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Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Trappers, Hunters, Forages, Slaughterers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, C

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Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Trappers, Hunters, Forages, Slaughterers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, C Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

New York is not a city for growing and manufacturing food. It’s a money and real estate city, with less naked earth and industry than high-rise glass and concrete.   Yet in this intimate, visceral, and beautifully written book, Robin Shulman introduces the people of New York City  - both past and present - who  do grow vegetables, butcher meat, fish local waters, cut and refine sugar, keep bees for honey, brew beer, and make wine. In the most heavily built urban environment in the country, she shows an organic city full of intrepid and eccentric people who want to make things grow.  What’s more, Shulman artfully places today’s urban food production in the context of hundreds of years of history, and traces how we got to where we are.

 

 In these pages meet Willie Morgan, a Harlem man who first grew his own vegetables in a vacant lot as a front for his gambling racket. And David Selig, a beekeeper in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn who found his bees making a mysteriously red honey. Get to know Yolene Joseph, who fishes crabs out of the waters off Coney Island to make curried stews for her family. Meet the creators of the sickly sweet Manischewitz wine, whose brand grew out of Prohibition; and Jacob Ruppert, who owned a beer empire on the Upper East Side, as well as the New York Yankees.

 

Eat the City is about how the ability of cities to feed people has changed over time. Yet it is also, in a sense, the story of the things we long for in cities today: closer human connections, a tangible link to more basic processes, a way to shape more rounded lives, a sense of something pure.

 

Of course, hundreds of years ago, most food and drink consumed by New Yorkers was grown and produced within what are now the five boroughs. Yet people rarely realize that long after New York became a dense urban agglomeration, innovators, traditionalists, migrants and immigrants continued to insist on producing their own food. This book shows the perils and benefits—and the ironies and humor—when city people involve themselves in making what they eat.

  

Food, of course, is about hunger. We eat what we miss and what we want to become, the foods of our childhoods and the symbols of the lives we hope to lead. With wit and insight, Eat the City shows how in places like New York, people have always found ways to use their collective hunger to build their own kind of city.

 

ROBIN SHULMAN is a writer and reporter whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Slate, the Guardian, and many other publications.  She lives in New York City.

Review:

"A New York journalist takes a fondly nostalgic, immensely useful look at half a dozen key food commodities that used to be vital to the economic makeup of New York City and are making a comeback: the subtitle says it all, A Tale of the Fishers, Foragers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, Cane Cutters, Beekeepers, Winemakers, and Brewers Who Built New York. Not so long ago some combination of the city's bustling five boroughs produced the largest markets for the country's vegetables, processed meats, sugar, beer, fish, and wine (kosher), yet space constrictions and gentrification gradually eclipsed most of them, until a certain recent strain of committed urban farmer found ways to bring them back. Shulman surveys each of these markets in turn, starting with honey, whose hives were outlawed in 1999, allowed again since 2010, thanks to the city's active beekeeper's association and dozens of vibrant species of bees that supplement their nectar diet with spilled Cokes and Red Dye No. 40 from the nearby Brooklyn maraschino cherry factory. In Harlem she tracked an 'agronomist-about-town' who has grown all kinds of vegetables in stray plots over 40 years; in Queens, she visited immigrant-run slaughterhouses that let the customers choose the animals first, the Old World way; and in Brooklyn she uncovered the story of sugar as once the city's most important industry. Shulman was heartened to find four breweries struggling to operate (where there used to be 125), and she noted how all over the city, people continue stubbornly to fish. Shulman's playful mélange of history and journalism celebrates the city's return as a neighborhood food festival. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Cindy Lobeland#8217;s Urban Appetities explores the coevolution of New York City, its politics, and its foodways. Between 1800 and 1890, New York grew from a seaport town with 60,000 residentsand#151;whose food came from local farms, waters, and forestsand#151;into a city of 6,000,000, served by an elaborate army of food-sector workers, including regional dairymen and truck farmers, western ranchers, and farmers in the South, the Caribbean, and the Mediterranean. New York became abundant with food and restaurants as never before. Yet its food system was also highly inequitable and notably corrupt. Lobeland#8217;s focus on the rise of New York as both a metropolis and a food capital opens a unique window onto the intersection of the cultural, social, political, and economic transformations of the nineteenth century. Her perspective provides for fresh consideration of the development of the market economy in New York; the rise of concerns about food quality and access to food; the development of a culture of conspicuous consumption; and the transformation of domestic culinary life. Altogether, Lobel illuminates the ways in which the cityand#8217;s physical and social growth was intimately connected to changes in its food networks.

Synopsis:

Glossy magazines write about them, celebrities give their names to them, and youand#8217;d better believe thereand#8217;s an app (or ten) committed to finding you the right one. They are New York City restaurants and food shops. And their journey to international notoriety is a captivating one. The now-booming food capital was once a small seaport city, home to a mere six municipal food markets that were stocked by farmers, fishermen, and hunters who lived in the area. By 1890, however, the cityand#8217;s population had grown to more than one million, and residents could dine in thousands of restaurants with a greater abundance and variety of options than any other place in the United States.

Historians, sociologists, and foodies alike will devour the story of the origins of New York Cityand#8217;s food industry inand#160;Urban Appetites. Cindy R. Lobel focuses on the rise of New York as both a metropolis and a food capital, opening a new window onto the intersection of the cultural, social, political, and economic transformations of the nineteenth century. She offers wonderfully detailed accounts of public markets and private food shops; basement restaurants and immigrant diners serving favorites from the old country; cake and coffee shops; and high-end, French-inspired eating houses made for being seen in society as much as for dining.and#160; But as the food and the population became increasingly cosmopolitan, corruption, contamination, and undeniably inequitable conditions escalated.and#160;Urban Appetitesand#160;serves up a complete picture of the evolution of the city, its politics, and its foodways.

