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Public Speaking Handbook (2ND 07 - Old Edition)

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Public Speaking Handbook (2ND 07 - Old Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Public Speaking Handbook, 2nd edition

Steven A. Beebe, Texas State University - San Marcos

Susan J. Beebe, Texas State University - San Marcos

 

Adapted from the authors' top-selling public speaking text, Public Speaking Handbook, Second Edition, provides a unique, audience-centered approach in a student-friendly reference format, allowing students to access information quickly and easily.

 

Public Speaking Handbook brings theory and practice together in an understandable and applicable manner. Its distinctive and popular approach emphasizes the importance of analyzing and considering the audience at every point along the way. This model of public speaking serves as a foundation as the text guides students through the step-by-step process of public speaking, focusing their attention on the importance and dynamics of diverse audiences, and narrowing the gap between the classroom and the real world.

 

 

New to the Second Edition

 

­       A boxed feature called “How To” provides step-by-step instructions for completing the steps in the speech preparation process.

­       Updated examples and new research applications to public speaking in every chapter.

­       New sample speeches, both at the ends of selected chapters and in Appendix D

­       Integrated examples of developing a speech step-by-step.

­       More emphasis on rhetorical analysis in Chapter 5 to help students develop their critical thinking skills.

­       Expanded discussion of using humor in Chapter 21, Special-Occasion Speaking.

­       New tips and techniques to help students achieve their speaking goals by editing out superfluous and unnecessary elements.

­       TECHNOLOGY ADVANTAGE

MySpeechLab is a state-of-the-art, interactive and instructive solution for introductory public speaking. Designed to be used as a supplement to a traditional lecture course, or to completely administer an online course, MySpeechLab combines an E-book, multimedia, video clips, speech preparation activities, research support, tests and quizzes to completely engage students. (See Valuepack listings for package ISBNs.)

 

About the Authors

 

Steve A. Beebe and Susan J. Beebe have authored several best-selling communication texts, including their widely used public speaking text. Praised for their accessible content, student-friendly writing style, and audience-centered focus, these experienced authors help make Public Speaking Handbook the best of its kind available today.

Synopsis:

Key features for this edition include:

  • Easy-to-use, reference format enables readers to look up and use information quickly. Tabbed dividers enable readers to access chapters quickly, while the spiral binding makes working with the book easy.
  • Tabbed sections offer "At a Glance" outlines that highlight chapter content for easy reference.
  • Unique, audience-centered approach, introduced in the Beebes' prior edition, emphasizes the importance of considering the audience at all stages of the public speaking process. The audience-centered model, displayed on each tabbed divider, reminds readers of the steps involved in speech preparation and delivery, while simultaneously emphasizing the ongoing process of analyzing and adapting to listeners.
  • Brief "Quick Check" summaries throughout the book recap key information for quick review.
  • A Question of Ethics boxes (throughout the book) invite students to consider ethical issues as they prepare and deliver their presentations, including the tradition of free speech in a democratic society, plagiarism, honesty in communication, the legitimate use of evidence and reasoning, and the need for tolerance.
  • Extensive coverage of overcoming speech anxiety (Ch. 2) includes applications of the latest communication research with concrete suggestions to help readers better manage speaker anxiety and communication apprehension.
  • Guidance on conducting library and online research (Ch. 8) contains tips for using the Internet for speech research and suggestions for finding, evaluating, and documenting online sources.
  • “How To” boxes provide step-by-step instructions for completing the steps in the speech preparation process.

Synopsis:

"Public Speaking Handbook, 2nd edition" Steven A. Beebe, "Texas"" State University - San Marcos" Susan J. Beebe, "Texas"" State University - San Marcos" <BR> Adapted from the authors' top-selling public speaking text, "Public Speaking Handbook, Second Edition, "provides a unique, audience-centered approach in a student-friendly reference format, allowing students to access information quickly and easily. "Public Speaking Handbook" brings theory and practice together in an understandable and applicable manner. Its distinctive and popular approach emphasizes the importance of analyzing and considering the audience at every point along the way. This model of public speaking serves as a foundation as the text guides students through the step-by-step process of public speaking, focusing their attention on the importance and dynamics of diverse audiences, and narrowing the gap between the classroom and the real world. New to the Second Edition - A boxed feature called "How To" provides step-by-step instructions for completing the steps in the speech preparation process. - Updated examples and new research applications to public speaking in every chapter. - New sample speeches, both at the ends of selected chapters and in Appendix D - Integrated examples of developing a speech step-by-step. - More emphasis on rhetorical analysis in Chapter 5 to help students develop their critical thinking skills. - Expanded discussion of using humor in Chapter 21, Special-Occasion Speaking. - New tips and techniques to help students achieve their speaking goals by editing out superfluous and unnecessary elements. <BR> - TECHNOLOGY ADVANTAGE<BR>MySpeechLab is a state-of-the-art, interactive and instructivesolution for introductory public speaking. Designed to be used as a supplement to a traditional lecture course, or to completely administer an online course, MySpeechLab combines an E-book, multimedia, video clips, speech preparation activities, research support, tests and qui

Table of Contents

Chapter 1  Introduction to Public Speaking

1.a       Why Study Public Speaking?

