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Frankly, My Dear: Gone with the Wind Revisited

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Frankly, My Dear: Gone with the Wind Revisited Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

How and why has the saga of Scarlett OHara kept such a tenacious hold on our national imagination for almost three-quarters of a century? In the first book ever to deal simultaneously with Margaret Mitchells beloved novel and David Selznicks spectacular film version of Gone with the Wind, film critic Molly Haskell seeks the answers. By all industry predictions, the film should never have worked. What makes it work so amazingly well are the fascinating and uncompromising personalities that Haskell dissects here: Margaret Mitchell, David Selznick, and Vivien Leigh. As a feminist and onetime Southern adolescent, Haskell understands how the story takes on different shades of meaning according to the age and eye of the beholder. She explores how it has kept its edge because of Margaret Mitchells (and our) ambivalence about Scarlett and because of the complex racial and sexual attitudes embedded in a story that at one time or another has offended almost everyone.

Haskell imaginatively weaves together disparate strands, conducting her story as her own inner debate between enchantment and disenchantment. Sensitive to the ways in which history and cinema intersect, she reminds us why these characters, so riveting to Depression audiences, continue to fascinate 70 years later.

Review:

"In time for the 70th anniversary of the film version, author and movie critic Haskell (Holding My Own in No Man's Land) brings a scholar's rigor to her loving history of our 'American Bible,' Gone With the Wind. Vivid profiles of author Margaret Mitchell, starlet Vivien Leigh, and film producer David Selznick re-humanize the work, now known more for its epic grandeur, iconic moments and controversial politics. Haskell draws thoughtful parallels between Mitchell and her protagonist, Scarlett O'Hara, and her affection for these women drives a narrative that gets occasionally bogged down in film production minutiae. Haskell falters while trying to defend Mitchell's dialog and gender politics, even going so far as to imply that she understands Mitchell and O'Hara in a way that other critics do not (Roger Ebert, for instance). Haskell also highlights the impact of the film on popular culture, but doesn't bring anything new to the discussion of America's fascination. Though perhaps too finely focused for casual readers, this sincere, detailed celebration should interest long-time fans and students." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Why should we give a damn about "Gone With the Wind," a moss-covered cultural landmark long since rooted and constantly pruned in pop culture, academia and filmdom? Its 1,000-plus-page book version and 226-minute film version are too sprawling, too dredged, too sundry to address altogether, in a fresh and compelling way, in one fell swoop.

Yet that is what critic Molly Haskell does... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

About the Author

Molly Haskell is a writer and film critic. She has lectured widely on the role of women in film and is the author of From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies. She lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300117523
Subtitle:
"Gone with the Wind" Revisited
Author:
Haskell, Molly
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Subject:
Mitchell, Margaret
Subject:
Film & Video - History & Criticism
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Film - History & Criticism
Subject:
Film and Television-History and Criticism
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Icons of America
Publication Date:
20100223
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
15 b/w illus.
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 0.7 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Specific Film
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

Frankly, My Dear: Gone with the Wind Revisited Used Hardcover
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Product details 272 pages Yale University Press - English 9780300117523 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In time for the 70th anniversary of the film version, author and movie critic Haskell (Holding My Own in No Man's Land) brings a scholar's rigor to her loving history of our 'American Bible,' Gone With the Wind. Vivid profiles of author Margaret Mitchell, starlet Vivien Leigh, and film producer David Selznick re-humanize the work, now known more for its epic grandeur, iconic moments and controversial politics. Haskell draws thoughtful parallels between Mitchell and her protagonist, Scarlett O'Hara, and her affection for these women drives a narrative that gets occasionally bogged down in film production minutiae. Haskell falters while trying to defend Mitchell's dialog and gender politics, even going so far as to imply that she understands Mitchell and O'Hara in a way that other critics do not (Roger Ebert, for instance). Haskell also highlights the impact of the film on popular culture, but doesn't bring anything new to the discussion of America's fascination. Though perhaps too finely focused for casual readers, this sincere, detailed celebration should interest long-time fans and students." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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