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My Friend the Enemy

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My Friend the Enemy Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Doing Our Part

I didn't mean to do it. I just got carried away.

First I found the balloon in the bib pocket of my overalls and thought it would be fun to fill it with water from the faucet by the garage. Then I thought about finding something to throw the balloon at, and that's when my sister put the record on. Dance music blared out of our bedroom window, pulling me closer to the house as the Andrews Sisters sang,

Don't sit under the apple tree

With anyone else but me,

Anyone else but me,

Anyone else but me--No No No

Sneaking around the corner of the house between the forsythia bushes, I became patrol leader H. N. Anderson. My men crept behind me so silently I couldn't even hear them until we all crouched together under the window, hugging our grenades and listening to high heels click on the wood floor. Nice trick, I thought--the enemy's using an all-American band as cover for sabotage. But it won't work. Steady, men . . . steady . . . NOW

I leapt up and hurled my grenade through the open window. There wasn't any time to aim; all I hoped to hit was the floor. But the balloon struck the edge of the vanity mirror and exploded all over ribbons, lipstick, powder boxes, and Estelle. I stared at her for a second, seeing mainly a mouth as wide as a bathtub. Mission accomplished--now scram I dashed toward the front porch as my sister's scream sounded--low at first but zooming up like an air-raid siren. Enemy plane Take cover

Straight ahead was the old henhouse. Follow me, men The natives might give us shelter I didn't see the attack squad until they were right on top of us--trapped I dodged to the left, but a long arm reached out and yanked me up so fast my feet swung out from under me. That made me really mad. "Lemme go, you lousy Jap "

"Hey, soldier. Hey. I'm on your side. Private J. J. Lanski, U.S. Marines." As my heart slowed down, I got an eyeful of starchy khakis and the gleam of an anchor-and-globe pin on a collar. He stuck out his hand. "Shake."

From the porch Estelle hollered, "Jed Don't let her get away "

I remembered the mission and made a bolt for the woods, but Jed caught me around the middle and tucked me under his arm like a bag of flour. Then he started for the house. "Looks like you've seen some action, soldier. You'll have to tell me about it at the picnic."

But Estelle was already telling him, fast and loud. "You'll never guess what she did I was standing in front of the mirror when she hauls off and throws a water balloon through the window. Now look at me--she's ruined my dress, my hair--"

Which was baloney. The ruffle on one sleeve hung limp, but a little water couldn't wash the curl out of her hair or the sparkle from her eyes. "Oh, dry up," I muttered once my feet were on the ground.

"If only I could--"

"I think you look fine," Jed offered. "Better than fine."

They were starting to go all moony-eyed when Mom stalked out of the kitchen, wiping her hands on her apron. "What's going on?"

Estelle started off making it sound like she was Poland and I was Hitler, but Mom cut it short. "All right, all right. For heaven's sake, Hazel, you're almost twelve. Aren't you a little old for silly practical jokes?"

Questions like this don't usually expect an ans

Synopsis:

Living in fear after witnessing the bombing of Pearl Harbor, a young girl keeps watch for suspicious activity in her community, but when she discovers a frightened, American-born Japanese orphan hiding in the woods who fears being placed in an internment camp, Hazel's views are changed as a secret, special friendship begins between the two. Reprint.

Synopsis:

Hating the Japanese was simple before she met Sogoji.

Pearl Harbor was bombed on Hazel Anderson’s birthday and she’s been on the lookout for enemies ever since. She scours the skies above Mount Hood with her binoculars, hoping to make some crucial observation, or uncover the hideout of enemy spies.

But what she discovers instead is a 15-year-old orphan, hiding out, trying to avoid being sent to an internment camp. Sogoji was born in America. He’s eager to help Hazel with the war effort. Is this lonely boy really the enemy?

In this thought-provoking story of patriotism, loyalty, and belonging, Hazel must decide what it means to be a true American, and a true friend.

From the Hardcover edition.

Table of Contents

Doing our part — Hawk's nest — Riddle in the brush — Our own war hero — Enemy territory — Invitation to tea — To save the nation — House of Mitsumi — What to do about Charlie — Friendly fritters — Team — Tower — Tengu-Kakushi — Honor of the emperor — White dove — What are friends for? — Big night — Midnight clear — Fire in the sky — Tuesday patrol — Yanks are coming — Right thing — Western Union — In the rain — Game's up — When the worst happens — Mountain is forever.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307538741
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Family - Multigenerational
Author:
Cheaney, J. B.
Author:
J. B. Cheaney
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Sports & Recreation - Water Sports
Subject:
Family - Multigenerational
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
Family life
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Sports & Recreation - Water Sports
Subject:
Japanese Americans
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Children s-Reference Family and Genealogy
Subject:
Children s Middle Readers-General
Subject:
Children s Pacific Northwest-Young Adult Fiction
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20070814
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
272

Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » Military and War
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Reference » Family and Genealogy
Children's » Sports and Outdoors » Sports Fiction » Water Sports
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

My Friend the Enemy
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$ In Stock
Product details 272 pages Random House Children's Books - English 9780307538741 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Living in fear after witnessing the bombing of Pearl Harbor, a young girl keeps watch for suspicious activity in her community, but when she discovers a frightened, American-born Japanese orphan hiding in the woods who fears being placed in an internment camp, Hazel's views are changed as a secret, special friendship begins between the two. Reprint.
"Synopsis" by , Hating the Japanese was simple before she met Sogoji.

Pearl Harbor was bombed on Hazel Anderson’s birthday and she’s been on the lookout for enemies ever since. She scours the skies above Mount Hood with her binoculars, hoping to make some crucial observation, or uncover the hideout of enemy spies.

But what she discovers instead is a 15-year-old orphan, hiding out, trying to avoid being sent to an internment camp. Sogoji was born in America. He’s eager to help Hazel with the war effort. Is this lonely boy really the enemy?

In this thought-provoking story of patriotism, loyalty, and belonging, Hazel must decide what it means to be a true American, and a true friend.

From the Hardcover edition.

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