            Empowerment

            Employment

1.b       Public Speaking and Conversation

            Public Speaking Is Planned

            Public Speaking Is Formal

            The Roles of Public Speakers and Audiences are Clearly Defined

1.c       The Communication Process

            Communication as Action

                        Source

                        Message

                        Channels

                        Receiver

                        Noise

            Communication as Interaction

                        Feedback

                        Context

            Communication as Transaction

            Quick Check: Understand the Communication Process

1.d       The Rich Heritage of Public Speaking

            Quick Check: The Rich Heritage of Public Speaking

1.e       Public Speaking and Diversity

            Diverse Audiences: A Coherent Framework

            Diverse Audiences: A Unifying Principle

 

Chapter 2  Speaking with Confidence

2.a       Understand Your Nervousness

            What Makes People Nervous when Speaking in Public?

            When are You Most Likely to Feel Nervous About Giving a Speech?

            Does Your Style of Communication Apprehension Make a Difference?

            You Are Going To Feel More Nervous Than You Look

            Almost Every Speaker Experiences Some Degree of Nervousness

            Anxiety Can Be Useful

2.b       Build Your Confidence

            Don’t Procrastinate in Preparing Your Speech

            Know Your Audience

            Select an Appropriate Topic

            Be Prepared

            Develop and Deliver a Well-Organized Speech

            Know Your Introduction and Your Conclusion

            Re-Create the Speech Environment When You Practice

            Use Deep-Breathing Techniques

            Channel Your Nervous Energy

            How to Channel Your Nervous Energy

            Visualize Your Success

            Give Yourself a Mental Pep Talk

            Focus on Your Message Rather Than Your Fear

            Look for Positive Listener Support for Your Message

            Seek Speaking Opportunities

            After Your Speech, Focus on Your Accomplishment, Not Your Anxiety

            Quick Check: Build Your Confidence

 

Chapter 3  The Audience-Centered Speechmaking Process

3.a       An Audience-Centered Speechmaking Model

3.b       Consider Your Audience

3.c       Select and Narrow Your Topic

            Who Is the Audience?

            What Is the Occasion?

            What Are My Interests, Talents, and Experiences?

3.d       Determine Your Purpose

3.e       Develop Your Central Idea

3.f        Generate the Main Ideas

            Does the Central Idea Have Logical Divisions?

            Can You Think of Several Reasons Why the Central Idea Is True?

            Can You Support the Central Idea with a Series of Steps?

3.g       Gather Verbal and Visual Supporting Material

            Criteria for Choosing Verbal Supporting Material

3.h       Organize Your Speech

            Divide Your Speech

            Outline Your Speech

            Consider Presentation Aids

3.i        Rehearse Your Speech

            Rehearse Your Speech Aloud

            Practice Making Eye Contact

            Make Decisions about the Style of Your Speech

3.j        Deliver Your Speech

            How to Prepare for a Speech

 

Chapter 4  Ethics and Free Speech

4.a       Ethics

4.b       Free Speech

4.c       Speaking Freely

            In the Twentieth Century

            In Recent History

            Quick Check: History of Free Speech in the United States

4.d       Speaking Ethically

            Have a Clear, Responsible Goal

            Use Sound Evidence and Reasoning

            Be Sensitive To and Tolerant of Differences

            Be Honest

            Avoid Plagiarism

                        Do Your Own Work

                        Acknowledge Your Sources

                        Take Careful Notes

                        Cite Sources Correctly

            Quick Check: The Ethical Public Speaker

4.e       Listening Ethically

            Communicate Your Expectations and Feedback

            Be Sensitive To and Tolerant of Differences

            Listen Critically

            Quick Check: The Ethical Listener

 

Chapter 5  Listening to Speeches

5.a       Barriers to Effective Listening

            Select

            Attend

            Understand

            Remember

            Information Overload

            How to Prevent Information Overload

            Personal Concerns

            Outside Distractions

            How to Minimize Distractions

            Prejudice

            How to Counteract Prejudice

            Differences Between Speech Rate and Thought Rate

            Receiver Apprehension

            How to Overcome Receiver Apprehension

5.b       Becoming a Better Listener

            Adapt to the Speaker’s Delivery

            Listen With Your Eyes as Well as Your Ears

            Monitor Your Emotional Reaction to a Message

            Avoid Jumping to Conclusions

            Be a Selfish Listener

            Listen for Major Ideas

            Identify Your Listening Goal

                        Listening for Pleasure

                        Listening to Empathize

                        Listening to Evaluate

                        Listening for Information

            Practice Listening

            Understand Your Listening Style

                        People-Oriented Listeners

                        Action-Oriented Listeners

                        Content-Oriented Listeners

                        Time-Oriented Listeners

            Quick Check: Enhance Your Listening Skills

            Become an Active Listener

5.c       Improve Your Note-Taking Skills

            Prepare

            Determine Whether You Need to Take Notes

            Decide on the Type of Notes You Need to Take

            Make Your Notes Meaningful

5.d       Listening and Critical Thinking

            Separate Facts from Inferences

            Evaluate the Quality of Evidence

            Evaluate the Underlying Logic and Reasoning

5.e       Analyzing and Evaluating Speeches

            Understanding Criteria for Evaluating Speeches

                        The Message Should Be Effective

                        The Message Should Be Ethical

            Identifying and Analyzing Rhetorical Strategies

            Giving Feedback to Others

            Giving Feedback to Yourself

                        Look For and Reinforce Your Skills and Speaking Abilities

                        Evaluate Your Effectiveness Based on Your Specific Speaking Situation and Audience

