Mega Dose
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Brian Doyle: IMG The Rude Burl of Our Masks



One day when I was 12 years old and setting off on my newspaper route after school my mom said will you stop at the doctor's and pick up something... Continue »
  1. $13.27 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    Children and Other Wild Animals

    Brian Doyle 9780870717543

spacer

On Order

$44.50
New Hardcover
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Military- World War II General

Other titles in the Chicago Series in Law and Society series:

Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II (Chicago Series in Law and Society)

by

Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II (Chicago Series in Law and Society) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the spring of 1942, the federal government forced West Coast Japanese Americans into detainment camps on suspicion of disloyalty. Two years later, after stripping them of their livelihoods, liberty, and dignity, the government demanded even more by drafting them into the same military that had been guarding them as subversives. Most of these American citizens grudgingly complied with the draft, but several hundred refused and practiced a different sort of American patriotism-the patriotism of protest.

Free to Die for Their Country is the first book to tell the powerful story of the men who rejected the government's demands. Based on years of research and personal interviews with the resisters, their families, and their supporters and detractors, Eric L. Muller's work recreates the welter of emotions and events that followed the arrival of the draft notices in 1944: the untenable situation of the Japanese American men caught between national loyalty and personal indignation; the hypocrisy of the government in asking men to die for their country when it had denied them their rights as citizens; the shoddy trials of the protesters that produced convictions and imprisonment; and the treatment of the resisters by the Japanese American community, who looked upon them as pariahs who were hindering progress toward assimilation.

Muller looks behind the horrible story of the internment camps to find a tale less well known and even more troubling, illuminating a dark corner of American history during World War II. Affecting and clear eyed, Free to Die for Their Country reveals, in almost cinematic fashion, an untold chapter of our recent past.

Book News Annotation:

Muller (law, U. of N. Carolina, Chapel Hill) is the son of a Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany who escaped to the U.S. and were later subjected to some of the same restrictions as West Coast Japanese Americans during WWII. Knowing about the internment of Japanese Americans, Muller was surprised to learn of the Japanese American draft resisters. Drawing on years of research, interviews with the resisters, their families, their supporters, and their detractors, Muller presents this analysis of the draft resisters' experiences, from the arrival of the draft notices in 1944 to the recent debates in the Japanese American community over the choice these young men made over 50 years ago. Academic, but accessible to the general reader.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

One of the Washington Post's Top Nonfiction Titles of 2001

In the spring of 1942, the federal government forced West Coast Japanese Americans into detainment camps on suspicion of disloyalty. Two years later, the government demanded even more, drafting them into the same military that had been guarding them as subversives. Most of these Americans complied, but Free to Die for Their Country is the first book to tell the powerful story of those who refused. Based on years of research and personal interviews, Eric L. Muller re-creates the emotions and events that followed the arrival of those draft notices, revealing a dark and complex chapter of America's history.

About the Author

Eric L. Muller is the Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law in Jurisprudence and Ethics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

1. Untold Patriotism

2. Uneasy Welcome

3. Injury

4. Insult to Injury

5. Reaction

6. Jails within Jails

7. A Shock to the Conscience

8. Incarceration Redux

9. Pardon?

Afterword

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226548227
Foreword:
Inouye, Daniel K.
Author:
Inouye, Daniel K.
Author:
Muller, Eric L.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Location:
Chicago
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
Minority Studies - Ethnic American
Subject:
Japanese Americans
Subject:
Conscientious objectors
Subject:
World War, 19
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Asian American Studies
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Edition Description:
1
Series:
The Chicago series in law and society
Series Volume:
106-28
Publication Date:
20011031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
250
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Prisoners Without Trial: Japanese... Used Trade Paper $8.00
  2. Clifford and the Big Parade... Used Pamphlet $2.50
  3. Subterranean Fire: A History of... New Trade Paper $16.00
  4. Making Patriots New Trade Paper $20.95
  5. Confronting the War Machine: Draft... New Trade Paper $37.75
  6. Lies My Teacher Told Me
    Used Trade Paper $5.50

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Japanese American
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II (Chicago Series in Law and Society) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$44.50 Backorder
Product details 250 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226548227 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
One of the Washington Post's Top Nonfiction Titles of 2001

In the spring of 1942, the federal government forced West Coast Japanese Americans into detainment camps on suspicion of disloyalty. Two years later, the government demanded even more, drafting them into the same military that had been guarding them as subversives. Most of these Americans complied, but Free to Die for Their Country is the first book to tell the powerful story of those who refused. Based on years of research and personal interviews, Eric L. Muller re-creates the emotions and events that followed the arrival of those draft notices, revealing a dark and complex chapter of America's history.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.