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Marie Curie and Her Daughters: The Private Lives of Science's First Family (Macsci)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Published to widespread acclaim, in Marie Curie and Her Daughters, science writer Shelley Emling shows that far from a shy introvert toiling away in her laboratory, the famed scientist and two-time Nobel prize winner was nothing short of an iconoclast. Emling draws on personal letters released by Curies only granddaughter to show how Marie influenced her daughters yet let them blaze their own paths: Irene followed her mothers footsteps into science and was instrumental in the discovery of nuclear fission; Eve traveled the world as a foreign correspondent and then moved on to humanitarian missions. Emling also shows how Curie, following World War I, turned to America for help. Few people know about Curies close friendship with American journalist Missy Meloney, who arranged speaking tours across the country for Marie, Eve, and Irene. Months on the road, charming audiences both large and small, endeared the Curies to American women and established a lifelong relationship with the United States that formed one of the strongest connections of Maries life. Factually rich, personal, and original, this is an engrossing story about the most famous woman in science that rips the cover off the myth and reveals the real person, friend, and mother behind it.

Review:

"Science writer Emling (The Fossil Hunter) reveals a hidden side of the life of two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, co-discoverer of radioactivity and the first to use it as an experimental treatment for cancer. Her plainly told tale relates Curie's struggles to balance her passion for discovery and arduous work as a scientist after her husband and collaborator Pierre's death with the equally challenging task of raising two daughters. Drawing on newly available letters between Marie and her daughters, and extensive interviews with Marie's granddaughter, Hélène Langevin-Joliot, Emling shows Marie as a loving if often absent mother who encouraged her daughters to pursue their own ideas and passions. Her older daughter, Irene, won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1935 for her work with her husband, Frédéric, in developing synthetic radioactivity; Marie's younger daughter, Eve, had a flourishing career as an international journalist and humanitarian who in later life worked with UNICEF. In this admiring family tale, Emling also reveals for the first time the key role American journalist Missy Meloney played in first bringing Marie Curie on her first trip to America, where she was received by adoring crowds, and then helping spearhead campaigns to raise much needed money to support Marie's work. Photos. Agent: Agnes Birnbaum, Bleecker Street Associates." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

"A compulsively readable biography of Curie and her formidable daughters." —Ms. magazine

Synopsis:

Published to widespread acclaim, in Marie Curie and Her Daughters, science writer Shelley Emling shows that far from a shy introvert toiling away in her laboratory, the famed scientist and two-time Nobel prize winner was nothing short of an iconoclast. Emling draws on personal letters released by Curies only granddaughter to show how Marie influenced her daughters yet let them blaze their own paths: Irene followed her mothers footsteps into science and was instrumental in the discovery of nuclear fission; Eve traveled the world as a foreign correspondent and then moved on to humanitarian missions. Emling also shows how Curie, following World War I, turned to America for help. Few people know about Curies close friendship with American journalist Missy Meloney, who arranged speaking tours across the country for Marie, Eve, and Irene. Months on the road, charming audiences both large and small, endeared the Curies to American women and established a lifelong relationship with the United States that formed one of the strongest connections of Maries life. Factually rich, personal, and original, this is an engrossing story about the most famous woman in science that rips the cover off the myth and reveals the real person, friend, and mother behind it.

Synopsis:

A new portrait of the two time Nobel winner—drawing on family letters newly released by Marie Curies granddaughter

 

Marie Curie discovered the mysterious element radium, became the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize, and remains the only person to have won two Nobel Prizes in different science fields. Born in Poland, she prevailed despite scandals and a xenophobic establishment that looked down on immigrants and women. But she was also a mother, widowed young, who raised two extraordinary daughters alone: Irene, a Nobel Prize winning chemist whose discoveries helped pave the way for the atom bomb, and Eve, a highly regarded humanitarian and foreign correspondent. What was life like in this family of extraordinary women? Highly acclaimed science writer Shelley Emling draws on personal interviews with Curie's granddaughter and personal family correspondence to bring the three women to life. Among the revelations contained in this book is the little known fundraising trip to the United States, organized by Missy Meloney, an American journalist, that changed Maries science and the story of the atomic age.