                        Identify One or Two Areas for Improvement

 

Chapter 6  Analyzing Your Audience

6.a       Becoming an Audience-Centered Speaker

            How to Become an Audience-Centered Speaker

6.b       Gather Information about Your Audience

            Gathering Information Informally

            Gathering Information Formally

            Analyze Information About Your Audience

            Adapt To Your Audience

6.c       Analyzing Your Audience Before You Speak

            Demographic Audience Analysis

                        Age

                        Gender

                                    Avoid Gender Stereotypes

                                    Avoid Sexist Language

                                    Be Inclusive

                                    Avoid Making Assumptions about Gender

                        Sexual Orientation

                        Culture, Ethnicity, and Race

                                    Individualistic and Collectivistic Cultures

                                    High-Context and Low-Context Cultures

                                    Tolerance of Uncertainty and Need For Certainty

                                    High-Power and Low-Power Cultures

            Quick Check: Describing Cultural Differences

                        Group Membership

                                    Religious Groups

                                    Political Groups

                                    Work Groups

                                    Social Groups

                                    Service Groups

                        Socioeconomic Status

                                    Income

                                    Occupation

                                    Education

                        Adapting To Diverse Listeners

                                    Focus on a Target Audience

                                    Use Diverse Strategies for a Diverse Audience

            How To Use Diverse Strategies

                                    Identify Common Values

                                    Rely on Visual Materials That Transcend Language Differences

            Quick Check: Adapting to Diverse Listeners

            Psychological Audience Analysis

                        Attitudes

                        Beliefs

                        Values

                        Analyzing Attitudes Toward The Topic

                        Your Speech Class As Audience

            Quick Check: Adapting Your Message to Different Types of Audiences

                        Analyzing Attitudes Toward You, The Speaker

            Situational Audience Analysis

                        Time

                        Size of Audience

                        Location

                        Occasion

6.d       Adapting to Your Audience as You Speak

            Identifying Nonverbal Audience Cues

                        Eye Contact

                        Facial Expression

                        Movement

                        Nonverbal Responsiveness

                        Verbal Responsiveness

            Responding To Nonverbal Cues

            Quick Check: Analyzing and Adapting to Your Audience as You Speak

            Strategies for Customizing Your Message to Your Audience

                        Appropriately Use Audience Members’ Names

                        Refer to the Town, City, or Community

                        Refer to a Significant Event that Happened on the Date of Your Speech

                        Refer to a Recent News Event

                        Refer to a Group or Organization

                        Relate Information Directly to Your Listeners

6.e Analyzing Your Audience after You Speak

            Nonverbal Responses

            Verbal Responses

            Survey Responses

            Behavioral Responses

 

Chapter 7  Developing Your Speech

7.a       Select and Narrow Your Topic

            Guidelines For Selecting A Topic

                        Consider the Audience

                        Consider the Occasion

                        Consider Yourself

            Strategies for Selecting a Topic

                        Brainstorming

            How to Brainstorm for a Topic

                        Listening and Reading for Topic Ideas

                        Scanning Web Directories

            Narrowing the Topic

                        Create Categories

                        Find the Right Level

7.b       Determine Your Purpose

            General Purpose

                        Speaking to Inform

                        Speaking to Persuade

                        Speaking to Entertain

            Specific Purpose

                        Identify a Behavioral Objective

                        Formulate the Specific Purpose

            Quick Check: Specific Purposes for Speeches

                        Use the Specific Purpose

7.c       Develop Your Central Idea

            A Complete Declarative Sentence

            Direct, Specific Language

            A Single Idea

            An Audience-Centered Idea

            Quick Check: Purpose Statement versus Central Idea

7.d       Generate and Preview Your Main Ideas

            Generating Your Main Ideas

                        Finding Logical Divisions

                        Establishing Reasons

                        Tracing Specific Steps

            Previewing Your Main Ideas

7.e       Meanwhile, Back at the Computer . . .

 

Chapter 8  Gathering Supporting Material

8.a       Personal Knowledge and Experience

8.b       The Internet

            The World Wide Web

            Directories and Search Engines

                        Browsing Broad Categories

                        Using Key Words

                        Doing Advanced Searches

            How To Do an Advanced Search

            Evaluating Web Resources

                        Accountability

                        Accuracy

                        Objectivity

                        Date

                        Usability

                        Diversity

8.c       Library Resources

            Books

                        Stacks

                        Card Catalog

            Periodicals

            Full-Text Databases

            Newspapers

                        Back Issues

                        Indexes

            Reference Resources

            Government Documents

            Special Services

            Quick Check: Supporting Materials in the Resources

8.d       Interviews

            Determining the Purpose of the Interview

            Setting Up the Interview

            Planning the Interview

                        Gather Background Information

                        Plan Specific Questions

                        Plan a Sequence of Questions

                        Plan a Recording Strategy

            Conducting the Interview

                        On Your Mark...

