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Other titles in the History of Computing series:

Strategic Computing: Darpa and the Quest for Machine Intelligence, 1983-1993 (History of Computing)

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Strategic Computing: Darpa and the Quest for Machine Intelligence, 1983-1993 (History of Computing) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;This is the story of an extraordinary effort by the U.S. Department of Defense to hasten the advent of "machines that think." From 1983 to 1993, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) spent an extra and#36;1 billion on computer research aimed at achieving artificial intelligence. The Strategic Computing Initiative (SCI) was conceived as an integrated plan to promote computer chip design and manufacture, computer architecture, and artificial intelligence software. What distinguished SCI from other large-scale technology programs was that it self-consciously set out to advance an entire research front. The SCI succeeded in fostering significant technological successes, even though it never achieved machine intelligence. The goal provided a powerful organizing principle for a suite of related research programs, but it did not solve the problem of coordinating these programs. In retrospect, it is hard to see how it could have.In Strategic Computing, Alex Roland and Philip Shiman uncover the roles played in the SCI by technology, individuals, and social and political forces. They explore DARPA culture, especially the information processing culture within the agency, and they evaluate the SCI's accomplishments and set them in the context of overall computer development during this period. Their book is an important contribution to our understanding of the complex sources of contemporary computing.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

The story of the U.S. Department of Defense's extraordinary effort, in the period from 1983 to 1993, to achieve machine intelligence.

Synopsis:

In Strategic Computing, Alex Roland and Philip Shiman uncover the roles played in the SCI by technology, individuals, and social and political forces. They explore DARPA culture, especially the information processing culture within the agency, and they evaluate the SCI's accomplishments and set them in the context of overall computer development during this period. Their book is an important contribution to our understanding of the complex sources of contemporary computing.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;The story of the U.S. Department of Defense's extraordinary effort, in the period from 1983 to 1993, to achieve machine intelligence.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [333]-396) and index.

Synopsis:

This is the story of an extraordinary effort by the U.S. Department of Defense to hasten the advent of "machines that think." From 1983 to 1993, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) spent an extra $1 billion on computer research aimed at achieving artificial intelligence. The Strategic Computing Initiative (SCI) was conceived as an integrated plan to promote computer chip design and manufacture, computer architecture, and artificial intelligence software. What distinguished SCI from other large-scale technology programs was that it self-consciously set out to advance an entire research front. The SCI succeeded in fostering significant technological successes, even though it never achieved machine intelligence. The goal provided a powerful organizing principle for a suite of related research programs, but it did not solve the problem of coordinating these programs. In retrospect, it is hard to see how it could have.In Strategic Computing, Alex Roland and Philip Shiman uncover the roles played in the SCI by technology, individuals, and social and political forces. They explore DARPA culture, especially the information processing culture within the agency, and they evaluate the SCI's accomplishments and set them in the context of overall computer development during this period. Their book is an important contribution to our understanding of the complex sources of contemporary computing.

About the Author

Alex Roland is Professor of History at Duke University.Philip Shiman is a member of the Defense Acquisition History Project, a government-sponsored team researching defense acquisition from 1945 to the present.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262182263
Subtitle:
DARPA and the Quest for Machine Intelligence, 1983-1993
Author:
Roland, Alex
Author:
Shiman, Philip
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge, Mass.
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Artificial Intelligence
Subject:
High performance computing
Subject:
Data Processing - General
Subject:
Artificial Intelligence - General
Subject:
Aspects
Subject:
Intelligence (AI) & Semantics
Subject:
Computers Reference-History and Society
Series:
History of Computing Strategic Computing
Series Volume:
P-D51
Publication Date:
20020913
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
31 illus.
Pages:
456
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Artificial Intelligence » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
Reference » Science Reference » General

Strategic Computing: Darpa and the Quest for Machine Intelligence, 1983-1993 (History of Computing) New Hardcover
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Product details 456 pages MIT Press - English 9780262182263 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The story of the U.S. Department of Defense's extraordinary effort, in the period from 1983 to 1993, to achieve machine intelligence.
"Synopsis" by , In Strategic Computing, Alex Roland and Philip Shiman uncover the roles played in the SCI by technology, individuals, and social and political forces. They explore DARPA culture, especially the information processing culture within the agency, and they evaluate the SCI's accomplishments and set them in the context of overall computer development during this period. Their book is an important contribution to our understanding of the complex sources of contemporary computing.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;The story of the U.S. Department of Defense's extraordinary effort, in the period from 1983 to 1993, to achieve machine intelligence.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [333]-396) and index.
"Synopsis" by , This is the story of an extraordinary effort by the U.S. Department of Defense to hasten the advent of "machines that think." From 1983 to 1993, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) spent an extra $1 billion on computer research aimed at achieving artificial intelligence. The Strategic Computing Initiative (SCI) was conceived as an integrated plan to promote computer chip design and manufacture, computer architecture, and artificial intelligence software. What distinguished SCI from other large-scale technology programs was that it self-consciously set out to advance an entire research front. The SCI succeeded in fostering significant technological successes, even though it never achieved machine intelligence. The goal provided a powerful organizing principle for a suite of related research programs, but it did not solve the problem of coordinating these programs. In retrospect, it is hard to see how it could have.In Strategic Computing, Alex Roland and Philip Shiman uncover the roles played in the SCI by technology, individuals, and social and political forces. They explore DARPA culture, especially the information processing culture within the agency, and they evaluate the SCI's accomplishments and set them in the context of overall computer development during this period. Their book is an important contribution to our understanding of the complex sources of contemporary computing.
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