Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | October 21, 2014

    Anne Rice: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Anne Rice



    These are the songs that wake me up, take me out of my worries and anxieties, wash my brain cells, and send me to the keyboard to write with new... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Film and Television- Film History and Theory

More copies of this ISBN

Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life (Boston Review Books)

by

Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life (Boston Review Books) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For Alan Stone, a one-time Freudian analyst and former president of the American Psychiatric Society, movies are the great modern, democratic medium for exploring our individual and collective lives. They provide occasions for reflecting on what he calls "the moral adventure of life": the choices people make--beyond the limits of their character and circumstances--in response to life's challenges. The quality of these choices is, for him, the measure of a life well lived. In this collection of his film essays, Stone reads films as life texts. He is engaged more by their ideas than their visual presentation, more by their power to move us than by their commercial success. Stone writes about both art films and big-budget Hollywood blockbusters. And he commands an extraordinary range of historical, literary, cultural, and scientific reference that reflects his impressive personal history: professor of law and medicine, football player at Harvard in the late 1940s, director of medical training at McLean Hospital, and advisor to Attorney General Janet Reno on behavioral science. In the end, Stone's enthusiasms run particularly to films that embrace the sheer complexity of life, and in doing so enlarge our sense of human possibilities: in Antonia's Line, he sees an emotionally vivid picture of a world beyond patriarchy; in Thirteen Conversations about One Thing, the power of sheer contingency in human life; and in American Beauty, how beauty in ordinary experience draws us outside ourselves, and how beauty and justice are distinct goods, with no intrinsic connection. Other films discussed in these essays (written between 1993 and 2006 for Boston Review) include Un Coeur en Hiver, Schindler's List, Pulp Fiction, Thirteen Days, the 1997 version of Lolita, The Battle of Algiers, The Passion of the Christ, Persuasion, and Water. Alan A. Stone is Touroff-Glueck Professor of Law and Psychiatry at Harvard University and a former president of the American Psychiatric Society.

Review:

"Stone has had an illustrious career in psychiatry: he was president of the American Psychiatric Society and director of medical training at McLean Hospital in Massachusetts, and is currently professor of Law and Psychiatry at Harvard. The 15 essays on individual films collected here were published in the Boston Review from 1993-2006. The foreword from Boston Review editor Joshua Cohen notes that Stone's 'enthusiasms run particularly to films that enlarge our sense of human possibilities.' The result is a book that sees Schindler's List as a film in which Spielberg's 'accomplishments cannot be gainsaid' (and in which the director is 'vindicated as a director and a Jew') and that views The Battle of Algiers as fundamentalist propaganda. American Beauty points up the failure of beauty 'to draw virtue from the flames,' while Pulp Fiction 'unmasks the macho myth by making it laughable and deheroicizes the kind of power glorified by Hollywood violence.' Stone's writing is thoughtful, but the humanism that Cohen points to in the foreword proves more of a limit here than a lens." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Films as life lessons, enlarging our sense of human possibilities.

Synopsis:

For Alan Stone, a one-time Freudian analyst and former president of the American Psychiatric Society, movies are the great modern, democratic medium for exploring our individual and collective lives. They provide occasions for reflecting on what he calls the moral adventure of life the choices people make--beyond the limits of their character and circumstances--in response to life's challenges. The quality of these choices is, for him, the measure of a life well lived.

About the Author

Alan A. Stone is Touroff-Glueck Professor of Law and Psychiatry at Harvard University and a former president of the American Psychiatric Association.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262195676
Author:
Stone, Alan A
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Foreword by:
Cohen, Joshua
Foreword:
Cohen, Josh
Foreword:
Cohen, Joshua
Author:
Cohen, Joshua
Author:
Stone, Alan A.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Cohen, Josh
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Film & Video - History & Criticism
Subject:
Film & Video - General
Subject:
Film - General
Subject:
Motion pictures
Subject:
Moral and ethical aspects
Subject:
Motion pictures -- Moral and ethical aspects.
Subject:
Film and Television-History and Criticism
Copyright:
Series:
Boston Review Books Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life
Publication Date:
20070817
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7 x 4.5 x 0.6875 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Film History and Theory
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism

Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life (Boston Review Books) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Mit Press - English 9780262195676 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Stone has had an illustrious career in psychiatry: he was president of the American Psychiatric Society and director of medical training at McLean Hospital in Massachusetts, and is currently professor of Law and Psychiatry at Harvard. The 15 essays on individual films collected here were published in the Boston Review from 1993-2006. The foreword from Boston Review editor Joshua Cohen notes that Stone's 'enthusiasms run particularly to films that enlarge our sense of human possibilities.' The result is a book that sees Schindler's List as a film in which Spielberg's 'accomplishments cannot be gainsaid' (and in which the director is 'vindicated as a director and a Jew') and that views The Battle of Algiers as fundamentalist propaganda. American Beauty points up the failure of beauty 'to draw virtue from the flames,' while Pulp Fiction 'unmasks the macho myth by making it laughable and deheroicizes the kind of power glorified by Hollywood violence.' Stone's writing is thoughtful, but the humanism that Cohen points to in the foreword proves more of a limit here than a lens." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Films as life lessons, enlarging our sense of human possibilities.
"Synopsis" by , For Alan Stone, a one-time Freudian analyst and former president of the American Psychiatric Society, movies are the great modern, democratic medium for exploring our individual and collective lives. They provide occasions for reflecting on what he calls the moral adventure of life the choices people make--beyond the limits of their character and circumstances--in response to life's challenges. The quality of these choices is, for him, the measure of a life well lived.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.