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From Cottage to Bungalow: Houses and the Working Class in Metropolitan Chicago, 1869-1929 (Chicago Architecture & Urbanism)

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From Cottage to Bungalow: Houses and the Working Class in Metropolitan Chicago, 1869-1929 (Chicago Architecture & Urbanism) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Between 1869 and 1929, immigrants streamed into the city of Chicago at unprecedented rates. The burgeoning working-class neighborhoods and houses that these immigrants inhabited are at the heart of From Cottage to Bungalow.

In this unique book, Joseph C. Bigott challenges many common assumptions about the origins of modern housing. For example, most studies of this period maintain that the prosperous, middle-class housing market produced innovations in housing and community design that filtered down to the lower ranks much later. Bigott shows that the number of houses built for the working class far exceeded those built for the middle class and argues that this dynamic low-end housing market generated enormous wealth and significant social change.

Bigott analyzes ubiquitous, yet previously ignored, aspects of the built environment to make his argument. Drawing on physical evidence found throughout Chicago, he shows how modern bungalows evolved from nineteenth-century cottages through years of incremental change in construction practices, building materials, and methods of selling real estate. He also explores the social and cultural consequences of working-class home ownership by examining two of Chicago's largest immigrant groups, the Germans and the Poles. To show how changes on the landscape affected the lives of ordinary people, Bigott provides a fascinating look inside these communities and their working conditions, labor relations, local politics, and religious institutions. He argues that an intimate, local form of capitalism thrived, even as the great corporations of the day flourished. By improving the circumstances of everyday life, immigrants expanded the notion of who might become worthy citizens to include groups who, fifty years earlier, had been considered beyond redemption.

Ultimately, this book shows that the transformation from cottage to bungalow reminds us that material progress has the power to diminish, as well as extend, the barriers that separate American citizens.

Synopsis:

It's hard to overestimate the complexity of the factors that dictate something as simple as where, and in what sorts of structures, people live. Urban planning, business, labor, ethnicity, architecture—each influences the types of structures people live in, and the sorts of lives they lead within them.

Joseph C. Bigott takes on all of these fields in From Cottage to Bungalow, a sophisticated study of domestic structures and ethnic working-class neighborhoods in Chicago during the critical period of 1869 to 1929, when the city attracted huge numbers of immigrants. Exploring the meaning of home ownership in this context, Bigott develops two case studies that combine the intimate lives of ordinary people (primarily in Chicago's Polish and German communities) with broad analysis of everything from real estate markets to the very carpentry practices used to construct houses. His progressive methods and the novel conclusions they support chronicle not only the history of housing in Chicago, but also the organizations of people's lives, and the ways in which housing has affected notions of who is—and who is not—a worthy American citizen.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-253) and index.

About the Author

Joseph C. Bigott is an assistant professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Purdue University, Calumet.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Tables

Figures

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction From Cottage to Bungalow

Part One: The Evolution of Common House Forms

Chapter One The Evolution of Construction Practice and House Forms in Chicago, 1830-1930

Construction Practice in Illinois

Factory-Produced Millwork and Component Parts

From Rural to Urban Forms

Part Two: Local Capitalism and the Origins of the Working-Class Market

Chapter Two Creating Hammond

The Creation of an Industrial Site at Hammond

Local Capital

The Housing Market in Hammond

Conclusion

Chapter Three Local Politics and the Pullman Strike

Local Politics and Community Development in Hammond

The Origins of the Pullman Strike

The Pullman Strike in Hammond

The Aftermath

Part Three: New Immigrants, Citizenship, and Chicago's Housing Market

Chapter Four Chicago Polonia and the Complex Market

Community Formation and Parish Life

The Nature of Chicago's Immigrant Housing Market

Changing Neighborhoods and the Evolution of a Complex Market

Conclusion

Part Four: Polish Community Life and the Development of

West Hammond

Chapter Five Polish Settlement in West Hammond

The Syndicate

The Settlers

Conclusion

Chapter Six First-Generation Politics and Reform in West Hammond

First-Generation Politics

Local Reform and the Vice District

Chapter Seven The New Civic Culture

Rebuilding West Hammond

Prohibition and the Business Administration

World War I, Prosperity, and the New Civic Culture

Expanding the New Civic Culture

The Emergence of Polish-American Culture

Conclusion

Conclusion The Search for Order

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226048758
Author:
Bigott, Joseph C.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Location:
Chicago
Subject:
History - General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Domestic
Subject:
Minorities
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
U.S. Architecture - General
Subject:
Housing
Subject:
Architecture, domestic
Subject:
Working class
Subject:
History : General
Subject:
Residential
Subject:
Buildings - Residential
Subject:
Housing -- Illinois.
Subject:
Working class -- Illinois.
Subject:
Architecture-Houses
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Chicago Architecture and Urbanism
Series Volume:
4658
Publication Date:
20010831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
125 halftones, 23 tables
Pages:
264
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » History » General
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Houses
History and Social Science » Americana » General

From Cottage to Bungalow: Houses and the Working Class in Metropolitan Chicago, 1869-1929 (Chicago Architecture & Urbanism) New Hardcover
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Product details 264 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226048758 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
It's hard to overestimate the complexity of the factors that dictate something as simple as where, and in what sorts of structures, people live. Urban planning, business, labor, ethnicity, architecture—each influences the types of structures people live in, and the sorts of lives they lead within them.

Joseph C. Bigott takes on all of these fields in From Cottage to Bungalow, a sophisticated study of domestic structures and ethnic working-class neighborhoods in Chicago during the critical period of 1869 to 1929, when the city attracted huge numbers of immigrants. Exploring the meaning of home ownership in this context, Bigott develops two case studies that combine the intimate lives of ordinary people (primarily in Chicago's Polish and German communities) with broad analysis of everything from real estate markets to the very carpentry practices used to construct houses. His progressive methods and the novel conclusions they support chronicle not only the history of housing in Chicago, but also the organizations of people's lives, and the ways in which housing has affected notions of who is—and who is not—a worthy American citizen.

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