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Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family

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Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family Cover

ISBN13: 9780307587879
ISBN10: 0307587878
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Condoleezza Rice has excelled as a diplomat, political scientist, and concert pianist.  Her achievements run the gamut from helping to oversee the collapse of communism in Europe and the decline of the Soviet Union, to working to protect the country in the aftermath of 9-11, to becoming only the second woman - and the first black woman ever — to serve as Secretary of State.

 

But until she was 25 she never learned to swim.

 

Not because she wouldn't have loved to, but because when she was a little girl in Birmingham, Alabama, Commissioner of Public Safety Bull Connor decided he'd rather shut down the city's pools than give black citizens access.

 

Throughout the 1950's, Birmingham's black middle class largely succeeded in insulating their children from the most corrosive effects of racism, providing multiple support systems to ensure the next generation would live better than the last.  But by 1963, when Rice was applying herself to her fourth grader's lessons, the situation had grown intolerable.  Birmingham was an environment where blacks were expected to keep their head down and do what they were told — or face violent consequences. That spring two bombs exploded in Rice’s neighborhood amid a series of chilling Klu Klux Klan attacks.  Months later, four young girls lost their lives in a particularly vicious bombing.

 

So how was Rice able to achieve what she ultimately did?

 

Her father, John, a minister and educator, instilled a love of sports and politics.  Her mother, a teacher, developed Condoleezza’s passion for piano and exposed her to the fine arts.  From both, Rice learned the value of faith in the face of hardship and the importance of giving back to the community.  Her parents’ fierce unwillingness to set limits propelled her to the venerable halls of Stanford University, where she quickly rose through the ranks to become the university’s second-in-command.  An expert in Soviet and Eastern European Affairs, she played a leading role in U.S. policy as the Iron Curtain fell and the Soviet Union disintegrated.  Less than a decade later, at the apex of the hotly contested 2000 presidential election, she received the exciting news – just shortly before her father’s death – that she would go on to the White House as the first female National Security Advisor. 

 

As comfortable describing lighthearted family moments as she is recalling the poignancy of her mother’s cancer battle and the heady challenge of going toe-to-toe with Soviet leaders, Rice holds nothing back in this remarkably candid telling. This is the story of Condoleezza Rice that has never been told, not that of an ultra-accomplished world leader, but of a little girl – and a young woman — trying to find her place in a sometimes hostile world and of two exceptional parents, and an extended family and community, that made all the difference.

Review:

"Former secretary of state Rice only briefly treats her tenure during the second Bush administration in favor of a straightforward, reverential chronicle of her upbringing under two teachers in the segregated Deep South. Rice acknowledges upfront the complicated, intertwined history of blacks and whites in America, which lent a lightening of skin to her forebears that was looked upon favorably at the time. Her father, John Wesley Rice Jr., came from a family of well-educated itinerant preachers in Louisiana, while the family of her mother, Angelena Ray, were Birmingham, Ala., landowners; both were teachers at Fairfield Industrial High School and determined to live 'full and productive lives' in Birmingham, despite the blight of segregation (e.g., poll tests in the largely Democratic South resolved John Rice to become a lifelong Republican). Cocooned in an educational and musical environment, Rice was a high-achieving only child. Yet the encroaching racial tension broke open in Birmingham in the form of store boycotts, bombings, and demonstrations. Eventually, the family moved to Denver, where Rice attended the university, majoring first in piano then political science, due to the influence of professor and former Czech diplomat Josef Korbel. Rice moves fleetingly through her subsequent education at Notre Dame and Stanford. Swept into Washington Republican politics by Colin Powell and others, she sketches the 'wild ride' accompanying the Soviet Union's demise, but overall records a thrilling, inspiring life of achievement. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

One of America's most admired and decorated singers tells her inspiring life story, from theand#160;segregated south to the world's greatest stages.and#160;

Synopsis:

Jessye Norman is not only one of the worldand#8217;s most admired and beloved opera starsand#8212;she is an American icon whose life story is as moving and inspiring as the fictional plot triumphs she sang onstage.

