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This title in other editions

Other titles in the Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, & Publishing series:

The Craft of Research (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, & Publishing)

by

The Craft of Research (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, & Publishing) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A little more than seventy-five years ago, Kate L. Turabian drafted a set of guidelines to help students understand how to write, cite, and formally submit research writing. Seven editions and more than nine million copies later, the name Turabian has become synonymous with best practices in research writing and style. Her Manual for Writers continues to be the gold standard for generations of college and graduate students in virtually all academic disciplines. Now in its eighth edition, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations has been fully revised to meet the needs of todayand#8217;s writers and researchers.

The Manual retains its familiar three-part structure, beginning with an overview of the steps in the research and writing process, including formulating questions, reading critically, building arguments, and revising drafts. Part II provides an overview of citation practices with detailed information on the two main scholarly citation styles (notes-bibliography and author-date), an array of source types with contemporary examples, and detailed guidance on citing online resources.

The final section treats all matters of editorial style, with advice on punctuation, capitalization, spelling, abbreviations, table formatting, and the use of quotations. Style and citation recommendations have been revised throughout to reflect the sixteenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style. With an appendix on paper format and submission that has been vetted by dissertation officials from across the country and a bibliography with the most up-to-date listing of critical resources available, A Manual for Writers remains the essential resource for students and their teachers.

Synopsis:

Now fully updated, this popular guide offers clear and helpful advice on how to conduct research and report it effectively. The book shows how to select a topic, create a research agenda, and how to outline a report.

Synopsis:

Voted a Best Book of 2014 by Library Journal

There is untold wealth in library collections, and, like every good librarian, Jessica Pigza loves to share. In BiblioCraft, Pigza hones her literary hunting-and-gathering skills to help creatives of all types, from DIY hobbyists to fine artists, develop projects based on library resources. In Part I, she explains how to take advantage of the riches libraries have to offer—both in person and online. In Part II, she presents 20+ projects inspired by library resources from a stellar designer cast, including STC Craft authors Natalie Chanin, Heather Ross, Liesl Gibson, and Gretchen Hirsch, and Design*Sponge founder Grace Bonney. Whatever the quest—historic watermarks transformed into pillows, Japanese family crests turned into coasters, or historic millinery instructions worked into floral fascinators—anyone can utilize library resources to bring their creative visions to life.

Synopsis:

Todayand#8217;s researchers have access to more information than ever before. Yet the new material is both overwhelming in quantity and variable in quality. How can scholars survive these twin problems and produce groundbreaking research using the physical and electronic resources available in the modern university research library? In Digital Paper, Andrew Abbott provides some much-needed answers to that question.

Abbott tells what every senior researcher knows: that research is not a mechanical, linear process, but a thoughtful and adventurous journey through a nonlinear world.and#160;He breaks library research down into seven basic and simultaneous tasks: design, search, scanning/browsing, reading, analyzing, filing, and writing. He moves the reader through the phases of research, from confusion to organization, from vague idea to polished result. He teaches how to evaluate data and prior research; how to follow a trail to elusive treasures; how to organize a project; when to start over; when to ask for help. He shows how an understanding of scholarly values, a commitment to hard work, and the flexibility to change direction combine to enable the researcher to turn a daunting mass of found material into an effective paper or thesis.

More than a mere and#160;how-to manual, Abbottand#8217;s guidebook helps teach good habits for acquiring knowledge, the foundation of knowledge worth knowing. Those looking for ten easy steps to a perfect paper may want to look elsewhere. But serious scholars, who want their work to stand the test of time, will appreciate Abbottand#8217;s unique, forthright approach and relish every page of Digital Paper.

About the Author

Kate L. Turabian (1893andndash;1987) was the graduate school dissertation secretary at the University of Chicago from 1930 to 1958. She is also the author of The Studentandrsquo;s Guide to Writing College Papers. Wayne C. Booth (1921andndash;2005) was the George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago. His many books include The Rhetoric of Fiction and For the Love of It: Amateuring and Its Rivals. Gregory G. Colomb (1951andndash;2011) was professor of English at the University of Virginia and the author of Designs on Truth: The Poetics of the Augustan Mock- Epic. He is coauthor, with Wayne C. Booth and Joseph M. Williams, of the best-selling guide The Craft of Research. Joseph M. Williams (1933andndash;2008) was professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago and the author of Style: Toward Clarity and Grace.

