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Other titles in the Historical Studies of Urban America series:

Building the South Side: Urban Space and Civic Culture in Chicago, 1890-1919 (Historical Studies of Urban America)

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Building the South Side: Urban Space and Civic Culture in Chicago, 1890-1919 (Historical Studies of Urban America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Building the South Side explores the struggle for influence that dominated the planning and development of Chicago's South Side during the Progressive Era. Robin F. Bachin examines the early days of the University of Chicago, Chicagoand#8217;s public parks, Comiskey Park, and the Black Belt to consider how community leaders looked to the physical design of the city to shape its culture and promote civic interaction.

Bachin highlights how the creation of a local terrain of civic culture was a contested process, with the battle for cultural authority transforming urban politics and blurring the line between private and public space. In the process, universities, parks and playgrounds, and commercial entertainment districts emerged as alternative arenas of civic engagement.

and#160;and#8220;Bachin incisively charts the development of key urban institutions and landscapes that helped constitute the messy vitality of Chicagoand#8217;s late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century public realm.and#8221;and#8212;Daniel Bluestone, Journal of American History
"This is an ambitious book filled with important insights about issues of public space and its use by urban residents. . . . It is thoughtful, very well written, and should be read and appreciated by anyone interested in Chicago or cities generally. It is also a gentle reminder that people are as important as structures and spaces in trying to understand urban development."
and#8212;Maureen A. Flanagan, American Historical Review

Synopsis:

Building the South Side explores the struggle for influence that dominated the planning and development of Chicago's South Side during the Progressive Era. Robin Bachin examines the early days of the University of Chicago, Chicago's public parks, Comiskey Park, and the Black Belt to consider how community leaders looked to the physical design of the city to shape its culture and promote civic interaction.

The built environment created in these spaces compels us to rethink the significance of Progressivism by framing the era's political history within the context of broader cultural conflicts of the period. The creation of the University of Chicago, for instance, was intended to help the city overcome its reputation for greed and materialism. Yet the school was deeply indebted to Chicago businessmen and real estate developers for financial backing. Comiskey Park, meanwhile, was meant to be an emblem of the legitimacy of commercial leisure and mass amusement in the culture of big cities. But in the wake of the ruinous 1919 Black Sox scandal, it became the inspiration for debates over Americanism, democracy, and loyalty.

Bachin highlights how the creation of a local terrain of civic culture was a contested process, with the battle for cultural authority transforming urban politics and blurring the line between private and public space. In the process, universities, parks and playgrounds, and commercial entertainment districts emerged as alternative arenas of civic engagement.


Synopsis:

Building the South Side explores the struggle for influence that dominated the planning and development of Chicago's South Side during the Progressive Era. Robin Bachin examines the early days of the University of Chicago, Chicago's public parks, Comiskey Park, and the Black Belt to consider how community leaders looked to the physical design of the city to shape its culture and promote civic interaction.

The built environment created in these spaces compels us to rethink the significance of Progressivism by framing the era's political history within the context of broader cultural conflicts of the period. The creation of the University of Chicago, for instance, was intended to help the city overcome its reputation for greed and materialism. Yet the school was deeply indebted to Chicago businessmen and real estate developers for financial backing. Comiskey Park, meanwhile, was meant to be an emblem of the legitimacy of commercial leisure and mass amusement in the culture of big cities. But in the wake of the ruinous 1919 Black Sox scandal, it became the inspiration for debates over Americanism, democracy, and loyalty.

Bachin highlights how the creation of a local terrain of civic culture was a contested process, with the battle for cultural authority transforming urban politics and blurring the line between private and public space. In the process, universities, parks and playgrounds, and commercial entertainment districts emerged as alternative arenas of civic engagement.

About the Author

Robin F. Bachin is the Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part 1 - The University and the City

1. A New Order of Things: Planning and Building the University of Chicago

2. The City Seeking Aid from Alma Mater: Collegiate Culture, Coeducation, and the Boundaries of College and Community

Part 2 - Parks as Public Space

3. To Lay the Foundations for Good Citizenship: Neighborhood Parks and Outdoor Recreation

4. Let Your Watchword Be Order and Your Beacon Beauty: The Burnham Plan and the Civic Lakefront

Part 3 - Commercial Leisure and Civic Culture

5. Baseball Palace of the World: Commercial Recreation and the Building of Comiskey Park

6. A Mecca for Pleasure: Leisure, Work, and Spaces of Race Pride

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226033938
Author:
Bachin, Robin Faith
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Bachin, Robin F.
Location:
Chicago
Subject:
Sociology - Urban
Subject:
Chicago
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Social values
Subject:
Working class
Subject:
United States - State & Local - South
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Midwest
Subject:
Public Policy - City Planning & Urban Dev.
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.) Social conditions.
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.) Race relations.
Subject:
World History-General
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Series Volume:
3089
Publication Date:
20040331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
71 halftones
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » City Specific
History and Social Science » World History » General

Building the South Side: Urban Space and Civic Culture in Chicago, 1890-1919 (Historical Studies of Urban America) New Hardcover
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Product details 448 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226033938 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Building the South Side explores the struggle for influence that dominated the planning and development of Chicago's South Side during the Progressive Era. Robin Bachin examines the early days of the University of Chicago, Chicago's public parks, Comiskey Park, and the Black Belt to consider how community leaders looked to the physical design of the city to shape its culture and promote civic interaction.

The built environment created in these spaces compels us to rethink the significance of Progressivism by framing the era's political history within the context of broader cultural conflicts of the period. The creation of the University of Chicago, for instance, was intended to help the city overcome its reputation for greed and materialism. Yet the school was deeply indebted to Chicago businessmen and real estate developers for financial backing. Comiskey Park, meanwhile, was meant to be an emblem of the legitimacy of commercial leisure and mass amusement in the culture of big cities. But in the wake of the ruinous 1919 Black Sox scandal, it became the inspiration for debates over Americanism, democracy, and loyalty.

Bachin highlights how the creation of a local terrain of civic culture was a contested process, with the battle for cultural authority transforming urban politics and blurring the line between private and public space. In the process, universities, parks and playgrounds, and commercial entertainment districts emerged as alternative arenas of civic engagement.


"Synopsis" by ,
Building the South Side explores the struggle for influence that dominated the planning and development of Chicago's South Side during the Progressive Era. Robin Bachin examines the early days of the University of Chicago, Chicago's public parks, Comiskey Park, and the Black Belt to consider how community leaders looked to the physical design of the city to shape its culture and promote civic interaction.

The built environment created in these spaces compels us to rethink the significance of Progressivism by framing the era's political history within the context of broader cultural conflicts of the period. The creation of the University of Chicago, for instance, was intended to help the city overcome its reputation for greed and materialism. Yet the school was deeply indebted to Chicago businessmen and real estate developers for financial backing. Comiskey Park, meanwhile, was meant to be an emblem of the legitimacy of commercial leisure and mass amusement in the culture of big cities. But in the wake of the ruinous 1919 Black Sox scandal, it became the inspiration for debates over Americanism, democracy, and loyalty.

Bachin highlights how the creation of a local terrain of civic culture was a contested process, with the battle for cultural authority transforming urban politics and blurring the line between private and public space. In the process, universities, parks and playgrounds, and commercial entertainment districts emerged as alternative arenas of civic engagement.

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