                        Get Set...

                        Go!

            Following Up the Interview

8.e       Resources from Special-Interest Groups and Organizations

8.f        Research Strategies

            Develop a Preliminary Bibliography

                        Keep Track of Resources

                        Use a Consistent Format

            How to Document an Electronic Resource in MLA Format

                        Choose an Appropriate Number

            Evaluate the Usefulness of Resources

            Take Notes

                        Start with the Most Useful Resources

                        Create a Record of Resource Notes

                        Use a Notebook, Disk, or Note Cards

                        Write One Idea per Card or Page

                        Indicate the Source

                        Summarize the Idea

            Identify Possible Presentation Aids

            Quick Check: Research Strategies

 

Chapter 9  Supporting Your Speech

9.a       Illustrations

            Brief Illustrations

            Extended Illustrations

            Hypothetical Illustrations

            Using Illustrations Effectively

                        Be Sure Your Illustrations Are Relevant To What They Are Supposed To Support

                        Choose Illustrations That Represent a Trend

                        Make Your Illustrations Vivid and Specific

                        Use Illustrations with Which Your Listeners Can Identify

                        Remember That the Best Illustrations Are Personal Ones

            Quick Check: Choose the Right Illustrations

9.b       Descriptions and Explanations

            Describing

            Explaining How

            Explaining Why

            Using Descriptions and Explanations Effectively

                        Keep Your Descriptions and Explanations Brief

                        Use Language That Is as Specific and Concrete as Possible

                        Avoid Too Much Description and Explanation

9.c       Definitions

            Definitions By Classification

            Operational Definitions

            Using Definitions Effectively

                        Use a Definition Only When Needed

                        Be Certain That Your Definition Is Understandable

                        Be Certain That Your Definition and Your Use of a Term Are Consistent Throughout a Speech

9.d       Analogies

            Literal Analogies

            Figurative Analogies

            Using Analogies Effectively

                        Be Sure That the Two Things You Compare in a Literal Analogy Are Very Similar

                        Be Sure That the Essential Similarity Between the Two Objects of a Figurative Analogy Is Readily Apparent

9.e       Statistics

            Using Statistics as Support

            Using Statistics Effectively

                        Use Reliable Sources

                                    Reputable

                                    Authoritative

                                    Unbiased

                        Interpret Statistics Accurately

                        Make Your Statistics Understandable and Memorable

                                    Compacting statistics

                                    Exploding statistics

                                    Comparing statistics

                        Round Off Numbers

                        Use Visual Aids to Present Your Statistics

            Quick Check: Select Effective Statistics

9.f        Opinions

            Expert Testimony

            Lay Testimony

            Literary Quotations

            Using Opinions Effectively

                        Be Certain That Any Authority You Cite Is an Expert on the Subject

                        Identify Your Sources

                        Cite Unbiased Authorities

                        Cite Opinions That Are Representative of Prevailing Opinion

                        Quote Your Sources Accurately

                        Use Literary Quotations Sparingly

            Quick Check: Types of Supporting Material

9.g       Selecting the Best Supporting Material

            How to Decide the Best Supporting Material

 

Chapter 10  Organizing Your Speech

10.a     Organizing Your Main Ideas

            Ordering Ideas Chronologically

                        Forward in Time

                        Backward in Time

                        How-To Explanations

            Organizing Ideas Topically

                        Personal Preference

                        Recency

                        Primacy

                        Complexity

            Arranging Ideas Spatially

                        Location and Direction

            Organizing Ideas To Show Cause And Effect

                        Cause—Effect

                        Effect—Cause

            Organizing Ideas By Problem And Solution

                        Problem—Solution

                        Solution—Problem

            Acknowledging Cultural Differences in Organization

            Quick Check: Organize Main Ideas

10.b     Subdividing Your Main Ideas

10.c     Integrating Your Supporting Material

            Word-Processing Files

            Note Cards

            Photocopies

            Smooth Incorporation of Support Material

            Quick Check: Integrate Supporting Material

10.d     Organizing Your Supporting Material

            Primacy Or Recency

            Specificity

            Complexity

            Soft To Hard Evidence

            Quick Check: Organizing Your Supporting Material

10.e     Developing Signposts

            Transitions

                        Verbal Transitions

                        Avoid Signaling the End of the Speech

            Quick Check: Verbal Transitions

                        Nonverbal Transitions

            Previews

                        Initial Previews

                        Internal Previews

                        Questions as Internal Previews

            Summaries

                        Final Summary

                        Internal Summary

            Quick Check: Types of Signposts

10.f      Supplementing Signposts with Presentation Aids

 

Chapter 11  Introducing Your Speech

11.a     Purposes of Introductions

            Get the Audience’s Attention

            Introduce the Subject

            Give the Audience a Reason to Listen

            Establish Your Credibility

            Preview Your Main Ideas

            Quick Check: Purposes of Your Introduction

            Quick Check: Does Your Introduction Accomplish Its Purpose?

