed the mood of those who came of age in the 1950s. But there is more to it than that . . . Its university setting functions primarily as the epitome of a stuffy, provincial bourgeois world into which the hero is promoted by education, and against whose values and codes he rebels, at first inwardly and at last outwardly." David Lodge

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Gypsi, June 6, 2010 (view all comments by Gypsi)
I'm so glad I picked this book up. It is delightfully funny in a rather understated way. The characters become real enough to care about during the course of the story. The more improbable the situations, the more believable they are. This is a book you'll want to read again!
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780140186307
Introduction:
Lodge, David
Author:
Lodge, David
Author:
Amis, Kingsley
Publisher:
Penguin Classics
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
British and irish fiction (fictional works by
Subject:
College teachers
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
College teachers - England
Copyright:
Series:
Penguin Twentieth Century Classics
Series Volume:
map MF-1469-B
Publication Date:
19930901
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
7.71x5.04x.63 in. .43 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Lucky Jim Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Penguin Books - English 9780140186307 Reviews:
"Review" by , "In That Uncertain Feeling (1955), one of Kingsley Amis's lesser novels, the narrator, John Lewis, is watching some young women play tennis, and decides to examine himself on an important question: "Why did I like women's breasts so much? I was clear on why I liked them, thanks, but why did I like them so much?" It's surprising, in a way, that Amis didn't capitalize those last words, as he was apt to do when he required any savage or emotional emphasis in his correspondence with Philip Larkin. (George Du Maurier's Trilby, for example, "might be a lot worse," he wrote. "AND A LOT BETTER.") But he seldom permitted any such heaviness to pervade his novels, and it is this very delicacy that allows one to answer the sensitive and dangerous question not Why is Lucky Jim funny? (daunting enough as an essay topic) but Why is it so funny?..." (read the entire Atlantic review)
"Review" by , "Dixon makes little dents in the smug fabric of hypocritical, humbugging, classbound British society...Amis caught the mood of post-war restiveness in a book which, though socially significant, was, and still is, extremely funny."
"Review" by , "A classic comic novel, a seminal campus novel, and a novel which seized and expressed the mood of those who came of age in the 1950s. But there is more to it than that . . . Its university setting functions primarily as the epitome of a stuffy, provincial bourgeois world into which the hero is promoted by education, and against whose values and codes he rebels, at first inwardly and at last outwardly."
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