Table of Contents

Preface: The Aims of This Edition

Our Debts

I RESEARCH, RESEARCHERS, AND READERS

PROLOGUE:and#160;BECOMING A RESEARCHER

1 Thinking in Print: The Uses of Research, Public and Private

1.1 What Is Research?

1.2 Why Write It Up?

1.3 Why a Formal Report?

1.4and#160;Writing Is Thinking

and#160;

2 Connecting with Your Reader: (Re)Creating Yourself and

Yourand#160;Readers

2.1 Creating Roles for Yourself and Your Readers

2.2 UnderstandingYour Role

2.3and#160;Imagining Yourand#160;Readerandrsquo;s Role

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: A Checklist for Understanding Your Readers

II ASKING QUESTIONS, FINDING ANSWERS

PROLOGUE: PLANNING YOUR PROJECTandndash; AN OVERVIEW

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Creating a Writing Group

3 From Topics to Questions

3.1 From an Interest to a Topic

3.2 From a Broad Topic to a Focused One

3.3 From a Focused Topic to Questions

3.4 From a Question to Its Significance

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Finding Topics

4 From Questions to a Problem

4.1 Distinguishing Practical and Research Problems

4.2 Understanding the Common Structure of Problems

4.3 Finding a Good Research Problem

4.4and#160;Learning to Work withand#160;Problems

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Disagreeing with Your Sources

5 From Problems to Sources

5.1 Knowing How to Use Three Kinds of Sources

5.2 Locating Sources through a Libraryand#160;

5.3and#160;Locating Sources on the Internet

5.4and#160;Evaluting Sources for Relevance and Reliability

5.5 Following Bibliographic Trails

5.6 Looking beyond Predictable Sources

5.7 Using People as Primary Sources

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: The Ethics of Using People as Sources of Data

6 Engaging Sources

6.1 Knowing What Kind of Evidence to Look For

6.2 Read Complete Bibliographical Data

6.3 Engaging Sources Actively

6.4 Using Secondary Sources to Find a Problem

6.5 Using Secondary Sources to Plan Your Argument

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Manage Moments of Normal Anxiety

III MAKING A CLAIM AND SUPPORTING IT

PROLOGUE: ASSEMBLING A REASEARCH ARGUMENT

7 Making Good Arguments: An Overview

7.1 Argumentand#160;as aand#160;Conversation with Readersand#160;

7.2 Supporting Your Claim

7.3 Acknowledging and Responding toand#160;Anticipated Questions and Objectionsand#160;

7.4 Warranting the Relevance of Your Reasons

7.5 Building a Complex Argument Out of Simple Ones

7.6 Creating an Ethos by Thickening Your Argumentand#160;

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: A Common Mistake andndash; Falling Back on What You Knowand#160;

8 Claims

8.1and#160;Determining the Kind ofand#160;Claim You Should Makeand#160;

8.2 Evaluating Your Claim

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Qualifying Claims to Enhance Your Credibility

9 Reasons and Evidence

9.1 Using Reasons to Plan Your Argument

9.2 Distinguishing Evidence from Reasons

9.3 Distinguishing Evidence from Reports of It

9.4 Evaluating Evidence

10 Acknowledgments and Responses

10.1 Questioning Your Argument as Your Readers Will

10.2and#160;Imaginingand#160;Alternatives to Your Argument

10.3 Deciding What to Acknowledge

10.4 Framing Your Responses as Subordinate Arguments

10.5 The Vocabulary of Acknowledgment and Response

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Three Predicatble Disagreements

11 Warrants

11.1 Warrantsand#160;in Everyday Reasoningand#160;

11.2and#160;Warrants in Academic Arguments

11.3 Understanding the Logic of Warrants

11.4 Testingand#160;Whether aand#160;Warrant Is Reliable

11.5 Knowing When to State a Warrant

11.6 Challenging Others' Warrants

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Two Kinds of Arguments

IV PLANNING, DRAFTING, AND REVISING

PROLOGUE: PLANNING AGAIN

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Outlining and Storyboarding

12 Planning

12.1 Avoid Three Common but Flawed Plans

12.2 Planning Your Report

13 Drafting Your Report

13.1 Draft in a Way That Feels Comfortable

13.2 Use Key Words to Keep Yourself on Track

13.3 Quote, Paraphrase, and Summarize Appropriately

13.4 Integrating Direct Quotations into Your Text

13.5 Show Readers How Evidence Is Relevant

13.6 Guard against Inadvertent Plaigarism

13.7 The Social Importance of Citing Sources

13.8 Four Common Citation Styles

13.9 Work through Procrastination and Writer's Block

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;Quick Tip: Indicating Citations in Your Text