11.b     Effective Introductions

            Illustrations or Anecdotes

            Startling Facts or Statistics

            Quotations

            Humor

                        Subtle Humor

                        Humor and Diversity

            Questions

                        Delivery

                        Audience Response

                        Questions with Other Methods

            References to Historical Events

            References to Recent Events

            Personal References

            References to the Occasion

            References to Preceding Speeches

            How to Develop an Effective Introduction

 

Chapter 12  Concluding Your Speech

12.a     Purposes of Conclusions

            Summarize the Speech

            Reemphasize the Central Idea in a Memorable Way

            Motivate the Audience to Respond

            Provide Closure

            Quick Check: Purposes of Your Speech Conclusion

12.b     Effective Conclusions

            References to the Introduction

            Inspirational Appeals or Challenges

            Appeals to Action

            How to Develop an Effective Conclusion

 

Chapter 13  Outlining and Editing Your Speech

13.a     Developing a Preparation Outline

            The Preparation Outline

                        Write Your Preparation Outline in Complete Sentences

                        Use Standard Outline Form

                        Use Standard Outline Numbering

                        Use at Least Two Subdivisions, If Any, for Each Point

                        Indent Main Ideas, Points, Subpoints, and Supporting Material Properly

                        Write and Label Your Specific Purpose at the Top of Your Preparation Outline

                        Add the Blueprint, Key Signposts, and an Introduction and Conclusion to Your Outline

                        Quick Check: Summary of Correct Outline Form

            Sample Preparation Outline

13.b     Editing Your Speech

            Review Your Specific Purpose

            Consider Your Audience

            Simply Say It

            How to Avoid Long Phrases

            Keep Only the Best Supporting Material

            Ask a Listener to Help You Cut

            Look at Your Introduction and Conclusion

13.c     Developing Your Delivery Outline and Speaking Notes

            The Delivery Outline

            Sample Delivery Outline

            Speaking Notes

 

Chapter 14  Using Words Well: Speaker Language and Style

14.a     Oral versus Written Language Style

            Oral Style Is More Personal Than Written Style

            Oral Style Is Less Formal Than Written Style

            Oral Style Is More Repetitive Than Written Style

            Quick Check: Oral versus Written Style

14.b     Using Words Effectively

            Use Specific, Concrete Words

            Use Simple Words

            Use Words Correctly

                        Connotation and Denotation

14.c     Adapting Your Language Style to Diverse Listeners

            Use Language That Your Audience Can Understand

            Use Appropriate Language

            Use Unbiased Language

14.d     Crafting Memorable Word Structures

            Creating Figurative Images

                        Metaphors and Similes

                        Personification

            Creating Drama

                        Use a Short Sentence to Express a Vitally Important Thought

                        Use Omission

                        Use Inversion

                        Use Suspension

            Creating Cadence

                        Parallelism

                        Antithesis

                        Repetition

                        Alliteration

            Quick Check: Crafting Memorable Word Structures

            Analyzing an Example of Memorable Word Structure

14.e     Tips For Using Language Effectively

            How to Create Figurative Images, Drama, and Cadence

 

Chapter 15  Delivering Your Speech

15.a     The Power of Speech Delivery

            Listeners Expect Effective Delivery

                        Platform Conversation

                        Audience-Centered Delivery

            Listeners Make Emotional Connections with You Through Delivery

            Listeners Believe What They See

15.b     Methods of Delivery

            Manuscript Speaking

                        Need for Careful Crafting

                        Delivery Cues

            Memorized Speaking

                        Risks

                        Appropriate Use

            Impromptu Speaking

                        Essential Preparation

                        Guidelines for Impromptu Speaking

            Quick Check: Impromptu Presentations

            Extemporaneous Speaking

            Quick Check: Methods of Delivery

15.c     Characteristics of Effective Delivery

            Eye Contact

                        Credibility

                        Priority

                        Inclusion

            Quick Check: Benefits of Eye Contact

            Gestures

                        Cultural Expectations

                        Inappropriate Gestures

                        Functions of Gestures

                        Using Gestures Effectively

            Quick Check: Effective Gestures

            Movement

                        Purpose, Not Distraction

                        Physical Barriers

                        Immediacy

                        Transitions

            Posture

            Facial Expression

            Vocal Delivery

                        Speaking To Be Understood

                                    Volume

                                    Articulation

                                    Dialect

                                    Pronunciation

                        Speaking with Variety

                                    Pitch

                                    Rate

                                    Pauses

                                    Silence

                        Using a Microphone

                                    Lavaliere Microphone

                                    Boom Microphone

                                    Stationary Microphone

            Quick Check: Characteristics of Good Vocal Delivery

            Personal Appearance

15.d     Audience Diversity and Delivery

                        Avoid an Ethnocentric Mind Set

                        Consider Using a Less Dramatic Style for Predominantly High-Context Listeners

                        Consult with Other Speakers Who Have Presented to Your Audience

                        Monitor Your Level of Immediacy with Your Audience

                        Monitor Your Expression of Emotion

                        Know the Code

15.e     Rehearsing Your Speech: Some Final Tips

            How to Make the Most of Your Rehearsal Time

15.f      Delivering Your Speech

15.g     Adapting Your Speech Delivery for Television

            Consider Toning Down Gestures

            Dress for TV Success

            Monitor Your Facial Expressions

            Keep Your Target Audience In Mind

            Keep It Short

            Choose Your Words With Care And Style

            Become Familiar with the Technology Before You Speak

15.h     Responding to Questions

 