Born and raised in Augusta, Georgia, a descendant of many generations of hardworking slave and free ancestors, she grew up amid the challenges of Jim Crow racism with the civil rights movement just beginning to awaken. Nurtured by a close family and tight-knit community centered on the local church, Jessye sang songs and spirituals constantly, never dreaming that it might lead to a career.and#160;Only when she watched a documentary about the legendary Marian Anderson did she first realize that singing could be a profession. Decades later, after a meteoric rise at the Berlin Opera, a long-delayed debut at the Metropolitan Opera, and forays into spirituals, blues, jazz, and other roots music, she has become one of Americaand#8217;s cultural treasures.and#160;Standand#160;Up Straight and Sing!and#160;is an inspiring womanand#8217;s account of an astonishing life.

Synopsis:

 

 

Condoleezza Rice is a person of broad and deep accomplishment.  At various times she has excelled as an expert diplomat, brilliant political scientist, and trained concert pianist.  Her achievements run the gamut from helping to oversee the collapse of the Soviet Union, to working to protect the country in the aftermath of 9-11, to becoming only the second woman - and the first black woman ever — to serve as Secretary of State.

 

But until she was 25 she never learned to swim.

 

Not because she wouldn't have loved to, but because when she was a little girl in Birmingham, Alabama, Public Safety Commissioner Bull Connor decided he'd rather shut down the city's pools than give black citizens access.

 

Throughout the 1950's, Birmingham's black middle class largely succeeded in insulating their children from the more corrosive effects of racism, providing multiple support systems to ensure the next generation would live better than the last.  But by 1963, when Rice was applying herself to her third grader's lessons, the situation had grown intolerable.  Birmingham was an environment where blacks were expected to keep their head down and do what they were told — or face violent consequences...where even the hint of protest could prompt police beatings and blasts from a fire hose... where racially motivated bombings were so common the media dubbed the city "Bombingham."

 

So how was Rice able to achieve what she ultimately did?

 

This is the story of Condoleezza Rice that has never been told, not that of an ultra-accomplished world leader, but of a little girl trying to find her place in a hostile world and of two remarkable parents – and an extended family and community – that made all the difference. On the shoulders of individuals both black and white, young Condoleezza Rice stood and looked out on a world where anything was possible — and in a way that is singularly fascinating, Extraordinary, Ordinary People takes us not just through Rice’s childhood but, also, her twenties and thirties as she builds a record of achievement that positions her for involvement in world-historical events.

 

About the Author

Condoleezza Rice was the 66th United States Secretary of State – only the second woman, and first black woman ever, to hold the office. She was also President Bush's National Security Advisor during his first term, distinguishing herself as the first woman ever to serve in that position. Before joining the Bush administration, Rice was a professor of political science at Stanford University, where she served as Provost from 1993 to 1999. During the administration of George H.W. Bush, she served as the Soviet and East European Affairs Advisor during the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the German reunification.

Table of Contents

Preludeand#160;and#160;and#160;xi

1.and#160;In the Beginningand#8212;and#8220;Great day!and#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;1

2.and#160;A Motherand#8217;s Joyand#8212;and#8220;I want two wingsand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;15

3.and#160;A Fatherand#8217;s Prideand#8212;and#8220;Evand#8217;ry time I feel the Spiritand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;35

4.and#160;Church, Spirituals, and Spiritand#8212;

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; and#8220;There is a balm in Gileadand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;57

5.and#160;Racism as It Lives and Breathesand#8212;

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; and#8220;Sometimes I feel like a motherless childand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;95

Interlude: Marian Andersonand#8212;

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; and#8220;My Lord, what a morningand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;135

6.and#160;Growing Up in Germanyand#8212;and#8220;On my journey, nowand#8221; and#160;and#160;and#160;147

7.and#160;The Singing Craft as Art Formand#8212;and#8220;Oh, Glory!and#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;180

8.and#160;The Song, the Craft, the Spirit, and the Joy!and#8212;

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; and#8220;The Lordand#8217;s Prayerand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;197

9.and#160;Woman, Life, Singerand#8212;and#8220;Ride on, King Jesusand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;221

10.and#160;And the Journey Continuesand#8212;

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; and#8220;Heand#8217;s got the whole world in His handand#8221;and#160;and#160;and#160;258

Postludeand#160;and#160;and#160;280

Codaand#160;and#160;and#160;285

Indexand#160;and#160;and#160;289

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

bonnieclyde, January 2, 2011 (view all comments by bonnieclyde)
This book presents an up-close look at growing up in the civil rights era, and the effort that went into a generation presented with the opportunity to grow and reach for the stars. Ms. Rice shares honest experiences that could have soured her attitude and left her bitter, but which she saw as a challenge. A very moving biography by one of today's outstanding leaders, and an eyeopening view of how much work it takes to succeed.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307587879
Author:
Rice, Condoleezza
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Author:
Norman, Jessye
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Political
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Biography-Political
Subject:
Composers & Musicians
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20140506
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-page b/w insert
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.22 lb

