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Other titles in the Historical Studies of Urban America series:

A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850-1950 (Historical Studies of Urban America)

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A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850-1950 (Historical Studies of Urban America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

American cities are constantly being built and rebuilt, resulting in ever-changing skylines and neighborhoods. While the dynamic urban landscapes of New York, Boston, and Chicago have been widely studied, there is much to be gleaned from west coast cities, especially in California, where the migration boom at the end of the nineteenth century permanently changed the urban fabric of these newly diverse, plural metropolises.

Inand#160;A City for Children, Marta Gutman focuses on the use and adaptive reuse of everyday buildings in Oakland, California, to make the city a better place for children. She introduces us to the women who were determined to mitigate the burdens placed on working-class families by an indifferent industrial capitalist economy. Often without the financial means to build from scratch, women did not tend to conceive of urban land as a blank slate to be wiped clean for development. Instead, Gutman shows how, over and over, women turned private houses in Oakland into orphanages, kindergartens, settlement houses, and day care centers, and in the process built the charitable landscapeand#151;a network of places that was critical for the betterment of children, families, and public life.and#160; The industrial landscape of Oakland, riddled with the effects of social inequalities and racial prejudices, is not a neutral backdrop in Gutmanand#8217;s story but an active player. Spanning one hundred years of history,and#160;A City for Childrenand#160;provides a compelling model for building urban institutions and demonstrates that children, women, charity, and incremental construction, renovations, alterations, additions, and repurposed structures are central to the understanding of modern cities.

Synopsis:

We like to say that our cities have been shaped by andldquo;creative destructionandrdquo;andmdash;the vast powers of capitalism to remake cities. But Marta Gutman shows that other forces played roles in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as cities responded to industrialization and the onset of modernity. Gutman focuses on the use and adaptive reuse of everyday buildings, and most tellingly she reveals the determinative roles of women and charitable institutions. In Oakland, Gutman shows, private houses were often adapted for charity work and the betterment of children, in the process becoming critical sites for public life and for the development of sustainable social environments. Gutman makes a strong argument for the centrality of incremental construction and the power of women-run organizations to our understanding of modern cities.

About the Author

Marta Gutman

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

ONE / New Ideas from Old Things in Oakland

TWO / The Landscape of Charity in California: First Imprints in San Francisco

THREE / The Ladies Intervene: Repurposed and Purpose-Built in Temescal

FOUR / The West Oakland Home: The and#8220;Noble Work for a Life Savingand#8221; of Rebecca McWade

FIVE / The Saloon That Became a School: Free Kindergartens in Northern California

SIX / The Art and Craft of Settlement Work in Oakland Point

SEVEN / and#8220;The Ground Must Belong to the Cityand#8221;: Playgrounds and Recreation Centers in Oaklandand#8217;s Neighborhoods

EIGHT / Orphaned in Oakland: Institutional Life during the Progressive Era

NINE / Childhood on the Color Line in West Oakland: Day Nurseries during the Interwar Years

Epilogue

Oral Histories and Interviews

Abbreviations Used in the Notes

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226311289
Author:
Gutman, Marta
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Publication Date:
20140931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
120 halftones, 14 line drawings
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » History » Modern (late 19th Century to 1945)
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850-1950 (Historical Studies of Urban America) New Hardcover
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Product details 448 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226311289 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
We like to say that our cities have been shaped by andldquo;creative destructionandrdquo;andmdash;the vast powers of capitalism to remake cities. But Marta Gutman shows that other forces played roles in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as cities responded to industrialization and the onset of modernity. Gutman focuses on the use and adaptive reuse of everyday buildings, and most tellingly she reveals the determinative roles of women and charitable institutions. In Oakland, Gutman shows, private houses were often adapted for charity work and the betterment of children, in the process becoming critical sites for public life and for the development of sustainable social environments. Gutman makes a strong argument for the centrality of incremental construction and the power of women-run organizations to our understanding of modern cities.

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