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Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement (Pivotal Moments in American History)

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Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement (Pivotal Moments in American History) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In a quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement and change the course of history. The implications of that remarkable convention would be felt around the world and indeed are still being felt today.

In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Woman's Rights Movement, the latest contribution to Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments in American History series, Sally McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840-1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the lasting and transformative effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time--and destined to be thus regarded by the future historian." In this lively and warmly written study, Sally McMillen may well be the future historian Anthony was hoping to find.

A vibrant portrait of a major turning point in American women's history, and in human history, this book is essential reading for anyone wishing to fully understand the origins of the woman's rights movement.

Review:

"McMillen, who chairs the history department at Davidson College, presents a fine history of the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, which galvanized the women's movement through the remainder of the 19th century and also affected concurrent struggles for temperance, abolition and educational reform. Narrowing her focus to four suffragists — Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony and Lucy Stone — McMillen nimbly weaves their stories with the larger narrative of reform. After a splendid introductory chapter that outlines the legal injustices most women suffered (typically, they could not vote, hold property or receive equal pay for their work), McMillen describes the convention itself, about which we know relatively little (Stanton gave it just two sentences in her mammoth memoir) and then traces its unexpectedly weighty impact on reformers through the decades. She does an outstanding job of discussing how religion functioned as both an impetus and an obstacle to reform, and pays particular attention to how the women's movement broke apart during Reconstruction because of internal bickering, racism and class divisions. This is not a revisionist work or a substantial challenge to the conventional historiography of suffrage, but a well-written and cogent synthesis accessible to the general reader while remaining firmly grounded in primary sources. 20 b&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement. McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced.

Synopsis:

In the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the women's rights movement and change the course of history. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Sally McMillen reveals, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840 to 1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Mott, Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the far-reaching effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time."

About the Author

Sally McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History and Department Chair at Davidson College. She is the author of Motherhood in the Old South and Southern Women: Black and White in the Old South. She lives in Davidson, North Carolina.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. Separate Spheres: Law, Faith, Tradition

2. Fashioning a Better World

3. Seneca Falls

4. The Woman's Movement Begins, 1850 - 1860

5. War, Disillusionment, Division

6. Friction and Reunification, 1870 - 1890

Epilogue: "Make the World Better"

Appendices

The 1848 Declaration of Rights and Sentiments

"Solitude of Self," Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Endnotes

Index

Acknowledgments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195182651
Author:
Mcmillen, Sally
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Author:
null, Sally
Author:
McMillen, Sally Gregory
Author:
McMillen, Sally
Subject:
Women's Studies - History
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Middle Atlantic
Subject:
Feminism
Subject:
History
Subject:
History, Other | History of Women
Subject:
Feminism -- United States -- History.
Subject:
History, American | Women
Copyright:
Series:
Pivotal Moments in American History
Publication Date:
20080211
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
28 ht
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
6.4 x 9.3 x 1.2 in 1.4 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » 1800 to 1920
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies

Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement (Pivotal Moments in American History) Used Hardcover
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$9.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195182651 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "McMillen, who chairs the history department at Davidson College, presents a fine history of the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, which galvanized the women's movement through the remainder of the 19th century and also affected concurrent struggles for temperance, abolition and educational reform. Narrowing her focus to four suffragists — Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony and Lucy Stone — McMillen nimbly weaves their stories with the larger narrative of reform. After a splendid introductory chapter that outlines the legal injustices most women suffered (typically, they could not vote, hold property or receive equal pay for their work), McMillen describes the convention itself, about which we know relatively little (Stanton gave it just two sentences in her mammoth memoir) and then traces its unexpectedly weighty impact on reformers through the decades. She does an outstanding job of discussing how religion functioned as both an impetus and an obstacle to reform, and pays particular attention to how the women's movement broke apart during Reconstruction because of internal bickering, racism and class divisions. This is not a revisionist work or a substantial challenge to the conventional historiography of suffrage, but a well-written and cogent synthesis accessible to the general reader while remaining firmly grounded in primary sources. 20 b&w illus." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement. McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced.
"Synopsis" by , In the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the women's rights movement and change the course of history. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Sally McMillen reveals, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840 to 1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Mott, Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the far-reaching effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time."

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