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Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World

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Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower, consecutive presidents of the United States, were midwesterners alike in many ways—except that they also sharply differed.  Born within six years of each other (Truman in 1884, Eisenhower in 1890), they came from small towns in the Missouri–Mississippi River Valley—in the midst of cows and wheat, pigs and corn, and grain elevators. Both were grandsons of farmers and sons of forceful mothers, and of fathers who knew failure; both were lower middle class, received public school educations, and were brought up in low-church Protestant denominations.

William Lee Miller interweaves Truman’s and Eisenhower’s life stories, which then also becomes the story of their nation as it rose to great power. They had contrasting experiences in the Great War—Truman, the haberdasher to be, led men in battle; Eisenhower, the supreme commander to be did not. Between the wars, Truman was the quintessential politician, and Eisenhower the thoroughgoing anti-politician. Truman knew both the successes and woes of the public life, while Eisenhower was sequestered in the peacetime army. Then in the wartime 1940s, these two men were abruptly lifted above dozens of others to become leaders of the great national efforts.

Miller describes the hostile maneuvering and bickering at the moment in 1952–1953 when power was to be handed from one to the other and somebody had to decide which hat to wear and who greeted whom. As president, each coped with McCarthyism, the tormenting problems of race, and the great issues of the emerging Cold War. They brought the United States into a new pattern of world responsibility while being the first Americans to hold in their hands the awesome power of weapons capable of destroying civilization.

Reading their story is a reminder of the modern American story, of ordinary men dealing with extraordinary power.

Synopsis:

From the highly regarded biographer of Abraham Lincoln, a riveting dual examination of Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower, exploring the two men's remarkable similarities and equally striking differences in the context of mid-twentieth-century American culture and politics.

 

William Lee Miller makes clear that the similarities between these two statesmen were emblematic of their Midwestern upbringings and their generation, but that within the framework of similarity, they differed markedly in their shaping experiences and choices, and in the roles they played in the high politics of the time. Miller examines their contrasting experiences during World War I and between the world wars. He shows us Truman, the quintessential politician, and Eisenhower, the thoroughgoing anti-politician, in explicit and implicit collaboration during the war-torn 1940s; their dual, but different, roles in bringing the war to an end and shaping the postwar world; their growing disapproval of each other; and, finally, in 1952, the passing of presidential power from one to the other.

About the Author

WILLIAM LEE MILLER, Scholar in Ethics and Institutions at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, has taught at Yale, Smith College, and Indiana University. His previous books include Arguing About Slavery, Lincoln's Virtues, and President Lincoln: The Duty of a Statesman.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307595645
Author:
Miller, William Lee
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
Biography-Presidents and Heads of State
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Publication Date:
20120431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9.5 x 6.5 x 1.56 in 1.54 lb

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Related Subjects

Biography » Presidents and Heads of State
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1920 to 1960
History and Social Science » US History » 1945 to Present
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World Used Hardcover
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Product details 416 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307595645 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , From the highly regarded biographer of Abraham Lincoln, a riveting dual examination of Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower, exploring the two men's remarkable similarities and equally striking differences in the context of mid-twentieth-century American culture and politics.

 

William Lee Miller makes clear that the similarities between these two statesmen were emblematic of their Midwestern upbringings and their generation, but that within the framework of similarity, they differed markedly in their shaping experiences and choices, and in the roles they played in the high politics of the time. Miller examines their contrasting experiences during World War I and between the world wars. He shows us Truman, the quintessential politician, and Eisenhower, the thoroughgoing anti-politician, in explicit and implicit collaboration during the war-torn 1940s; their dual, but different, roles in bringing the war to an end and shaping the postwar world; their growing disapproval of each other; and, finally, in 1952, the passing of presidential power from one to the other.

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