About the Author

ROBIN SHULMAN is a writer and reporter whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Slate, the Guardian, and many other publications.  She lives in New York City.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
and#160;
ONE / andldquo;Convenient to the New York Marketandrdquo;: Feeding New York City in the Early National Period, 1786andndash;1830
and#160;
TWO / andldquo;The Glory of a Plenteous Landandrdquo;: The Transformation of New Yorkandrsquo;s Food Supply, 1825andndash;1865
and#160;
THREE / andldquo;Monuments of Municipal Malfeasanceandrdquo;: The Flip Side of Dietary Abundance, 1825andndash;1865
and#160;
FOUR / andldquo;To See and Be Seenandrdquo;: Restaurants and Public Culture, 1825andndash;1865
and#160;
FIVE / andldquo;No Place More Attractive than Homeandrdquo;: Domesticity and Consumerism, 1830andndash;1880

SIX / andldquo;The Empire of Gastronomyandrdquo;: New York and the World, 1850andndash;1890

and#160;
Conclusion: From the Broadway Shambles to New Amsterdam Market
Notes
Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307719058
Author:
Shulman, Robin
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group (NY)
Author:
Lobel, Cindy R.
Subject:
History
Subject:
Cooking and Food-General
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Historical Food and Cooking
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
new york city;history;new york
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Publication Date:
20120731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
31 halftones, 5 maps
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » General
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » United States » New England
Cooking and Food » Sustainable Cooking
Featured Titles » Cooking and Gardening
Featured Titles » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » Food
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Sustainability
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Sustainable Living

Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Trappers, Hunters, Forages, Slaughterers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, C Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Crown Publishing Group (NY) - English 9780307719058 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A New York journalist takes a fondly nostalgic, immensely useful look at half a dozen key food commodities that used to be vital to the economic makeup of New York City and are making a comeback: the subtitle says it all, A Tale of the Fishers, Foragers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, Cane Cutters, Beekeepers, Winemakers, and Brewers Who Built New York. Not so long ago some combination of the city's bustling five boroughs produced the largest markets for the country's vegetables, processed meats, sugar, beer, fish, and wine (kosher), yet space constrictions and gentrification gradually eclipsed most of them, until a certain recent strain of committed urban farmer found ways to bring them back. Shulman surveys each of these markets in turn, starting with honey, whose hives were outlawed in 1999, allowed again since 2010, thanks to the city's active beekeeper's association and dozens of vibrant species of bees that supplement their nectar diet with spilled Cokes and Red Dye No. 40 from the nearby Brooklyn maraschino cherry factory. In Harlem she tracked an 'agronomist-about-town' who has grown all kinds of vegetables in stray plots over 40 years; in Queens, she visited immigrant-run slaughterhouses that let the customers choose the animals first, the Old World way; and in Brooklyn she uncovered the story of sugar as once the city's most important industry. Shulman was heartened to find four breweries struggling to operate (where there used to be 125), and she noted how all over the city, people continue stubbornly to fish. Shulman's playful mélange of history and journalism celebrates the city's return as a neighborhood food festival. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Cindy Lobeland#8217;s Urban Appetities explores the coevolution of New York City, its politics, and its foodways. Between 1800 and 1890, New York grew from a seaport town with 60,000 residentsand#151;whose food came from local farms, waters, and forestsand#151;into a city of 6,000,000, served by an elaborate army of food-sector workers, including regional dairymen and truck farmers, western ranchers, and farmers in the South, the Caribbean, and the Mediterranean. New York became abundant with food and restaurants as never before. Yet its food system was also highly inequitable and notably corrupt. Lobeland#8217;s focus on the rise of New York as both a metropolis and a food capital opens a unique window onto the intersection of the cultural, social, political, and economic transformations of the nineteenth century. Her perspective provides for fresh consideration of the development of the market economy in New York; the rise of concerns about food quality and access to food; the development of a culture of conspicuous consumption; and the transformation of domestic culinary life. Altogether, Lobel illuminates the ways in which the cityand#8217;s physical and social growth was intimately connected to changes in its food networks.

"Synopsis" by ,
Glossy magazines write about them, celebrities give their names to them, and youand#8217;d better believe thereand#8217;s an app (or ten) committed to finding you the right one. They are New York City restaurants and food shops. And their journey to international notoriety is a captivating one. The now-booming food capital was once a small seaport city, home to a mere six municipal food markets that were stocked by farmers, fishermen, and hunters who lived in the area. By 1890, however, the cityand#8217;s population had grown to more than one million, and residents could dine in thousands of restaurants with a greater abundance and variety of options than any other place in the United States.

Historians, sociologists, and foodies alike will devour the story of the origins of New York Cityand#8217;s food industry inand#160;Urban Appetites. Cindy R. Lobel focuses on the rise of New York as both a metropolis and a food capital, opening a new window onto the intersection of the cultural, social, political, and economic transformations of the nineteenth century. She offers wonderfully detailed accounts of public markets and private food shops; basement restaurants and immigrant diners serving favorites from the old country; cake and coffee shops; and high-end, French-inspired eating houses made for being seen in society as much as for dining.and#160; But as the food and the population became increasingly cosmopolitan, corruption, contamination, and undeniably inequitable conditions escalated.and#160;Urban Appetitesand#160;serves up a complete picture of the evolution of the city, its politics, and its foodways.

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