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Making Jews Modern: The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires (Modern Jewish Experience)

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Making Jews Modern: The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires (Modern Jewish Experience) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"An engaging and thought-provoking analysis,... a pioneering foray into a new field of study, 'Jews and Empires in History.'" --Slavic Review

On the eve of the 20th century, Jews in the Russian and Ottoman empires were caught up in the major cultural and social transformations that constituted modernity for Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jewries. What did it mean to be Jewish and Russian, Jewish and Ottoman, Jewish and modern? To answer these questions, Sarah Abrevaya Stein explores the texts most widely consumed by Jewish readers: popular newspapers in Yiddish and Ladino. This skillful comparative study yields new perspectives on the role of print culture in imagining national and transnational communities and the diverse ways in which modernity was envisioned under the rule of empire.

Synopsis:

On the eve of the 20th century, Jews in the Russian and Ottoman empires were caught up in the major cultural and social transformations that constituted modernity for Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jewries, respectively. What language should Jews speak or teach their children? Should Jews acculturate, and if so, into what regional or European culture? What did it mean to be Jewish and Russian, Jewish and Ottoman, Jewish and modern? Sarah Abrevaya Stein explores how such questions were formulated and answered within these communities by examining the texts most widely consumed by Jewish readers: popular newspapers in Yiddish and Ladino. Examining the press's role as an agent of historical change, she interrogates a diverse array of verbal and visual texts, including cartoons, photographs, and advertisements. This original and lively study yields new perspectives on the role of print culture in imagining national and transnational communities; Stein's work enriches our sense of cultural life under the rule of multiethnic empires and complicates our understanding of Europe's polyphonic modernities.

Synopsis:

Analyzes how the Jewish popular press in the Russian and Ottoman empires helped construct modern Jewish identities

About the Author

Sarah Abrevaya Stein is Associate Professor of History at the University of Washington.

Table of Contents

List of Figures

Acknowledgments

Note on Transliterations, Dates, and Terms

Introduction: Making Jews Modern

Part One. The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires

1. Creating a Yiddish Newspaper Culture

2. Creating a Ladino Newspaper Culture

Part Two. Imaging Culture

3. Iconographies of Agitation

4. The Science of Healthy Living

Part Three. Advertising Aspiration

5. Images of Daily Life

6. Advertising Anxiety

Epilogue

Notes

Works Cited

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780253218933
Subtitle:
The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires
Author:
Stein, Sarah Abrevaya
Credits:
Smith, Liz
Credits:
Yelland, David
Credits:
Lowe, Arthur
Credits:
Jarvis, Martin
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Location:
Bloomington, IN
Subject:
Journalism
Subject:
Jewish - General
Subject:
Journalism-Reference
Subject:
Jewish
Subject:
Eurasian Studies; East European; History; Jewish Studies; Jewish Studies Russian; Journalism; Middle East; Middle Eastern Studies; Russia; Russian
Edition Description:
Print PDF
Series:
Modern Jewish Experience
Publication Date:
20061020
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
48 bandw photos
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
9.4 x 5.1 x 0.82 in

Related Subjects

Business » Communication
Business » General
History and Social Science » Journalism » Reference
Religion » Judaism » History
Religion » Judaism » Jewish History

Making Jews Modern: The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires (Modern Jewish Experience) New Trade Paper
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Product details 328 pages Indiana University Press - English 9780253218933 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , On the eve of the 20th century, Jews in the Russian and Ottoman empires were caught up in the major cultural and social transformations that constituted modernity for Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jewries, respectively. What language should Jews speak or teach their children? Should Jews acculturate, and if so, into what regional or European culture? What did it mean to be Jewish and Russian, Jewish and Ottoman, Jewish and modern? Sarah Abrevaya Stein explores how such questions were formulated and answered within these communities by examining the texts most widely consumed by Jewish readers: popular newspapers in Yiddish and Ladino. Examining the press's role as an agent of historical change, she interrogates a diverse array of verbal and visual texts, including cartoons, photographs, and advertisements. This original and lively study yields new perspectives on the role of print culture in imagining national and transnational communities; Stein's work enriches our sense of cultural life under the rule of multiethnic empires and complicates our understanding of Europe's polyphonic modernities.
"Synopsis" by ,
Analyzes how the Jewish popular press in the Russian and Ottoman empires helped construct modern Jewish identities
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