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Other titles in the Historical Studies of Urban America series:

Block by Block: Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago's West Side (Historical Studies of Urban America)

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Block by Block: Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago's West Side (Historical Studies of Urban America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Block by Block, Amanda I. Seligman examines the responses of whites in the West Side communities of Chicago to the racial transformation occurring in their neighborhoods in the decades following World War II. Seligman's account illuminates that deterioration in these areas in fact began long before the color of their inhabitants changed from white to black. This book is essential to understanding how the "flight" of whites to the suburbs, and even the 1960s riots, were responses to developments in Chicago's physical and social landscape, occurring one block at a time.

"Seligman's deeply researched and well-focused study of race and residence in postwar Chicago usefully stretches the discussion in three directions. Geographically, she provides a real service by concentrating on the city's understudied West Side. Second, she carries the story down to the mid-1970s, significantly extending our field of vision. Finally, she removes the housing issue from its traditional policy vacuum. These are all welcome developments that will generate questions to engage scholars for years to come."and#8212;Arnold R. Hirsch, author of Making the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960

"A fascinating account of Chicago's West Side in the postwar era. Based on a wide range of sources Block by Block tells the story of a city in flux and residents trying to cope with changes occurring all around them. The emergence of a West Side ghetto is seen within the very real national and local political limits of the Daley era."andlt;Dominic A. Pacyga, author of Polish Immigrants and Industrial Chicago: Workers on the South Sideandgt;

"A creative reinterpretation of the postwar urban crisis, Seligman's book challenges the one-dimensional portrait of Chicago's West Side. Her multiplicity of stories and experiences makes this a very rich urban history. Original and useful, Block by Block is an important contribution to postwar urban historiography."andlt;Becky Nicolaides, author of My Blue Heaven: Life and Politics in the Working-Class Suburbs of Los Angeles, 1920-1965andgt;

Synopsis:

Benjamin Looker investigates the cultural, social, and economic complexities of the idea of andldquo;neighborhoodandrdquo; in postwar America. In the face of urban decline, competing visions of the city neighborhoodandrsquo;s significance and purpose became proxies for broader debates over the meaning and limits of American democracy. Looker examines radically different neighborhood visionsandmdash;by urban artists, critics, writers, and activistsandmdash;to show how sociological debates over what neighborhood values resonated in art, political discourse, and popular culture. The neighborhood-andmdash;both the epitome of urban life and, in its insularity, an escape from itandmdash;was where twentieth-century urban Americans worked out solutions to tensions between atomization or overcrowding, harsh segregation or stifling statism, ethnic assimilation or cultural fragmentation.

Synopsis:

Despite the pundits who have written its epitaph and the latter-day refugees who have fled its confines for the half-acre suburban estate, the city neighborhood has endured as an idea central to American culture. In A Nation of Neighborhoods, Benjamin Looker presents us with the city neighborhood as both an endless problem and a possibility.

Looker investigates the cultural, social, and political complexities of the idea of andldquo;neighborhoodandrdquo; in postwar America and how Americans grappled with vast changes in their urban spaces from World War II to the Reagan era. In the face of urban decline, competing visions of the city neighborhoodandrsquo;s significance and purpose became proxies for broader debates over the meaning and limits of American democracy. By studying the way these contests unfolded across a startling variety of genresandmdash;Broadway shows, radio plays, urban ethnographies, real estate documents, and even childrenandrsquo;s programmingandmdash;Looker shows that the neighborhood ideal has functioned as a central symbolic site for advancing and debating theories about American national identity and democratic practice.

Synopsis:

In Block by Block, Amanda I. Seligman examines the responses of whites in the West Side communities of Chicago to the racial transformation occurring in their neighborhoods in the decades following World War II. Seligman's account illuminates that deterioration in these areas in fact began long before the color of their inhabitants changed from white to black. This book is essential to understanding how the "flight" of whites to the suburbs, and even the 1960s riots, were responses to developments in Chicago's physical and social landscape, occurring one block at a time.

"Seligman's deeply researched and well-focused study of race and residence in postwar Chicago usefully stretches the discussion in three directions. Geographically, she provides a real service by concentrating on the city's understudied West Side. Second, she carries the story down to the mid-1970s, significantly extending our field of vision. Finally, she removes the housing issue from its traditional policy vacuum. These are all welcome developments that will generate questions to engage scholars for years to come."—Arnold R. Hirsch, author of Making the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960

"A fascinating account of Chicago's West Side in the postwar era. Based on a wide range of sources Block by Block tells the story of a city in flux and residents trying to cope with changes occurring all around them. The emergence of a West Side ghetto is seen within the very real national and local political limits of the Daley era."<Dominic A. Pacyga, author of Polish Immigrants and Industrial Chicago: Workers on the South Side>

