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Postcolonial Melancholia

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In "Postcolonial Melancholia," Paul Gilroy continues the conversation he began in his landmark study of race and nation, "'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack," "'" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine-and defend-multiculturalism within the context of a post-9/11 "politics of security." Gilroy adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. His unorthodox analysis pinpoints melancholic reactions not only in the hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but also in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on seminal discussions of race by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance and proposes that it is possible to celebrate multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

Synopsis:

In an effort to deny the ongoing effect of colonialism and imperialism on contemporary political life, the death knell for a multicultural society has been sounded from all sides. That's the provocative argument Paul Gilroy makes in this unorthodox defense of the multiculture. Gilroy's searing analyses of race, politics, and culture have always remained attentive to the material conditions of black people and the ways in which blacks have defaced the clean edifice of white supremacy. In Postcolonial Melancholia, he continues the conversation he began in the landmark study of race and nation 'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack' by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine — and defend — multiculturalism within the context of the post-9/11 politics of security.

This book adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it not to individual grief but to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. The melancholic reactions that have obstructed the process of working through the legacy of colonialism are implicated not only in hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on the seminal discussions of race begun by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy crafts a nuanced argument with far-reaching implications. Ultimately, Postcolonial Melancholia goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance to propose that it is possible to celebrate the multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

Synopsis:

In this book, public intellectual and critic Paul Gilroy continues the conversation on race and nation he began in "Ain't No Black in the Union Jack" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine — and defend — multiculturalism within the context of the post-9/11 "politics of security." Drawing on the seminal discussions of race begun by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance to propose that it is possible to celebrate multiculturalism and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

Synopsis:

In "Postcolonial Melancholia," Paul Gilroy continues the conversation he began in his landmark study of race and nation, "'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack," "'" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine-and defend-multiculturalism within the context of a post-9/11 "politics of security."

Gilroy adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. His unorthodox analysis pinpoints melancholic reactions not only in the hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but also in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on seminal discussions of race by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance and proposes that it is possible to celebrate multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.In "Postcolonial Melancholia," Paul Gilroy continues the conversation he began in his landmark study of race and nation, "'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack," "'" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine-and defend-multiculturalism within the context of a post-9/11 "politics of security."

Gilroy adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. His unorthodox analysis pinpoints melancholic reactions not only in the hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but also in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on seminal discussions of race by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance and proposes that it is possible to celebrate multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231134545
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Subject:
Political
Author:
Gilroy, Paul
Subject:
Sociology - Social Theory
Subject:
Pluralism (social sciences)
Subject:
Minorities
Subject:
Minority Studies - Race Relations
Subject:
Race discrimination
Subject:
National characteristics, british
Subject:
Cultural pluralism - Great Britain
Subject:
Colonialism & Post-Colonialism
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Racism and Ethnic Conflict
Subject:
Sociology - General
Publication Date:
20041231
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9.30x6.28x.69 in. .86 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Politics » Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Postcolonial Melancholia
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Product details 192 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231134545 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In an effort to deny the ongoing effect of colonialism and imperialism on contemporary political life, the death knell for a multicultural society has been sounded from all sides. That's the provocative argument Paul Gilroy makes in this unorthodox defense of the multiculture. Gilroy's searing analyses of race, politics, and culture have always remained attentive to the material conditions of black people and the ways in which blacks have defaced the clean edifice of white supremacy. In Postcolonial Melancholia, he continues the conversation he began in the landmark study of race and nation 'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack' by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine — and defend — multiculturalism within the context of the post-9/11 politics of security.

This book adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it not to individual grief but to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. The melancholic reactions that have obstructed the process of working through the legacy of colonialism are implicated not only in hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on the seminal discussions of race begun by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy crafts a nuanced argument with far-reaching implications. Ultimately, Postcolonial Melancholia goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance to propose that it is possible to celebrate the multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

"Synopsis" by , In this book, public intellectual and critic Paul Gilroy continues the conversation on race and nation he began in "Ain't No Black in the Union Jack" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine — and defend — multiculturalism within the context of the post-9/11 "politics of security." Drawing on the seminal discussions of race begun by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance to propose that it is possible to celebrate multiculturalism and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.
"Synopsis" by , In "Postcolonial Melancholia," Paul Gilroy continues the conversation he began in his landmark study of race and nation, "'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack," "'" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine-and defend-multiculturalism within the context of a post-9/11 "politics of security."

Gilroy adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. His unorthodox analysis pinpoints melancholic reactions not only in the hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but also in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on seminal discussions of race by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance and proposes that it is possible to celebrate multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.In "Postcolonial Melancholia," Paul Gilroy continues the conversation he began in his landmark study of race and nation, "'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack," "'" by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine-and defend-multiculturalism within the context of a post-9/11 "politics of security."

Gilroy adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. His unorthodox analysis pinpoints melancholic reactions not only in the hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but also in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on seminal discussions of race by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance and proposes that it is possible to celebrate multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

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