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Original Essays | September 30, 2014

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Searching for Sasquatch (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology)

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Searching for Sasquatch (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

How does science treat evidence from the edges? This fresh and entertaining look at the search for Sasquatch concerns more than just the startling and controversial nature of monsters and monster hunting in the late twentieth century, but the more important relationship between the professional scientists and amateur naturalists who hunt them—and their place in the history of science. The traditional heroic narrative of monster-hunting situates mainstream, academic scientists (the eggheads) as villains rejecting the existence of anomalous primates and cryptozoology as unworthy of study. It gives a privileged place to passionate amateur naturalists (the crackpots) who soldier on against great odds, and the obstinacy of the mainstream to bring knowledge of these creatures to light. Brian Regal shows this model to be inaccurate: many professional scientists eagerly sought anomalous primates, examining their traces and working out evolutionary paradigms to explain them. Even though scientific thinking held that anomalous primates—Bigfoot, Sasquatch, Yeti—did not and could not exist, these scientists risked their careers because they believed these creature to be a genuine biological reality.

Synopsis:

How does science treat evidence from the edges? This fresh and entertaining look at the search for Sasquatch concerns more than just the startling and controversial nature of monsters and monster hunting in the late twentieth century, but the more important relationship between the professional scientists and amateur naturalists who hunt them—and their place in the history of science. The traditional heroic narrative of monster-hunting situates mainstream, academic scientists (the eggheads) as villains rejecting the existence of anomalous primates and cryptozoology as unworthy of study. It gives a privileged place to passionate amateur naturalists (the crackpots) who soldier on against great odds, and the obstinacy of the mainstream to bring knowledge of these creatures to light. Brian Regal shows this model to be inaccurate: many professional scientists eagerly sought anomalous primates, examining their traces and working out evolutionary paradigms to explain them. Even though scientific thinking held that anomalous primates—Bigfoot, Sasquatch, Yeti—did not and could not exist, these scientists risked their careers because they believed these creature to be a genuine biological reality.

Synopsis:

Bigfoot hunters and their brethren are often depicted as outcasts, misfits, or passionate amateurs toiling in solitude. But has this always been the case? This fresh and entertaining study looks at the surprisingly complex relationship between professional scientists and cryptozoologists. The traditional heroic narrative of monster-hunting in the late twentieth century treats mainstream, academic scientists (the eggheads) as villains who reject the possibility of anomalous primates and cryptozoology as unworthy of study. It gives a privileged place to passionate amateur naturalists (the crackpots) who soldier on against great odds and an obstinate public to bring knowledge of these creatures to light. However, as historian Brian Regal shows, this is misleading: many professional scientists eagerly sought anomalous primates, examining their traces and working out evolutionary paradigms to explain them. Even though scientific thinking held that creatures such as Bigfoot, Sasquatch, and Yeti did not and could not exist, these scientists risked their careers because they believed them to be a genuine biological reality.

About the Author

Brian Regal is an Assistant Professor for the History of Science at Kean University, New Jersey.  His previous works include Henry Fairfield Osborn: Race and the Search for the Origins of Man, “Entering Dubious Realms: Grover Krantz, Science and Sasquatch,” and Pseudoscience: A Critical Encyclopedia.

Table of Contents

Chasing Monsters * Crackpots and Eggheads * The Snowmen * Bigfoot, the Anti-Krantz, and the Iceman * The Life of Grover Krantz * Suits and Ladders * The Problems of Evidence * A Life with Monsters

Product Details

ISBN:
9780230111479
Author:
Regal, Brian
Publisher:
Palgrave MacMillan
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
History
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
World History-1650 to Present
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
n/a
Pages:
262
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
Metaphysics » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Zoology » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Searching for Sasquatch (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology) New Hardcover
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Product details 262 pages Palgrave MacMillan - English 9780230111479 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
How does science treat evidence from the edges? This fresh and entertaining look at the search for Sasquatch concerns more than just the startling and controversial nature of monsters and monster hunting in the late twentieth century, but the more important relationship between the professional scientists and amateur naturalists who hunt them—and their place in the history of science. The traditional heroic narrative of monster-hunting situates mainstream, academic scientists (the eggheads) as villains rejecting the existence of anomalous primates and cryptozoology as unworthy of study. It gives a privileged place to passionate amateur naturalists (the crackpots) who soldier on against great odds, and the obstinacy of the mainstream to bring knowledge of these creatures to light. Brian Regal shows this model to be inaccurate: many professional scientists eagerly sought anomalous primates, examining their traces and working out evolutionary paradigms to explain them. Even though scientific thinking held that anomalous primates—Bigfoot, Sasquatch, Yeti—did not and could not exist, these scientists risked their careers because they believed these creature to be a genuine biological reality.
"Synopsis" by ,
Bigfoot hunters and their brethren are often depicted as outcasts, misfits, or passionate amateurs toiling in solitude. But has this always been the case? This fresh and entertaining study looks at the surprisingly complex relationship between professional scientists and cryptozoologists. The traditional heroic narrative of monster-hunting in the late twentieth century treats mainstream, academic scientists (the eggheads) as villains who reject the possibility of anomalous primates and cryptozoology as unworthy of study. It gives a privileged place to passionate amateur naturalists (the crackpots) who soldier on against great odds and an obstinate public to bring knowledge of these creatures to light. However, as historian Brian Regal shows, this is misleading: many professional scientists eagerly sought anomalous primates, examining their traces and working out evolutionary paradigms to explain them. Even though scientific thinking held that creatures such as Bigfoot, Sasquatch, and Yeti did not and could not exist, these scientists risked their careers because they believed them to be a genuine biological reality.
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