"A creative reinterpretation of the postwar urban crisis, Seligman's book challenges the one-dimensional portrait of Chicago's West Side. Her multiplicity of stories and experiences makes this a very rich urban history. Original and useful, Block by Block is an important contribution to postwar urban historiography."<Becky Nicolaides, author of My Blue Heaven: Life and Politics in the Working-Class Suburbs of Los Angeles, 1920-1965>


About the Author

Amanda I. Seligman is assistant professor of history and urban studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Acronyms in Text

Introduction: Block by Block

1. Chicago's West Side

2. Housing Codes

3. Conservation and Urban Renewal

4. A Chicago Campus for the University of Illinois

5. Public Schools

6. Blockbusting

7. Keeping African Americans Out

8. Keeping Whites In

Epilogue: Reconsidering White Flight

Acronyms in Notes

Archival Collections

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226746630
Author:
Seligman, Amanda I.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Looker, Benjamin
Subject:
City and town life
Subject:
History
Subject:
Sociology - Urban
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Midwest
Subject:
Public Policy - City Planning & Urban Dev.
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.) Race relations History.
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.) Social conditions.
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Publication Date:
20050531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
25 halftones, 1 line drawing
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » City Specific
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Block by Block: Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago's West Side (Historical Studies of Urban America) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$99.25 Backorder
Product details 432 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226746630 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Benjamin Looker investigates the cultural, social, and economic complexities of the idea of andldquo;neighborhoodandrdquo; in postwar America. In the face of urban decline, competing visions of the city neighborhoodandrsquo;s significance and purpose became proxies for broader debates over the meaning and limits of American democracy. Looker examines radically different neighborhood visionsandmdash;by urban artists, critics, writers, and activistsandmdash;to show how sociological debates over what neighborhood values resonated in art, political discourse, and popular culture. The neighborhood-andmdash;both the epitome of urban life and, in its insularity, an escape from itandmdash;was where twentieth-century urban Americans worked out solutions to tensions between atomization or overcrowding, harsh segregation or stifling statism, ethnic assimilation or cultural fragmentation.
"Synopsis" by ,
Despite the pundits who have written its epitaph and the latter-day refugees who have fled its confines for the half-acre suburban estate, the city neighborhood has endured as an idea central to American culture. In A Nation of Neighborhoods, Benjamin Looker presents us with the city neighborhood as both an endless problem and a possibility.

Looker investigates the cultural, social, and political complexities of the idea of andldquo;neighborhoodandrdquo; in postwar America and how Americans grappled with vast changes in their urban spaces from World War II to the Reagan era. In the face of urban decline, competing visions of the city neighborhoodandrsquo;s significance and purpose became proxies for broader debates over the meaning and limits of American democracy. By studying the way these contests unfolded across a startling variety of genresandmdash;Broadway shows, radio plays, urban ethnographies, real estate documents, and even childrenandrsquo;s programmingandmdash;Looker shows that the neighborhood ideal has functioned as a central symbolic site for advancing and debating theories about American national identity and democratic practice.

"Synopsis" by , In Block by Block, Amanda I. Seligman examines the responses of whites in the West Side communities of Chicago to the racial transformation occurring in their neighborhoods in the decades following World War II. Seligman's account illuminates that deterioration in these areas in fact began long before the color of their inhabitants changed from white to black. This book is essential to understanding how the "flight" of whites to the suburbs, and even the 1960s riots, were responses to developments in Chicago's physical and social landscape, occurring one block at a time.

"Seligman's deeply researched and well-focused study of race and residence in postwar Chicago usefully stretches the discussion in three directions. Geographically, she provides a real service by concentrating on the city's understudied West Side. Second, she carries the story down to the mid-1970s, significantly extending our field of vision. Finally, she removes the housing issue from its traditional policy vacuum. These are all welcome developments that will generate questions to engage scholars for years to come."—Arnold R. Hirsch, author of Making the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940-1960

"A fascinating account of Chicago's West Side in the postwar era. Based on a wide range of sources Block by Block tells the story of a city in flux and residents trying to cope with changes occurring all around them. The emergence of a West Side ghetto is seen within the very real national and local political limits of the Daley era."<Dominic A. Pacyga, author of Polish Immigrants and Industrial Chicago: Workers on the South Side>

"A creative reinterpretation of the postwar urban crisis, Seligman's book challenges the one-dimensional portrait of Chicago's West Side. Her multiplicity of stories and experiences makes this a very rich urban history. Original and useful, Block by Block is an important contribution to postwar urban historiography."<Becky Nicolaides, author of My Blue Heaven: Life and Politics in the Working-Class Suburbs of Los Angeles, 1920-1965>


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