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Stan Musial: An American Life

by

Stan Musial: An American Life Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

and#160;and#160;

The definitive biography of one of baseballandrsquo;s most celebrated, mercurial, and misunderstood figuresand#160;

and#160;and#160;and#160;

Billy Martin is a story of contrasts. He was the clutch second baseman for the dominant New York Yankees of the 1950s. He then spent sixteen seasons managing in the big leagues, and is considered by anyone who knows baseball to have been a true baseball genius, a field manager without peer. Yet heandrsquo;s remembered more for his habit of kicking dirt on umpires, for being hired and fired by George Steinbrenner five times, and for his rabble rousing and public brawls. He was combative, fiery, intimidating, and controversial, yet beloved by the everyday fan. He was hard on his players and even harder on himself. He knew how to turn around a losing team like no one elseandmdash;and how to entertain us every step of the way.

and#160;

Now, with his definitive biography Billy Martin, Pennington finally erases the caricature of Martin. Drawing on exhaustive interviews with friends, family, teammates, and countless adversaries, Pennington paints an indelible portrait of a man who never backed down for the game he loved. From his shantytown upbringing in a broken home; to his days playing for the Yankees when he almost always helped his team find a way to win; through sixteen years of managing, including his tenure in New York in the crosshairs of Steinbrenner and Reggie Jackson, Billy Martin made sure no one ever ignored him. And indeed no one could. He was the hero, the antihero, and the alter egoandmdash;or some combination of all threeandmdash;for his short sixty-one years among us.

and#160;and#160;

Review:

"Great bat, no personality is the conclusion in this genial biography of the St. Louis Cardinals slugger. New York Times sports columnist Vecsey (Baseball: A History of America's Favorite Game) insists that the Hall of Famer's 475 homers and .331 lifetime batting average put him in the company of hallowed contemporaries Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams. Alas, where the aloof Yankee Clipper and the cantankerous Splendid Splinter shared a prickly charisma, Stan the Man — even a stolid nickname — was 'the boring one.' Vecsey chronicles Musial's enormously successful if oddly uneventful career, his nonracist (though not outspokenly so) behavior as baseball was desegregating, his kind and self-effacing manner, his happy marriage, his cordial relations with umpires, even his lawn-mowing. A coiled, crouching, butt-waggling batting stance is his only eccentricity. A sportswriter to the bone, Vecsey clothes his subject's colorlessness in stirring metaphor and world-historical allusion: if DiMaggio and Williams were 'the stormy Himalayas,' Musial was 'the weathered Appalachians,' he rhapsodizes, and caps his account of the Cards' 1946 World Series victory with the news that 'less than two hours later, ten Nazi leaders were hanged.' Unfortunately, no amount of manful writing and extraneous anecdote can redeem the basic dullness of Musial's story. Photos. (May 10)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

From an award-winning New York Times sports columnist, the definitive biography of one of baseball's most celebrated, mercurial, and misunderstood figuresand#8212;legendary manager and baseball genius, Billy Martin

Synopsis:

“Although Stan Musial is universally regarded as one of baseball's greatest players, he is nevertheless underrated. He played far from the national media spotlight, in America's best baseball city, St. Louis. (One reason it is the best: Musial played there.) And his amazing consistency--he got 1,815 hits on the road and 1,815 at home—made him unspectacularly spectacular.  Happily, and at long last, George Vecsey has taken Musial's measure in this delightful biography of a man and a baseball era.”

—George Will

“A fascinating and profound look at the most underrated great player of all time, and one of the true gentlemen of the game, Stan Musial. No one researches a book like George Vecsey. I learned something on every page.”

—Tim Kurkjian, Senior Writer for ESPN the Magazine and analyst for ESPN’s Baseball Tonight and SportsCenter

About the Author

George Vecsey, a sports columnist for The New York Times, has written about such events as the FIFA World Cup and the Olympics but considers baseball, the sport he’s covered since 1960, his favorite game. He is the author of more than a dozen books, including Baseball: A History of America’s Favorite Game and Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner’s Daughter (with Loretta Lynn), which was made into an Academy Award–winning film. He has also served as a national and religion reporter for The New York Times, interviewing the Dalai Lama, Tony Blair, Billy Graham, and a host of other noteworthy figures. He lives in New York with his wife, Marianne, an artist.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345517067
Subtitle:
Baseball's Flawed Genius
Author:
Vecsey, George
Author:
Vecsey, George
Author:
Waxman, Scott
Author:
Pennington, Bill
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Subject:
General Sports & Recreation
Subject:
Baseball - History
Subject:
Biography-Sports
Subject:
Sports
Subject:
baseball;biography;sports;history;non-fiction
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20150407
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-pp b/w insert
Pages:
544
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

Biography » Sports
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Baseball » Biographies
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Baseball » General

Stan Musial: An American Life Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 544 pages ESPN Video - English 9780345517067 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Great bat, no personality is the conclusion in this genial biography of the St. Louis Cardinals slugger. New York Times sports columnist Vecsey (Baseball: A History of America's Favorite Game) insists that the Hall of Famer's 475 homers and .331 lifetime batting average put him in the company of hallowed contemporaries Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams. Alas, where the aloof Yankee Clipper and the cantankerous Splendid Splinter shared a prickly charisma, Stan the Man — even a stolid nickname — was 'the boring one.' Vecsey chronicles Musial's enormously successful if oddly uneventful career, his nonracist (though not outspokenly so) behavior as baseball was desegregating, his kind and self-effacing manner, his happy marriage, his cordial relations with umpires, even his lawn-mowing. A coiled, crouching, butt-waggling batting stance is his only eccentricity. A sportswriter to the bone, Vecsey clothes his subject's colorlessness in stirring metaphor and world-historical allusion: if DiMaggio and Williams were 'the stormy Himalayas,' Musial was 'the weathered Appalachians,' he rhapsodizes, and caps his account of the Cards' 1946 World Series victory with the news that 'less than two hours later, ten Nazi leaders were hanged.' Unfortunately, no amount of manful writing and extraneous anecdote can redeem the basic dullness of Musial's story. Photos. (May 10)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
From an award-winning New York Times sports columnist, the definitive biography of one of baseball's most celebrated, mercurial, and misunderstood figuresand#8212;legendary manager and baseball genius, Billy Martin
"Synopsis" by , “Although Stan Musial is universally regarded as one of baseball's greatest players, he is nevertheless underrated. He played far from the national media spotlight, in America's best baseball city, St. Louis. (One reason it is the best: Musial played there.) And his amazing consistency--he got 1,815 hits on the road and 1,815 at home—made him unspectacularly spectacular.  Happily, and at long last, George Vecsey has taken Musial's measure in this delightful biography of a man and a baseball era.”

—George Will

“A fascinating and profound look at the most underrated great player of all time, and one of the true gentlemen of the game, Stan Musial. No one researches a book like George Vecsey. I learned something on every page.”

—Tim Kurkjian, Senior Writer for ESPN the Magazine and analyst for ESPN’s Baseball Tonight and SportsCenter

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