About the Author

Shelley Emling has written for the The New York Times, USA Today, Fortune, Slate, The Wall Street Journal, The Times (London), The Huffington Post, FoxNews.com, Beliefnet.com, The Christian Science Monitor, and the International Herald Tribune. She launched one of the first blogs for the International Herald Tribune, called Raising the Roof. She is the author of the highly acclaimed The Fossil Hunter and lives in Montclair, New Jersey.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780230115712
Author:
Emling, Shelley
Publisher:
Palgrave MacMillan
Subject:
History
Subject:
Science & Technology
Subject:
Europe - France
Subject:
World History-France
Subject:
Biography-Scientists
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8 pages on regular stock
Pages:
248
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in 1 lb

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Marie Curie and Her Daughters: The Private Lives of Science's First Family (Macsci) New Hardcover
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$26.00 In Stock
Product details 248 pages Palgrave MacMillan - English 9780230115712 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Science writer Emling (The Fossil Hunter) reveals a hidden side of the life of two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, co-discoverer of radioactivity and the first to use it as an experimental treatment for cancer. Her plainly told tale relates Curie's struggles to balance her passion for discovery and arduous work as a scientist after her husband and collaborator Pierre's death with the equally challenging task of raising two daughters. Drawing on newly available letters between Marie and her daughters, and extensive interviews with Marie's granddaughter, Hélène Langevin-Joliot, Emling shows Marie as a loving if often absent mother who encouraged her daughters to pursue their own ideas and passions. Her older daughter, Irene, won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1935 for her work with her husband, Frédéric, in developing synthetic radioactivity; Marie's younger daughter, Eve, had a flourishing career as an international journalist and humanitarian who in later life worked with UNICEF. In this admiring family tale, Emling also reveals for the first time the key role American journalist Missy Meloney played in first bringing Marie Curie on her first trip to America, where she was received by adoring crowds, and then helping spearhead campaigns to raise much needed money to support Marie's work. Photos. Agent: Agnes Birnbaum, Bleecker Street Associates." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

"A compulsively readable biography of Curie and her formidable daughters." —Ms. magazine

"Synopsis" by , Published to widespread acclaim, in Marie Curie and Her Daughters, science writer Shelley Emling shows that far from a shy introvert toiling away in her laboratory, the famed scientist and two-time Nobel prize winner was nothing short of an iconoclast. Emling draws on personal letters released by Curies only granddaughter to show how Marie influenced her daughters yet let them blaze their own paths: Irene followed her mothers footsteps into science and was instrumental in the discovery of nuclear fission; Eve traveled the world as a foreign correspondent and then moved on to humanitarian missions. Emling also shows how Curie, following World War I, turned to America for help. Few people know about Curies close friendship with American journalist Missy Meloney, who arranged speaking tours across the country for Marie, Eve, and Irene. Months on the road, charming audiences both large and small, endeared the Curies to American women and established a lifelong relationship with the United States that formed one of the strongest connections of Maries life. Factually rich, personal, and original, this is an engrossing story about the most famous woman in science that rips the cover off the myth and reveals the real person, friend, and mother behind it.
"Synopsis" by ,

A new portrait of the two time Nobel winner—drawing on family letters newly released by Marie Curies granddaughter

 

Marie Curie discovered the mysterious element radium, became the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize, and remains the only person to have won two Nobel Prizes in different science fields. Born in Poland, she prevailed despite scandals and a xenophobic establishment that looked down on immigrants and women. But she was also a mother, widowed young, who raised two extraordinary daughters alone: Irene, a Nobel Prize winning chemist whose discoveries helped pave the way for the atom bomb, and Eve, a highly regarded humanitarian and foreign correspondent. What was life like in this family of extraordinary women? Highly acclaimed science writer Shelley Emling draws on personal interviews with Curie's granddaughter and personal family correspondence to bring the three women to life. Among the revelations contained in this book is the little known fundraising trip to the United States, organized by Missy Meloney, an American journalist, that changed Maries science and the story of the atomic age.

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