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      Death and Mr. Pickwick

      Stephen Jarvis 9780374139667

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More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Centennial series:

Mexican Chicago: Race, Identity and Nation, 1916-39

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Mexican Chicago: Race, Identity and Nation, 1916-39  Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Synopsis:

Mexican Chicago builds on previous studies of Mexicans in the United States while challenging static definitions of “American” and underlying assumptions of assimilation. Gabriela F. Arredondo contends that because of the revolutionary context from which they came, Mexicans in Chicago between 1916 and 1939 were not just another ethnic group working to be assimilated into a city that has a long history of incorporating newcomers. Suggesting a new understanding of identity formation, she argues that Mexicans wielded tools of identification forged in revolutionary Mexico to collectively battle the prejudices of ethnic groups that included Poles, Italians, and the Irish, as well as African Americans. By turning inward, however, Mexicans also highlighted tremendous differences among themselves, such as gender and class. In discussing this distinctive process of becoming “Mexican” in Chicago during the early twentieth century, Arredondo not only explores how that identity was constructed but also provides telling insight into the repercussions of that identity formation process.

Synopsis:

Becoming Mexican in early-twentieth-century Chicago

About the Author

Gabriela Arredondo is an associate professor of Latin American and Latina/o Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, and coeditor of Chicana Feminisms: Disruptions in Dialogue.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780252074974
Author:
Arredondo, Gabriela F.
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Hispanic American Studies
Subject:
SOC044000
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Midwest
Subject:
United States - 20th Century (1900-1945)
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.) Race relations History.
Subject:
Mexican Americans - Illinois - Chicago -
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Hispanic American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Centennial
Publication Date:
20080431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
22 photographs; 6 line drawings
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.7 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Hispanic American Studies
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Mexican Chicago: Race, Identity and Nation, 1916-39 New Trade Paper
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Product details 272 pages University of Illinois Press - English 9780252074974 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Mexican Chicago builds on previous studies of Mexicans in the United States while challenging static definitions of “American” and underlying assumptions of assimilation. Gabriela F. Arredondo contends that because of the revolutionary context from which they came, Mexicans in Chicago between 1916 and 1939 were not just another ethnic group working to be assimilated into a city that has a long history of incorporating newcomers. Suggesting a new understanding of identity formation, she argues that Mexicans wielded tools of identification forged in revolutionary Mexico to collectively battle the prejudices of ethnic groups that included Poles, Italians, and the Irish, as well as African Americans. By turning inward, however, Mexicans also highlighted tremendous differences among themselves, such as gender and class. In discussing this distinctive process of becoming “Mexican” in Chicago during the early twentieth century, Arredondo not only explores how that identity was constructed but also provides telling insight into the repercussions of that identity formation process.

"Synopsis" by ,

Becoming Mexican in early-twentieth-century Chicago

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