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Other titles in the Basic Bioethics series:

Ethics of the Body Postconventional CH

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Ethics of the Body Postconventional CH Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The provocative contention of the postmodernist and feminist essays in Ethics of the Body is that conventional bioethics is out of touch, despite its growing profile. It is out of touch with an ongoing phenomenological sense of bodies themselves; with the impact of postmodernist theory as it problematizes the certainties of binary thinking; and with a postmodern culture in which bioscientific developments force us to question what is meant by the notion of the human self. The authors demonstrate that the conventional normative framework of bioethics is called into question by issues as wide ranging as genetic manipulation, disability, high-tech prosthetics, and intersexuality. The essays show how both the theory and practice of bioethics can benefit from postmodernism's characteristic fluidity and multiplicity, as well as from the insights of a reconceived feminist bioethics. They address issues in philosophy, law, bioscientific research, psychiatry, cultural studies, and feminism from a "postconventional" perspective that looks beyond the familiar ideas of the body, proposing not a bioethics about the body but a radical ethics of the body.

After exploring notions of difference in both feminist and postmodernist terms, the book considers specific issues—including HIV, addiction, borderline personality disorder, and cancer—that challenge the principles of conventional bioethics. The focus then turns to questions raised by biotechnology: one essay rethinks the traditional feminist ethics of care in the context of new reproductive technology, while others tackle genetic and genomic issues. Finally, the book looks at embodiment and some specifically anomalous forms of being-in-the-body, including a consideration of intersex infants and children that draws on feminist, postructuralist, and queer theory.

Synopsis:

After exploring notions of difference in both feminist and postmodernist terms, the book considers specific issues — including HIV, addiction, borderline personality disorder, and cancer — that challenge the principles of conventional bioethics. The focus then turns to questions raised by biotechnology: one essay rethinks the traditional feminist ethics of care in the context of new reproductive technology, while others tackle genetic and genomic issues. Finally, the book looks at embodiment and some specifically anomalous forms of being-in-the-body, including a consideration of intersex infants and children that draws on feminist, postructuralist, and queer theory.

Synopsis:

Essays approach bioethics from postmodernist feminist theoretical perspectives, opening it to critiques that question the traditional normative framework.

Synopsis:

The provocative contention of the postmodernist and feminist essays in

Synopsis:

The provocative contention of the postmodernist and feminist essays in Ethics of the Body is that conventional bioethics is out of touch, despite its growing profile. It is out of touch with an ongoing phenomenological sense of bodies themselves; with the impact of postmodernist theory as it problematizes the certainties of binary thinking; and with a postmodern culture in which bioscientific developments force us to question what is meant by the notion of the human self. The authors demonstrate that the conventional normative framework of bioethics is called into question by issues as wide ranging as genetic manipulation, disability, high-tech prosthetics, and intersexuality. The essays show how both the theory and practice of bioethics can benefit from postmodernism's characteristic fluidity and multiplicity, as well as from the insights of a reconceived feminist bioethics. They address issues in philosophy, law, bioscientific research, psychiatry, cultural studies, and feminism from a "postconventional" perspective that looks beyond the familiar ideas of the body, proposing not a bioethics about the body but a radical ethics of the body.After exploring notions of difference in both feminist and postmodernist terms, the book considers specific issues — including HIV, addiction, borderline personality disorder, and cancer — that challenge the principles of conventional bioethics. The focus then turns to questions raised by biotechnology: one essay rethinks the traditional feminist ethics of care in the context of new reproductive technology, while others tackle genetic and genomic issues. Finally, the book looks at embodiment and some specifically anomalous forms of being-in-the-body, including a consideration of intersex infants and children that draws on feminist, postructuralist, and queer theory.

About the Author

Margrit Shildrick is Senior Research Visiting Fellow at WERRC, University College Dublin.Roxanne Mykitiuk is Associate Professor of Law at Osgoode Hall Law School at York University, Toronto.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262693202
Subtitle:
Postconventional Challenges
Editor:
Shildrick, Margrit
Editor:
Shildrick, Margrit
Editor:
Mykitiuk, Roxanne
Author:
Shildrick, Margrit
Author:
Mykitiuk, Roxanne
Editor:
Mykitiuk, Roxanne
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Business Ethics
Subject:
Bioethics
Subject:
Ethics
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Basic Bioethics Ethics of the Body
Publication Date:
20050520
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » General
Business » Ethics
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Politics of Health Care
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Professional Medical Reference
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Ethics of the Body Postconventional CH New Trade Paper
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Product details 328 pages MIT Press - English 9780262693202 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , After exploring notions of difference in both feminist and postmodernist terms, the book considers specific issues — including HIV, addiction, borderline personality disorder, and cancer — that challenge the principles of conventional bioethics. The focus then turns to questions raised by biotechnology: one essay rethinks the traditional feminist ethics of care in the context of new reproductive technology, while others tackle genetic and genomic issues. Finally, the book looks at embodiment and some specifically anomalous forms of being-in-the-body, including a consideration of intersex infants and children that draws on feminist, postructuralist, and queer theory.
"Synopsis" by , Essays approach bioethics from postmodernist feminist theoretical perspectives, opening it to critiques that question the traditional normative framework.
"Synopsis" by , The provocative contention of the postmodernist and feminist essays in
"Synopsis" by , The provocative contention of the postmodernist and feminist essays in Ethics of the Body is that conventional bioethics is out of touch, despite its growing profile. It is out of touch with an ongoing phenomenological sense of bodies themselves; with the impact of postmodernist theory as it problematizes the certainties of binary thinking; and with a postmodern culture in which bioscientific developments force us to question what is meant by the notion of the human self. The authors demonstrate that the conventional normative framework of bioethics is called into question by issues as wide ranging as genetic manipulation, disability, high-tech prosthetics, and intersexuality. The essays show how both the theory and practice of bioethics can benefit from postmodernism's characteristic fluidity and multiplicity, as well as from the insights of a reconceived feminist bioethics. They address issues in philosophy, law, bioscientific research, psychiatry, cultural studies, and feminism from a "postconventional" perspective that looks beyond the familiar ideas of the body, proposing not a bioethics about the body but a radical ethics of the body.After exploring notions of difference in both feminist and postmodernist terms, the book considers specific issues — including HIV, addiction, borderline personality disorder, and cancer — that challenge the principles of conventional bioethics. The focus then turns to questions raised by biotechnology: one essay rethinks the traditional feminist ethics of care in the context of new reproductive technology, while others tackle genetic and genomic issues. Finally, the book looks at embodiment and some specifically anomalous forms of being-in-the-body, including a consideration of intersex infants and children that draws on feminist, postructuralist, and queer theory.
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