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1 Burnside Italy- General

Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History

by

Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History Cover

ISBN13: 9780307268440
ISBN10: 0307268446
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome—as city, as empire, and, crucially, as an origin of Western art and civilization, two subjects about which Hughes has spent his life writing and thinking.

Starting on a personal note, Hughes takes us to the Rome he first encountered as a hungry twenty-one-year-old fresh from Australia in 1959. From that exhilarating portrait, he takes us back more than two thousand years to the city's foundation, one mired in mythologies and superstitions that would inform Rome's development for centuries.

From the beginning, Rome was a hotbed of power, overweening ambition, desire, political genius, and corruption. Hughes details the turbulent years that saw the formation of empire and the establishment of the sociopolitical system, along the way providing colorful portraits of all the major figures, both political (Julius Caesar, Marcus Aurelius, Nero, Caligula) and cultural (Cicero, Martial, Virgil), to name just a few. For almost a thousand years, Rome would remain the most politically important, richest, and largest city in the Western world.

From the formation of empire, Hughes moves on to the rise of early Christianity, his own antipathy toward religion providing rich and lively context for the brutality of the early Church, and eventually the Crusades. The brutality had the desired effect—the Church consolidated and outlasted the power of empire, and Rome would be the capital of the Papal States until its annexation into the newly united kingdom of Italy in 1870.

As one would expect, Hughes lavishes plenty of critical attention on the Renaissance, providing a full survey of the architecture, painting, and sculpture that blossomed in Rome over the course of the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries, and shedding new light on old masters in the process. Having established itself as the artistic and spiritual center of the world, Rome in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries saw artists (and, eventually, wealthy tourists) from all over Europe converging on the bustling city, even while it was caught up in the nationalistic turmoils of the Italian independence struggle and war against France.

Hughes keeps the momentum going right into the twentieth century, when Rome witnessed the rise and fall of Italian Fascism and Mussolini, and took on yet another identity in the postwar years as the fashionable city of "La Dolce Vita." This is the Rome Hughes himself first encountered, and it's one he contends, perhaps controversially, has been lost in the half century since, as the cult of mass tourism has slowly ruined the dazzling city he loved so much. Equal parts idolizing, blasphemous, outraged, and awestruck, Rome is a portrait of the Eternal City as only Robert Hughes could paint it.

Review:

"With elegance and beauty, Hughes, who for three decades was Time's chief art critic, majestically conducts us through the rich history of Rome, a city he discovered as a young man, which for him gave physical form to the ideal of art and 'turned art, and history, into reality.' From its foundation to the modern world, Hughes points out the wealth of Rome's art and its influence on Roman history. For example, propaganda statues in ancient Rome perpetuated the power of leaders; the statue of the emperor Augustus, for instance, has few equals as an image of 'calm, self-sufficient power.' Hughes characterizes 19th-century Rome as a movement between orthodoxy and modernism, and reflects artists' commitment to or rejection of Italian unification. During this period, Rome was also swarming with foreign artists, notably a group of young Germans dubbed the Nazarenes for their demonstrative piety. Hughes bemoans the rampant tourism that has turned Rome into a kind of Disney World for the art set; yet the glories of the past remain. In a delightful guide, Hughes — whose The Shock of the New was recently named by Britain's Guardian one of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century — provides a sometimes cantankerous but always captivating tour through the remarkable depth and breadth of the ancient city. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

One of our greatest art and cultural critics now takes on Rome’s complicated history as a city, an empire, an origin of Western art and civilization, and as his own inspiration.

Robert Hughes opens this authoritative, searingly smart history with his own arrival in Rome in 1958, as a wide-eyed twenty-year-old from Australia. We see him blissfully plunging into the life of the city, his exhilaration palpable on the page, his life-long passion for the place bursting into being. And then he shares the breadth of that passion with us: detailing the city’s physical, political, social, and artistic evolution through the ages from its foundation to its present moment, discussing government, religion, architecture, painting, sculpture, and cinema, providing in-depth portraits of political and cultural figures (from Caesar to Mussolini and from Cicero to Fellini). Finally, he brings us up to the twenty-first century to regale us with his impressions of a city he now sees run rampant with mass and tourist culture.

Sometimes loving, sometimes enraged, never less than impassioned, sharply discerning, and delectably opinionated, Robert Hughes gives us the great city of Rome as only he can.

About the Author

Robert Hughes was born in Australia in 1938. Since 1970 he has lived and worked in the United States, where until 2001 he was chief art critic for Time, to which he still contributes. His books include The Shock of the New, The Fatal Shore, Nothing If Not Critical, Barcelona, Goya, and Things I Didn't Know. He is the recipient of a number of awards and prizes for his work.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Matthew Buckingham, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by Matthew Buckingham)
Art critic Robert Hughes turns his encyclopedic knowledge and acerbic wit on a well-worn subject in new ways that will open your eyes to the Eternal City.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780307268440
Subtitle:
A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History
Author:
Hughes, Robert
Publisher:
Knopf
Subject:
General History
Subject:
World History-European History General
Subject:
World History-Italy
Subject:
Europe - Western
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20111101
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
32 PAGES OF 4-C PHOTOGRAPHS
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.56 x 6.59 x 1.67 in 2.06 lb

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Europe » Italy » General
History and Social Science » World History » Italy

Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History Used Hardcover
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$15.95 In Stock
Product details 512 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307268440 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "With elegance and beauty, Hughes, who for three decades was Time's chief art critic, majestically conducts us through the rich history of Rome, a city he discovered as a young man, which for him gave physical form to the ideal of art and 'turned art, and history, into reality.' From its foundation to the modern world, Hughes points out the wealth of Rome's art and its influence on Roman history. For example, propaganda statues in ancient Rome perpetuated the power of leaders; the statue of the emperor Augustus, for instance, has few equals as an image of 'calm, self-sufficient power.' Hughes characterizes 19th-century Rome as a movement between orthodoxy and modernism, and reflects artists' commitment to or rejection of Italian unification. During this period, Rome was also swarming with foreign artists, notably a group of young Germans dubbed the Nazarenes for their demonstrative piety. Hughes bemoans the rampant tourism that has turned Rome into a kind of Disney World for the art set; yet the glories of the past remain. In a delightful guide, Hughes — whose The Shock of the New was recently named by Britain's Guardian one of the 100 greatest nonfiction books of the 20th century — provides a sometimes cantankerous but always captivating tour through the remarkable depth and breadth of the ancient city. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , One of our greatest art and cultural critics now takes on Rome’s complicated history as a city, an empire, an origin of Western art and civilization, and as his own inspiration.

Robert Hughes opens this authoritative, searingly smart history with his own arrival in Rome in 1958, as a wide-eyed twenty-year-old from Australia. We see him blissfully plunging into the life of the city, his exhilaration palpable on the page, his life-long passion for the place bursting into being. And then he shares the breadth of that passion with us: detailing the city’s physical, political, social, and artistic evolution through the ages from its foundation to its present moment, discussing government, religion, architecture, painting, sculpture, and cinema, providing in-depth portraits of political and cultural figures (from Caesar to Mussolini and from Cicero to Fellini). Finally, he brings us up to the twenty-first century to regale us with his impressions of a city he now sees run rampant with mass and tourist culture.

Sometimes loving, sometimes enraged, never less than impassioned, sharply discerning, and delectably opinionated, Robert Hughes gives us the great city of Rome as only he can.

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