14 Revising Your Organization and Argument

14.1 Thinking Like a Reader

14.2 Revising the Frame of Your Report

14.3 Revising Your Argument

14.4 Revising the Organization of Your Report

14.5 Check Your Paragraphs

14.6 Let Your Draft Cool, Then Paraphrase It

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Abstracts

15 Communicating Evidence Visually

15.1 Choosing Visual or Verbal Representations

15.2 Choosing the Most Effective Graphic

15.3 Designing Tables, Charts, and Graphs

15.4 Specific Guidlines for Tables, Bar Charts, and Line Graphs

15.5 Communicating Data Ethically

16 Introductions and Conclusions

16.1 The Common Structure of Introductions

16.2 Step 1: Establish Common Ground

16.3 Step 2: State Your Problem

16.4 Step 3: State Your Response

16.5 Setting the Right Place for Your Introduction

16.6 Writing Your Conclusion

16.7 Finding Your First Few Words

16.8 Finding Your Last Few Words

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: Titles

17 Revising Style: Telling Your Story Clearly

17.1 Judging Style

17.2 The Firstand#160;Two Principlesand#160;of Clear Writing

17.3 A Third Principle: Old before Newand#160;

17.4 Choosing between Active and Passive

17.5 A Final Principle: Complexity Last

17.6 Spit and Polish

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Quick Tip: The Quickest Revision Strategy

V SOME LAST CONSIDERATIONS

The Ethics of Research

A Postscript for Teachers

Appendix: Bibliographical Resources

General Sources

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226065663
Author:
Booth, Wayne
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Booth, Wayne C.
Author:
Turabian, Kate L.
Author:
Booth, Wayne G.
Author:
University of Chicago Press Staff
Author:
Williams, Joseph M.
Author:
Abbott, Andrew
Author:
Colomb, Gregory G.
Author:
Pigza, Jessica
Subject:
Methodology
Subject:
Research -- Methodology.
Subject:
Research
Subject:
Technical Writing
Subject:
Science Reference-General
Subject:
General Crafts & Hobbies
Subject:
Handbooks & Manuals
Subject:
Science General-Reference
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Third Edition
Series:
Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing
Publication Date:
20080531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
5 figures
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


Reference » Research
Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Writing » Nonfiction
Reference » Writing » Writing as a Business
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Textbooks » General

The Craft of Research (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, & Publishing) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226065663 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Now fully updated, this popular guide offers clear and helpful advice on how to conduct research and report it effectively. The book shows how to select a topic, create a research agenda, and how to outline a report.
"Synopsis" by ,
Voted a Best Book of 2014 by Library Journal

There is untold wealth in library collections, and, like every good librarian, Jessica Pigza loves to share. In BiblioCraft, Pigza hones her literary hunting-and-gathering skills to help creatives of all types, from DIY hobbyists to fine artists, develop projects based on library resources. In Part I, she explains how to take advantage of the riches libraries have to offer—both in person and online. In Part II, she presents 20+ projects inspired by library resources from a stellar designer cast, including STC Craft authors Natalie Chanin, Heather Ross, Liesl Gibson, and Gretchen Hirsch, and Design*Sponge founder Grace Bonney. Whatever the quest—historic watermarks transformed into pillows, Japanese family crests turned into coasters, or historic millinery instructions worked into floral fascinators—anyone can utilize library resources to bring their creative visions to life.

"Synopsis" by ,
Todayand#8217;s researchers have access to more information than ever before. Yet the new material is both overwhelming in quantity and variable in quality. How can scholars survive these twin problems and produce groundbreaking research using the physical and electronic resources available in the modern university research library? In Digital Paper, Andrew Abbott provides some much-needed answers to that question.

Abbott tells what every senior researcher knows: that research is not a mechanical, linear process, but a thoughtful and adventurous journey through a nonlinear world.and#160;He breaks library research down into seven basic and simultaneous tasks: design, search, scanning/browsing, reading, analyzing, filing, and writing. He moves the reader through the phases of research, from confusion to organization, from vague idea to polished result. He teaches how to evaluate data and prior research; how to follow a trail to elusive treasures; how to organize a project; when to start over; when to ask for help. He shows how an understanding of scholarly values, a commitment to hard work, and the flexibility to change direction combine to enable the researcher to turn a daunting mass of found material into an effective paper or thesis.

More than a mere and#160;how-to manual, Abbottand#8217;s guidebook helps teach good habits for acquiring knowledge, the foundation of knowledge worth knowing. Those looking for ten easy steps to a perfect paper may want to look elsewhere. But serious scholars, who want their work to stand the test of time, will appreciate Abbottand#8217;s unique, forthright approach and relish every page of Digital Paper.

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