Chapter 16  Designing and Using Presentation Aids

16.a     The Value of Presentation Aids

            Presentation Aids Enhance Understanding

            Presentation Aids Enhance Memory

            Presentation Aids Help Listeners Organize Ideas

            Presentation Aids Help Gain and Maintain Attention

            Presentation Aids Help Illustrate a Sequence of Events or Procedures

            Quick Check: The Value of Presentation Aids

16.b     Types of Presentation Aids

            Three-Dimensional Presentation Aids

                        Objects

                        Models

                        People

            Two-Dimensional Presentation Aids

                        Drawings

                        Photographs

                        Slides

                        Maps

                        Graphs

                        Charts

                        Flipcharts

                        Chalkboards and Whiteboards

                        Overhead Transparencies

            How to Use an Overhead Projector

            Audiovisual Aids

                        Videotapes and Movies

                        CDs

                        Digital Video Disks (DVDs)

                        Audio Aids

                        Computer-Generated Aids

16.c     Guidelines for Developing Presentation Aids

            Allow Plenty of Time to Prepare Your Presentation Aids

            Make Them Easy To See

            Keep Them Simple

            Group Related Elements into Visual Units

            Establish A Consistent Graphic Theme

            Choose A Typeface with Care

            Vary Fonts and Font Sizes With Care

                        Choosing a Font

                        Choosing Font Sizes

            Use Color to Create a Mood and Sustain Attention

                        Avoid Conflicting Colors

                        Design for Contrast

            Use Black And White Effectively

            Don’t Detract from the Message

            Show Numerical Data Graphically

            How to Select the Right Presentation Aids

16.d     Guidelines for Using Presentation Aids

            Do Not Use Dangerous or Illegal Presentation Aids

            Rehearse with Your Presentation Aids

            Make Eye Contact with Your Audience, Not with Your Presentation Aids

            Explain Your Presentation Aids

            Do Not Pass Objects Among Members of Your Audience

            Use Animals with Caution

            Use Handouts Effectively

            Time the Use of Visuals to Control Your Audience’s Attention

            Use Technology Effectively

            Remember Murphy’s Law

            How to Use Presentation Aids Effectively

 

Chapter 17  Using Presentation Software

17.a     Presentation Software

17.b     Using Presentation Software

            Keep Sights and Sounds Simple

            Repeat Visual Elements to Unify Your Presentation

            Choose a Typeface With Care

            Make Informed Decisions About Using Color

            Allow Plenty of Time To Prepare Your Presentation Aids

            How to Develop Effective PowerPoint Visuals

17.c     Preparing A Presentation With PowerPoint

            AutoContent Wizard

            Template

            Blank Presentation

            Open an Existing Presentation

            Saving a Presentation

            Viewing a Presentation

                        Slide View

                        Outline View

                        Master View

                        Slide Sorter View

                        Black-and-White View

                        Notes Page View

            Creating a Consistent Look

                        Slide Master

                        Color Schemes

            Creating A Distinctive Look

                        Adding Text

                        Inserting Pictures

                        Inserting Charts and Graphs

            Printing a Presentation

            Creating Speaker Notes and Handouts

            Using Special Effects

            Quick Check: Be Prepared

 

Chapter 18  Speaking to Inform

18.a     Goals of Informative Speaking

            Speaking To Enhance Understanding

            Speaking To Maintain Interest

            Speaking To Be Remembered

            Quick Check: Goals of Informative Speeches

18.b     Types of Informative Speeches

            Speeches About Objects

            Speeches About Procedures

            Speeches About People

            Speeches About Events

                        Make the Event Come Alive

                        Organize for Effect

            Speeches About Ideas

            Quick Check: Types of Informative Speeches

18.c     Strategies to Enhance Audience Understanding

            Speak With Clarity

            How to Enhance Message Clarity

            Use Principles and Techniques Of Adult Learning

                        Adults Like to Be Given Information They Can Use Immediately

                        Adult Learners Like to Be Actively Involved in the Learning Process

                        Adult Learners Like to Connect Their Life Experiences with the New Information

                        Adult Learners Like to Know How the New Information Is Relevant to Their Needs and Busy Lives

                        Adult Learners Are Problem-Oriented Learners

            Clarify Complex Processes

            Use Effective Visual Reinforcement

            How to Enhance Audience Understanding

18.d     Strategies to Maintain Audience Interest

            Establish a Motive for Your Audience to Listen to You

            Tell a Story

            Quick Check: What Makes a Good Story?

