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Other titles in the Historical Studies of Urban America series:

Faces Along the Bar: Lore and Order in the Workingman's Saloon, 1870-1920 (Historical Studies of Urban America)

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Faces Along the Bar: Lore and Order in the Workingman's Saloon, 1870-1920 (Historical Studies of Urban America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this lively, witty, and engaging history, Madelon Powers recreates the daily life of the barroom, exploring what it was like to be a "regular" in the old-time saloon of pre-prohibition industrial America. Powers concentrates on the turbulent years from 1870 to 1920 when the industrial revolution wrenched and reshaped American society and its working-class institutions. During its heyday, the urban barroom was widely acknowledged as the workingman's "club". Yet it had no written rules for membership, no formal hierarchy, and no fixed agenda. What, then, Powers asks, was the exact nature of this so-called club?<P>Powers examines the lives of saloongoers across America, including those in major cities such as New York, Chicago, New Orleans, and San Francisco as well as smaller cities such as Sioux City, Shoshone, and Oakland. Her investigation offers a fascinating look at the rich lore of the barroom — its many games, stories, songs, free lunch customs, and especially its elaborate system of drinking rituals that have been passed on for decades. She shows how urban workers used saloons as places to promote their political, social, and economic objectives; saloons were where union leaders first organized their members, machine politicians cultivated the workingman's vote, and immigrants sought the assistance of their countrymen. She also discusses how gender, ethnicity, and class played significant roles in determining the club's membership.<P>Powers concludes that an underlying code of reciprocity and peer group honor in saloon life unified the regulars and transformed them into a voluntary association. Thus, amid the fumes of beer and cigars, the regulars were able to cultivate thedual benefits of communal companionship and marketplace clout, making the old-time saloon one of the most versatile, ubiquitous, and controversial institutions in American history.

Book News Annotation:

Focusing on the decades during which rapid industrialization was wrenching and reshaping US society, Powers (history, U. of New Orleans) explores the culture of working-class drinking establishments and the people who frequented them, and how they both reflected and impacted the larger society in which they were embedded and from which they grew. She draws on her background in anthropology to place the informal evidence in context. Some fine old photographs--her inspiration for the study--are included. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

In this lively and engaging history, Madelon Powers recreates the daily life of the barroom, exploring what it was like to be a "regular" in the old-time saloon of pre-prohibition industrial America. Through an examination of saloongoers across America, her investigation offers a fascinating look at rich lore of the barroom—its many games, stories, songs, free lunch customs, and especially its elaborate system of drinking rituals that have been passed on for decades.

"A free-pouring blend of astonishing facts, folklore and firsthand period observations. . . . It's the rich details that'll inspire the casual reader to drink deep from this tap of knowledge."—Don Waller, USA Today recommended reading

"A surprise on every page."—Publishers Weekly

"Here we get social history that appreciates the bar talk even while dissecting its marvelous rituals."—Library Journal, starred review

"Careful scholarship with an anecdotal flair to please even the most sober of readers."—Nina C. Ayoub, Chronicle of Higher Education

Synopsis:

In this lively and engaging history, Madelon Powers recreates the daily life of the barroom, exploring what it was like to be a "regular" in the old-time saloon of pre-prohibition industrial America. Through an examination of saloongoers across America, her investigation offers a fascinating look at rich lore of the barroom&#8212;its many games, stories, songs, free lunch customs, and especially its elaborate system of drinking rituals that have been passed on for decades.

"A free-pouring blend of astonishing facts, folklore and firsthand period observations. . . . It's the rich details that'll inspire the casual reader to drink deep from this tap of knowledge."&#8212;Don Waller, USA Today recommended reading

"A surprise on every page."&#8212;Publishers Weekly

"Here we get social history that appreciates the bar talk even while dissecting its marvelous rituals."&#8212;Library Journal, starred review

"Careful scholarship with an anecdotal flair to please even the most sober of readers."&#8212;Nina C. Ayoub, Chronicle of Higher Education

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Pt. I: The Criteria for Comradeship

1: The Importance of Being Regular

2: Gender, Age, and Marital Status

3: Occupation, Ethnicity, and Neighborhood

Pt. II: The Gentle Art of Clubbing

4: Drinking Folkways

5: Clubbing by Treat

6: Clubbing by Collection

Pt. III: More Lore of the Barroom

7: Games and Gambling

8: Talk and Storytelling

9: Songs and Singing

10: The Free Lunch

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226677682
Author:
Powers, Madelon
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Location:
Chicago :
Subject:
Social life and customs
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Sociology - Urban
Subject:
Customs & Traditions
Subject:
United States - 19th Century/Turn of the Century
Subject:
1865-1898
Subject:
Bars (Drinking establishments)
Subject:
United States Social life and customs 20th century.
Subject:
Drinking customs -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Subject:
United States Social life and customs.
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Publication Date:
19980831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
15 halftones
Pages:
331
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1860 to 1920
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century

Faces Along the Bar: Lore and Order in the Workingman's Saloon, 1870-1920 (Historical Studies of Urban America) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 331 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226677682 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
In this lively and engaging history, Madelon Powers recreates the daily life of the barroom, exploring what it was like to be a "regular" in the old-time saloon of pre-prohibition industrial America. Through an examination of saloongoers across America, her investigation offers a fascinating look at rich lore of the barroom—its many games, stories, songs, free lunch customs, and especially its elaborate system of drinking rituals that have been passed on for decades.

"A free-pouring blend of astonishing facts, folklore and firsthand period observations. . . . It's the rich details that'll inspire the casual reader to drink deep from this tap of knowledge."—Don Waller, USA Today recommended reading

"A surprise on every page."—Publishers Weekly

"Here we get social history that appreciates the bar talk even while dissecting its marvelous rituals."—Library Journal, starred review

"Careful scholarship with an anecdotal flair to please even the most sober of readers."—Nina C. Ayoub, Chronicle of Higher Education

"Synopsis" by ,
In this lively and engaging history, Madelon Powers recreates the daily life of the barroom, exploring what it was like to be a "regular" in the old-time saloon of pre-prohibition industrial America. Through an examination of saloongoers across America, her investigation offers a fascinating look at rich lore of the barroom&#8212;its many games, stories, songs, free lunch customs, and especially its elaborate system of drinking rituals that have been passed on for decades.

"A free-pouring blend of astonishing facts, folklore and firsthand period observations. . . . It's the rich details that'll inspire the casual reader to drink deep from this tap of knowledge."&#8212;Don Waller, USA Today recommended reading

"A surprise on every page."&#8212;Publishers Weekly

"Here we get social history that appreciates the bar talk even while dissecting its marvelous rituals."&#8212;Library Journal, starred review

"Careful scholarship with an anecdotal flair to please even the most sober of readers."&#8212;Nina C. Ayoub, Chronicle of Higher Education

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