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Parallel Play

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Parallel Play Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Shes still not quite sure how it happened. The biological part is fairly straightforward. Its the wife-and-mother part that Eve cant wrap her head around. Much to her surprise, Eve finds herself living in Brooklyn, married to a doctor named Harvey, and toting a young infant named Ann. How did she get here? And where is that maternal instinct that was supposed to have kicked in by now?

From winter afternoons spent freezing at the Tot Spot to playgroups where she inadvertently tells the other mothers that Ann was an accident, Eve struggles to embrace motherhood and the yuppie accoutrements of her new life. It doesnt help that her even-keeled husband spends long days working at the hospital, or that her own childhood in a religious cult was-by most peoples estimates-extremely odd. And when her ex-boyfriend (her gorgeous, toned, aloof ex-boyfriend) Mark reappears, Eve is thrown for a loop. Torn between the free-spirited Manhattanite she once was and the Snugli-wearing, baby-hoisting, stay-at-home body she now finds herself inhabiting, Eve realizes she must choose between the past and the present, lust and love, childhood and adulthood.

“Whats sly, fine and real here is the way Rayfiel finally insinuates Baby into Eves slow-melting heart to form a bio-bond that becomes wondrously tight. Smart, dark, daring fare.”

-Kirkus Reviews

“Its high time we got a novel such as Parallel Play-one that portrays a young mother as neither the Virgin Mary nor as Mommie Dearest. Eve is fumbling, flawed, funny, and——above all-utterly human. Tom Rayfiel has dared to tell it like it is in this triumphant novel.”

-Binnie Kirshenbaum, author of An Almost Perfect Moment 

“Wonderfully dreamlike and sharply, hilariously satirical . . . a truly remarkable and original creation.”

-Dan Chaon, author of You Remind Me of Me

“If Thomas Pynchon had suffered postpartum depression, he might have written a novel like Parallel Play. As Eve wanders through the first months of motherhood, her observations are hilarious, eerie, and unforgettable. This is a must-read for lovers of smart fiction and flummoxed mothers.”-Amanda Eyre Ward, author of How to Be Lost

Review:

"Continuing the story of Eve (Colony Girl; Eve in the City), Rayfiel's fourth novel is a dark, hit-and-miss snapshot of young motherhood. Eve, now 27, is overwhelmed: her unexpected pregnancy resulted in marriage to older doctor Harvey Gabriel and ambivalence about caring for Ann, her seven-month-old daughter. Eve is a far cry from the supermoms she encounters at the park ('Ow! You little bitch!' she snaps when Ann bites her breast), and her relationship with Harvey has cooled. The reappearance of her ex-boyfriend Mark (a contractor who is her age exactly, and who is now married to a dancer named Iolanthe) forces her to confront her feelings and her past. Rayfiel has Eve's voice down: her turmoil and what may be postpartum depression come through loud and clear, and her rehashing of her childhood at a religious colony rings true. A side plot that has Eve's closest friend, Marjorie, fleeing town with kids in tow during a nasty divorce is less convincing, but the ending has a nice (if small) twist, and Eve remains a complex character with conflicting feelings whose voice sustains the novel." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"'Parallel Play' is the third of a trilogy of novels about Eve, who has no last name because she was brought up in a strict Midwestern religious colony that lived by Old Testament rules and didn't use last names. Eve escaped the colony and came to New York, intending to make her fortune, find her destiny. This novel finds her newly married, exiled to boring Brooklyn and saddled with a 7-month-old baby.... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345455192
Author:
Rayfiel, Thomas
Publisher:
Random House Trade
Subject:
General
Subject:
Motherhood
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.00x5.24x.60 in. .44 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Parallel Play Used Trade Paper
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$5.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Random House Trade - English 9780345455192 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Continuing the story of Eve (Colony Girl; Eve in the City), Rayfiel's fourth novel is a dark, hit-and-miss snapshot of young motherhood. Eve, now 27, is overwhelmed: her unexpected pregnancy resulted in marriage to older doctor Harvey Gabriel and ambivalence about caring for Ann, her seven-month-old daughter. Eve is a far cry from the supermoms she encounters at the park ('Ow! You little bitch!' she snaps when Ann bites her breast), and her relationship with Harvey has cooled. The reappearance of her ex-boyfriend Mark (a contractor who is her age exactly, and who is now married to a dancer named Iolanthe) forces her to confront her feelings and her past. Rayfiel has Eve's voice down: her turmoil and what may be postpartum depression come through loud and clear, and her rehashing of her childhood at a religious colony rings true. A side plot that has Eve's closest friend, Marjorie, fleeing town with kids in tow during a nasty divorce is less convincing, but the ending has a nice (if small) twist, and Eve remains a complex character with conflicting feelings whose voice sustains the novel." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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