            Present Information That Relates to Your Listeners

18.e     Strategies to Enhance Audience Recall

            Build in Redundancy

            Pace Your Information Flow

            Reinforce Key Ideas Verbally

            Reinforce Key Ideas Nonverbally

                        Quick Check: What Makes a Good Story?

Quick Check: Enhance Audience Recall

 

Chapter 19  Understanding Principles of Persuasive Speaking

19.a     Persuasion Defined

            Attitudes

            Beliefs

            Values

19.b     How Persuasion Works

19.c     How to Motivate Listeners

            Use Dissonance

                        How Listeners Cope with Dissonance

            Use Listener Needs

                        Physiological Needs

                        Safety Needs

                        Social Needs

                        Self-Esteem Needs

                        Self-Actualization Needs

            Use Positive Motivation

            Use Negative Motivation

                        Quick Check: What Makes a Good Story?

Quick Check: Using Fear Appeals to Persuade

19.d     How to Develop Your Persuasive Speech

            Consider the Audience

            Select and Narrow Your Persuasive Topic

                        Controversial Issues

                        Media and Internet Resources

            Determine Your Persuasive Purpose

            Develop Your Central Idea and Main Ideas

                        Proposition of Fact

                        Proposition of Value

                        Proposition of Policy

19.e     Putting Persuasive Principles into Practice

            Quick Check: What Makes a Good Story?

Quick Check: Persuasive Propositions: Developing Your Central Idea

 

Chapter 20  Using Persuasive Strategies

20.a     Establishing Credibility

20.b     Enhancing Your Credibility

            Initial Credibility

            Derived Credibility

            Terminal Credibility

20.c     Using Logic and Evidence to Persuade

            Understanding Types of Reasoning

                        Inductive Reasoning

            How to Judge the Validity of a Generalization

                        Reasoning by Analogy

                        Deductive Reasoning

            How to Test the Truth of an Argument

                        Causal Reasoning

            Quick Check: Comparing Inductive, Deductive, Causal Reasoning

            Persuading the Diverse Audience

                        Evidence

                        Appeals to Action

                        Message Structure

                        Persuasive Communication Style

            Supporting Your Reasoning With Evidence

                        Facts

                        Examples

                        Hypothetical Examples

                        Opinions

                        Statistics

            Avoiding Faulty Reasoning: Ethical Issues

                        Causal Fallacy

                        Bandwagon Fallacy

                        Either/Or Fallacy

                        Hasty Generalization

                        Ad Hominem

                        Red Herring

                        Appeal to Misplaced Authority

                        Non Sequitur

20.d     Using Emotion to Persuade

            Tips for Using Emotion to Persuade

                        Use Concrete Examples That Help Your Listeners Visualize What You Describe

                        Use Emotion-Arousing Words

                        Use Nonverbal Behavior to Communicate Your Emotional Response

                        Use Visual Images to Evoke Emotions

                        Use Appropriate Metaphors and Similes

                        Use Appropriate Fear Appeals

                        Consider Using Appeals to Several Emotions

                        Tap Audience Members’ Beliefs in Shared Myths

            Using Emotional Appeals: Ethical Issues

            How to Use Emotion to Persuade

20.e     Strategies for Adapting Ideas to People and People to Ideas

            Persuading the Receptive Audience

                        Identify With Your Audience

                        Clearly State Your Speaking Objective

                        Tell Your Audience Exactly What You Want Them to Do

                        Ask Listeners for an Immediate Show of Support

                        Use Emotional Appeals Effectively

                        Make It Easy For Your Listeners to Act

            Persuading the Neutral Audience

                        Capture Your Listeners’ Attention Early In Your Speech

                        Refer To Beliefs That Many Listeners Share

                        Relate Your Topic Not Only To Your Listeners But Also To Their Families, Friends, And Loved Ones

                        Be Realistic About What You Can Accomplish

            Persuading the Unreceptive Audience

                        Don’t Immediately Announce That You Plan To Change Their Minds

                        Begin Your Speech by Noting Areas of Agreement Before You Discuss Areas of Disagreement

                        Don’t Expect a Major Shift in Attitude from a Hostile Audience

                        Acknowledge the Opposing Points Of View That Members of Your Audience May Hold

                        Establish Your Credibility

                        Consider Making Understanding Rather Than Advocacy Your Goal

20.f      Strategies for Organizing Persuasive Messages

            Problem—Solution

            Refutation

            Cause and Effect

            The Motivated Sequence

            Quick Check: Organizational Patterns for Persuasive Messages

 

