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Linguistic Inquiry Monographs #22: Morphology by Itself: Stems and Inflectional Classes

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Linguistic Inquiry Monographs #22: Morphology by Itself: Stems and Inflectional Classes Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Most recent research in generative morphology has avoided the treatment of purely morphological phenomena and has focused instead on interface questions, such as the relation between morphology and syntax or between morphology and phonology. In this monograph Mark Aronoff argues that linguists must consider morphology by itself, not merely as an appendage of syntax and phonology, and that linguistic theory must allow for a separate and autonomous morphological component.Following a general introductory chapter, Aronoff examines two narrow classes of morphological phenomena to make his case: stems and inflectional classes. Concentrating first on Latin verb morphology, he argues that morphological stems are neither syntactic nor phonological units. Next,using data from a number of languages, he underscores the traditional point that the inflectional class of a word is not reducible to its syntactic gender. He then explores in detail the phonologically motivated nominal inflectional class system of two languages of Papua New Guinea (Arapeshand Yimas) and the precise nature of the relation between this system and the corresponding gender system. Finally,drawing on a number of Semitic languages, Aronoff argues that the verb classes of these languages are purely inflectional although they are partly motivated by derivational and syntactic considerations. Mark Aronoff is Professor of Linguistics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Synopsis:

Following a general introductory chapter, Aronoff examines two narrow classes of morphological phenomena to make his case: stems and inflectional classes. Concentrating first on Latin verb morphology, he argues that morphological stems are neither syntactic nor phonological units. Next, using data from a number of languages, he underscores the traditional point that the inflectional class of a word is not reducible to its syntactic gender. He then explores in detail the phonologically motivated nominal inflectional class system of two languages of Papua New Guinea (Arapeshand Yimas) and the precise nature of the relation between this system and the corresponding gender system. Finally, drawing on a number of Semitic languages, Aronoff argues that the verb classes of these languages are purely inflectional although they are partly motivated by derivational and syntactic considerations. Mark Aronoff is Professor of Linguistics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Synopsis:

In this monograph Mark Aronoff argues that linguists must consider morphology by itself, not merely as an appendage of syntax and phonology, and that linguistic theory must allow for a separate and autonomous morphological component.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-206) and index.

About the Author

Mark Aronoff is Chairman of the Linguistics Department at SUNY, Stony Brook and the author of Word Formation in Generative Grammar (MIT Press, 1976).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262510721
Author:
Aronoff, Mark
Publisher:
Mit Press
Author:
ff
Author:
Mark Arono
Location:
Cambridge, Mass. :
Subject:
Grammar
Subject:
Linguistics
Subject:
Grammar, Comparative and general
Subject:
Grammar, Comparative and general -- Inflection.
Subject:
Inflection
Subject:
Grammar & Punctuation
Subject:
Linguistics - General
Subject:
Reference-Grammar and Style
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Linguistic Inquiry Monographs Morphology by Itself
Series Volume:
947522
Publication Date:
19931231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Reference » Words Phrases and Language

Linguistic Inquiry Monographs #22: Morphology by Itself: Stems and Inflectional Classes New Trade Paper
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Product details 192 pages MIT Press - English 9780262510721 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Following a general introductory chapter, Aronoff examines two narrow classes of morphological phenomena to make his case: stems and inflectional classes. Concentrating first on Latin verb morphology, he argues that morphological stems are neither syntactic nor phonological units. Next, using data from a number of languages, he underscores the traditional point that the inflectional class of a word is not reducible to its syntactic gender. He then explores in detail the phonologically motivated nominal inflectional class system of two languages of Papua New Guinea (Arapeshand Yimas) and the precise nature of the relation between this system and the corresponding gender system. Finally, drawing on a number of Semitic languages, Aronoff argues that the verb classes of these languages are purely inflectional although they are partly motivated by derivational and syntactic considerations. Mark Aronoff is Professor of Linguistics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.
"Synopsis" by , In this monograph Mark Aronoff argues that linguists must consider morphology by itself, not merely as an appendage of syntax and phonology, and that linguistic theory must allow for a separate and autonomous morphological component.
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