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Political
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Black Heritage
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
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Young Adult » General

Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Crown Archetype - English 9780307587879 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Former secretary of state Rice only briefly treats her tenure during the second Bush administration in favor of a straightforward, reverential chronicle of her upbringing under two teachers in the segregated Deep South. Rice acknowledges upfront the complicated, intertwined history of blacks and whites in America, which lent a lightening of skin to her forebears that was looked upon favorably at the time. Her father, John Wesley Rice Jr., came from a family of well-educated itinerant preachers in Louisiana, while the family of her mother, Angelena Ray, were Birmingham, Ala., landowners; both were teachers at Fairfield Industrial High School and determined to live 'full and productive lives' in Birmingham, despite the blight of segregation (e.g., poll tests in the largely Democratic South resolved John Rice to become a lifelong Republican). Cocooned in an educational and musical environment, Rice was a high-achieving only child. Yet the encroaching racial tension broke open in Birmingham in the form of store boycotts, bombings, and demonstrations. Eventually, the family moved to Denver, where Rice attended the university, majoring first in piano then political science, due to the influence of professor and former Czech diplomat Josef Korbel. Rice moves fleetingly through her subsequent education at Notre Dame and Stanford. Swept into Washington Republican politics by Colin Powell and others, she sketches the 'wild ride' accompanying the Soviet Union's demise, but overall records a thrilling, inspiring life of achievement. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , One of America's most admired and decorated singers tells her inspiring life story, from theand#160;segregated south to the world's greatest stages.and#160;
"Synopsis" by ,
Jessye Norman is not only one of the worldand#8217;s most admired and beloved opera starsand#8212;she is an American icon whose life story is as moving and inspiring as the fictional plot triumphs she sang onstage.

Born and raised in Augusta, Georgia, a descendant of many generations of hardworking slave and free ancestors, she grew up amid the challenges of Jim Crow racism with the civil rights movement just beginning to awaken. Nurtured by a close family and tight-knit community centered on the local church, Jessye sang songs and spirituals constantly, never dreaming that it might lead to a career.and#160;Only when she watched a documentary about the legendary Marian Anderson did she first realize that singing could be a profession. Decades later, after a meteoric rise at the Berlin Opera, a long-delayed debut at the Metropolitan Opera, and forays into spirituals, blues, jazz, and other roots music, she has become one of Americaand#8217;s cultural treasures.and#160;Standand#160;Up Straight and Sing!and#160;is an inspiring womanand#8217;s account of an astonishing life.

"Synopsis" by ,  

 

Condoleezza Rice is a person of broad and deep accomplishment.  At various times she has excelled as an expert diplomat, brilliant political scientist, and trained concert pianist.  Her achievements run the gamut from helping to oversee the collapse of the Soviet Union, to working to protect the country in the aftermath of 9-11, to becoming only the second woman - and the first black woman ever — to serve as Secretary of State.

 

But until she was 25 she never learned to swim.

 

Not because she wouldn't have loved to, but because when she was a little girl in Birmingham, Alabama, Public Safety Commissioner Bull Connor decided he'd rather shut down the city's pools than give black citizens access.

 

Throughout the 1950's, Birmingham's black middle class largely succeeded in insulating their children from the more corrosive effects of racism, providing multiple support systems to ensure the next generation would live better than the last.  But by 1963, when Rice was applying herself to her third grader's lessons, the situation had grown intolerable.  Birmingham was an environment where blacks were expected to keep their head down and do what they were told — or face violent consequences...where even the hint of protest could prompt police beatings and blasts from a fire hose... where racially motivated bombings were so common the media dubbed the city "Bombingham."

 

So how was Rice able to achieve what she ultimately did?

 

This is the story of Condoleezza Rice that has never been told, not that of an ultra-accomplished world leader, but of a little girl trying to find her place in a hostile world and of two remarkable parents – and an extended family and community – that made all the difference. On the shoulders of individuals both black and white, young Condoleezza Rice stood and looked out on a world where anything was possible — and in a way that is singularly fascinating, Extraordinary, Ordinary People takes us not just through Rice’s childhood but, also, her twenties and thirties as she builds a record of achievement that positions her for involvement in world-historical events.

 

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