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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

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Other titles in the Historical Studies of Urban America series:

Crucibles of Black Empowerment: Chicago's Neighborhood Politics from the New Deal to Harold Washington (Historical Studies of Urban America)

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Crucibles of Black Empowerment: Chicago's Neighborhood Politics from the New Deal to Harold Washington (Historical Studies of Urban America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The term “community organizer” was deployed repeatedly against Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign as a way to paint him as an inexperienced politician unfit for the presidency. The implication was that the job of a community organizer wasnt a serious one, and that it certainly wasnt on the list of credentials needed for a presidential résumé. In reality, community organizers have played key roles in the political lives of American cities for decades, perhaps never more so than during the 1970s in Chicago, where African Americans laid the groundwork for further empowerment as they organized against segregation, discrimination, and lack of equal access to schools, housing, and jobs.

In Crucibles of Black Empowerment, Jeffrey Helgeson recounts the rise of African American political power and activism from the 1930s onward, revealing how it was achieved through community building. His book tells stories of the housewives who organized their neighbors, building tradesmen who used connections with federal officials to create opportunities in a deeply discriminatory employment sector, and the social workers, personnel managers, and journalists who carved out positions in the white-collar workforce.  Looking closely at black liberal politics at the neighborhood level in Chicago, Helgeson explains how black Chicagoans built the networks that eventually would overthrow the citys seemingly invincible political machine.

Synopsis:

Jeffrey Helgeson shows how twentieth-century black Chicagoans created and sustained race-conscious institutions and politics. Some of the city’s prominent political and cultural figures play roles in this story, but Helgeson focuses mostly on people who worked and lived outside the spotlight. Helgeson uncovers the domestic workers and housewives who organized their neighbors; the skilled building tradesmen who used connections to federal officials to create opportunities in a deeply discriminatory sector; the social workers, personnel managers, and journalists who carved out positions in the white-collar workforce while trying to use their position to open jobs to black workers. The results of these efforts remain open to debate—community institutions crumbled even as Harold Washington rose to become mayor—but, Helgeson shows, black Chicagoans engaged with the institutions of urban life in ways and to a degree not previously understood.

About the Author

Jeffrey Helgeson�is assistant professor at Texas State University. He is also a director at Labor Trail, a collaborative project of the Chicago Center for Working Class Studies.

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Maps

Introduction

1. The Politics of Home in Hard Times

2. Community Development in an Age of Protest, 1935–40

3. “Will ‘Our People Be Any Better Off after This War?”

4. A Decent Place to Live: The Postwar Housing Shortage

5. Capitalism without Capital: Postwar Employment Activism

6. Sources of Black Nationalism from the 1950s to the 1970s

7. Harold Washington: Black Power and the Resilience of Liberalism

Postscript: The Obamas and Black Chicagos Long Liberal Tradition

Acknowledgments

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226130699
Author:
Helgeson, Jeffrey
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Subject:
General History
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Publication Date:
20140431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 halftones, 8 maps, 4 line drawings
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Crucibles of Black Empowerment: Chicago's Neighborhood Politics from the New Deal to Harold Washington (Historical Studies of Urban America) New Hardcover
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Product details 368 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226130699 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Jeffrey Helgeson shows how twentieth-century black Chicagoans created and sustained race-conscious institutions and politics. Some of the city’s prominent political and cultural figures play roles in this story, but Helgeson focuses mostly on people who worked and lived outside the spotlight. Helgeson uncovers the domestic workers and housewives who organized their neighbors; the skilled building tradesmen who used connections to federal officials to create opportunities in a deeply discriminatory sector; the social workers, personnel managers, and journalists who carved out positions in the white-collar workforce while trying to use their position to open jobs to black workers. The results of these efforts remain open to debate—community institutions crumbled even as Harold Washington rose to become mayor—but, Helgeson shows, black Chicagoans engaged with the institutions of urban life in ways and to a degree not previously understood.

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