Chapter 21  Special-Occasion Speaking

21.a     Public Speaking in the Workplace

            Reports

            Public-Relations Speeches

                        Discuss the Need or Problem

                        Anticipate Criticism

21.b     Ceremonial Speaking

            Introductions

            Quick Check: Introduce a Speaker

            Toasts

            Award Presentations

                        Refer to the Occasion

                        Talk About the History and Significance of the Award

                        Name the Person

            Nominations

            Acceptances

            How to Give an Acceptance Speech

            Keynote Addresses

            Commencement Addresses

            Commemorative Addresses And Tributes

            Eulogies

            How to Deliver a Eulogy

21.c     After-Dinner Speaking: Using Humor Effectively

            Humorous Stories

            Humorous Verbal Strategies

                        Plays On Words

                        Hyperbole

                        Understatement

                        Verbal Irony

                        Wit

            Humorous Nonverbal Strategies

            Quick Check: Strategies for Achieving Humor in After-Dinner Speeches

 

Appendices

A       Speaking in Small Groups

            Small Group Communication

            Solving Problems in Groups and Teams

            Participating in Small Groups

            Leading Small Groups

            Managing Meetings

            Planning a Group Presentation

            Making a Group Presentation

B       The Classical Tradition of Rhetoric

            The Earliest Teachers of Rhetoric

            Beginning of the Greek Tradition: The Sophists

            Plato

            Aristotle          

            The Roman Tradition

            Conclusion

C       Suggested Speech Topics

            Informative Speech Topics

            Persuasive Speech Topics

D       Speeches for Analysis and Discussion

            I have a Dream by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

            Making Democracy Work: Your Responsibilty to Society by Cynthia Opheim

            Van Gogh’s Incredible Life by Kristy Shaw

            The Electoral College by Nathan Harrington

            The Dirty Secret by Ben Johnson

            Binge Drinking on College Campuses by Ali Heidarpour

            Curtailing the Contemporary College Counseling Crisis by Sonja Ralston

 

 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780205502967
Author:
Beebe, Susan J.
Publisher:
Allyn & Bacon
Author:
Beebe, Susan J.
Author:
Beebe, Steven A.
Subject:
Public Speaking
Subject:
Theater - General
Subject:
Oral communication
Copyright:
Edition Number:
2
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
MySpeechLab Series
Publication Date:
October 2006
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
552
Dimensions:
8.78 x 8.6 x 0.9 in 941 gr

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Public Speaking Handbook (2ND 07 - Old Edition) Used Spiral
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Product details 552 pages Allyn & Bacon - English 9780205502967 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Key features for this edition include:

  • Easy-to-use, reference format enables readers to look up and use information quickly. Tabbed dividers enable readers to access chapters quickly, while the spiral binding makes working with the book easy.
  • Tabbed sections offer "At a Glance" outlines that highlight chapter content for easy reference.
  • Unique, audience-centered approach, introduced in the Beebes' prior edition, emphasizes the importance of considering the audience at all stages of the public speaking process. The audience-centered model, displayed on each tabbed divider, reminds readers of the steps involved in speech preparation and delivery, while simultaneously emphasizing the ongoing process of analyzing and adapting to listeners.
  • Brief "Quick Check" summaries throughout the book recap key information for quick review.
  • A Question of Ethics boxes (throughout the book) invite students to consider ethical issues as they prepare and deliver their presentations, including the tradition of free speech in a democratic society, plagiarism, honesty in communication, the legitimate use of evidence and reasoning, and the need for tolerance.
  • Extensive coverage of overcoming speech anxiety (Ch. 2) includes applications of the latest communication research with concrete suggestions to help readers better manage speaker anxiety and communication apprehension.
  • Guidance on conducting library and online research (Ch. 8) contains tips for using the Internet for speech research and suggestions for finding, evaluating, and documenting online sources.
  • “How To” boxes provide step-by-step instructions for completing the steps in the speech preparation process.

"Synopsis" by , "Public Speaking Handbook, 2nd edition" Steven A. Beebe, "Texas"" State University - San Marcos" Susan J. Beebe, "Texas"" State University - San Marcos" <BR> Adapted from the authors' top-selling public speaking text, "Public Speaking Handbook, Second Edition, "provides a unique, audience-centered approach in a student-friendly reference format, allowing students to access information quickly and easily. "Public Speaking Handbook" brings theory and practice together in an understandable and applicable manner. Its distinctive and popular approach emphasizes the importance of analyzing and considering the audience at every point along the way. This model of public speaking serves as a foundation as the text guides students through the step-by-step process of public speaking, focusing their attention on the importance and dynamics of diverse audiences, and narrowing the gap between the classroom and the real world. New to the Second Edition - A boxed feature called "How To" provides step-by-step instructions for completing the steps in the speech preparation process. - Updated examples and new research applications to public speaking in every chapter. - New sample speeches, both at the ends of selected chapters and in Appendix D - Integrated examples of developing a speech step-by-step. - More emphasis on rhetorical analysis in Chapter 5 to help students develop their critical thinking skills. - Expanded discussion of using humor in Chapter 21, Special-Occasion Speaking. - New tips and techniques to help students achieve their speaking goals by editing out superfluous and unnecessary elements. <BR> - TECHNOLOGY ADVANTAGE<BR>MySpeechLab is a state-of-the-art, interactive and instructivesolution for introductory public speaking. Designed to be used as a supplement to a traditional lecture course, or to completely administer an online course, MySpeechLab combines an E-book, multimedia, video clips, speech preparation activities, research support, tests and qui
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