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Grant Wood: A Life

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Grant Wood: A Life Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

He claimed to be “the plainest kind of fellow you can find. There isn’t a single thing I’ve done, or experienced,” said Grant Wood, “that’s been even the least bit exciting.”

Wood was one of America’s most famous regionalist painters; to love his work was the equivalent of loving America itself. In his time, he was an “almost mythical figure,” recognized most supremely for his hard-boiled farm scene, American Gothic, a painting that has come to reflect the essence of America’s traditional values—a simple, decent, homespun tribute to our lost agrarian age.

In this major new biography of America’s most acclaimed, and misunderstood, regionalist painter, Grant Wood is revealed to have been anything but plain, or simple . . .

R. Tripp Evans reveals the true complexity of the man and the image Wood so carefully constructed of himself. Grant Wood called himself a farmer-painter but farming held little interest for him. He appeared to be a self-taught painter with his scenes of farmlands, farm workers, and folklore but he was classically trained, a sophisticated artist who had studied the Old Masters and Flemish art as well as impressionism. He lived a bohemian life and painted in Paris and Munich in the 1920s, fleeing what H. L. Mencken referred to as “the booboisie” of small-town America.

We see Wood as an artist haunted and inspired by the images of childhood; by the complex relationship with his father (stern, pious, the “manliest of men”); with his sister and his beloved mother (Wood shared his studio and sleeping quarters with his mother until her death at seventy-seven; he was forty-four).

We see Wood’s homosexuality and how his studied masculinity was a ruse that shaped his work.

Here is Wood’s life and work explored more deeply and insightfully than ever before. Drawing on letters, the artist’s unfinished autobiography, his sister’s writings, and many never-before-seen documents, Evans’s book is a dimensional portrait of a deeply complicated artist who became a “National Symbol.” It is as well a portrait of the American art scene at a time when America’s Calvinistic spirit and provincialism saw Europe as decadent and artists were divided between red-blooded patriotic men and “hothouse aesthetes.”

Thomas Hart Benton said of Grant Wood: “When this new America looks back for landmarks to help gauge its forward footsteps, it will find a monument standing up in the midst of the wreckage . . . This monument will be made out of Grant Wood’s works.”

Synopsis:

R. Tripp Evans is Professor of Art History at Wheaton College in Massachusetts. He is the

Synopsis:

Grant Wood called himself “a farmer-painter; the plainest kind of fellow you can find. There isn’t a single thing I’ve done or experienced,” Wood said, “that’s been even the least bit exciting.”

Wood was celebrated for having the common touch, perceived to be a simple man whose simplicity was not an artifice, but the very essence of his character.

In this major new biography of America’s most acclaimed—and misunderstood—regionalist painter, Grant Wood is revealed as anything but plain, or simple . . .

R. Tripp Evans makes clear that Wood’s 1930 American Gothic and scenes of farmlands, farm workers, and folklore stand in direct contrast to the dark, complex painter he was. We see that although Wood claimed to have been a self-taught painter, he was a sophisticated artist, trained in Paris and Munich in the 1920s. He was known for his heartland traditionalism and piety, but was in fact deeply ambivalent about religion. He maintained lifelong deeply idiosyncratic relations with family and spent most of his life hiding his homosexuality.

Drawing on letters, the artist’s unfinished autobiography, and his sister’s writings, as well as a cache of materials that were in his ex-wife’s possession, Evans brilliantly illuminates both the artist and the man.

About the Author

R. Tripp Evans is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts. He received his doctoral degree in the history of art from Yale University, and has served as a visiting lecturer at Yale, Wellesley College, and Brown University. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

Table of Contents

Introduction — Paint like a man — American, Gothic — Wood into stone — A fabled life — Epilogue.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307594334
Subtitle:
A Life
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf
Author:
R. Tripp Evans
Author:
Evans, R. Tripp
Subject:
Art : History - Modern (Late 19th Century to 1945)
Subject:
Art : Techniques - Painting
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Artists, Architects, Photographe
Subject:
History - Modern (Late 19th Century to 1945)
Subject:
Techniques - Painting
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Art - Artists
Subject:
Art - General
Subject:
Biography-Artists Architects and Photographers
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20101005
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
402

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Artists
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Painting » General
Biography » Artists, Architects, and Photographers
Biography » General

Grant Wood: A Life
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Product details 402 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307594334 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , R. Tripp Evans is Professor of Art History at Wheaton College in Massachusetts. He is the
"Synopsis" by , Grant Wood called himself “a farmer-painter; the plainest kind of fellow you can find. There isn’t a single thing I’ve done or experienced,” Wood said, “that’s been even the least bit exciting.”

Wood was celebrated for having the common touch, perceived to be a simple man whose simplicity was not an artifice, but the very essence of his character.

In this major new biography of America’s most acclaimed—and misunderstood—regionalist painter, Grant Wood is revealed as anything but plain, or simple . . .

R. Tripp Evans makes clear that Wood’s 1930 American Gothic and scenes of farmlands, farm workers, and folklore stand in direct contrast to the dark, complex painter he was. We see that although Wood claimed to have been a self-taught painter, he was a sophisticated artist, trained in Paris and Munich in the 1920s. He was known for his heartland traditionalism and piety, but was in fact deeply ambivalent about religion. He maintained lifelong deeply idiosyncratic relations with family and spent most of his life hiding his homosexuality.

Drawing on letters, the artist’s unfinished autobiography, and his sister’s writings, as well as a cache of materials that were in his ex-wife’s possession, Evans brilliantly illuminates both the artist and the man.

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