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Other titles in the Red Rising Trilogy series:

Red Rising

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Red Rising Cover

ISBN13: 9780345539809
ISBN10: 034553980x
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Pierce Brown’s relentlessly entertaining debut channels the excitement of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.

“I live for the dream that my children will be born free,” she says. “That they will be what they like. That they will own the land their father gave them.”

“I live for you,” I say sadly.

Eo kisses my cheek. “Then you must live for more.”

Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children.

But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and lush wilds spread across the planet. Darrow — and Reds like him — are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.

Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity’s overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society’s ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies... even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.

Review:

“[A] spectacular adventure...one heart-pounding ride....Pierce Brown’s dizzyingly good debut novel evokes The Hunger Games, Lord of the Flies, and Ender’s Game....[Red Rising] has everything it needs to become meteoric.” Entertainment Weekly

Review:

“[A] top-notch debut novel...Red Rising ascends above a crowded dystopian field.” USA Today

Review:

Red Rising is a sophisticated vision....Brown will find a devoted audience.” Richmond Times-Dispatch

Review:

“A story of vengeance, warfare and the quest for power...reminiscent of The Hunger Games and Game of Thrones.” Kirkus Reviews

Review:

“Fast-paced, gripping, well-written — the sort of book you cannot put down. I am already on the lookout for the next one.” Terry Brooks, New York Time's bestselling author of The Sword of Shannara

Review:

“Pierce Brown has done an astounding job at delivering a powerful piece of literature that will definitely make a mark in the minds of readers.” The Huffington Post

Review:

“Compulsively readable and exceedingly entertaining...a must for both fans of classic sci-fi and fervent followers of new school dystopian epics.” Examiner.com

Review:

“[A] great debut....The author gathers a spread of elements together in much the same way George R. R. Martin does.” Tor.com

Review:

“Very ambitious...a natural for Hunger Games fans of all ages.” Booklist

Review:

“Ender, Katniss, and now Darrow: Pierce Brown’s empire-crushing debut is a sprawling vision.” Scott Sigler, New York Times bestselling author of Pandemic

Review:

“A Hollywood-ready story with plenty of action and thrills.” Publishers Weekly

Review:

“Reminiscent of...Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games....[Red Rising] will captivate readers and leave them wanting more.” Library Journal (starred review)

About the Author

Pierce Brown spent his childhood building forts and setting traps for cousins in the woods of six states and the deserts of two. Graduating from college in 2010, he fancied the idea of continuing his studies at Hogwarts. Unfortunately, he doesn’t have a magical bone in his body. So while trying to make it as a writer, he worked as a manager of social media at a startup tech company, toiled as a peon on the Disney lot at ABC Studios, did his time as an NBC page, and gave sleep deprivation a new meaning during his stint as an aide on a U.S. Senate campaign. Now he lives Los Angeles, where he scribbles tales of spaceships, wizards, ghouls, and most things old or bizarre.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

maryjensen72, November 11, 2014 (view all comments by maryjensen72)
I. LOVE. THIS. BOOK.

I actually read this book before it was published as an ARC, and fell in love with it. I truly enjoyed the Hunger Games trilogy (along with everyone else, I know), and it was being compared favorably with the HG books, so I requested it and was lucky enough to win a copy. This was all fairly nonchalant for me, I will admit.

And then I read it. Holy buckets. The writing is tight (in a good way), but the story flows along at a breakneck pace. The world-building in this book is second to none. I'm a pretty fast reader anyway, but I found the pages flying by and finished the last page before I knew what hit me. And then immediately went back to the first page and read it again. Not because I needed to read anything over again, or didn't grasp any part of the story. I just, flat, wasn't ready for the ride to be over.

This book is being billed as the new Hunger Games. That's why I picked it up. It's not. It's not the new anything. It's startlingly unique. This is dystopian fiction done in a way I've never seen it done before. And it's breathtaking.

I bought into the characters and loved them. Pierce Brown knows how to write an action scene. And he's funny. Here's an example:
"After a while of watching me, he stands and punches me in the face. "If you punch me back, you will be sent home, Pixie."
I kick him in the shin…I don’t get sent home."

I have heard a lot of blowback for the violence and rape in this book. Obviously, I don't condone rape and violence in real life, but when describing a dystopian society for a work of fiction, I understand it, and didn't feel that it was done for any reason other than to add to the story and our understanding of exactly what Darrow was up against. I'll put it this way: I didn't feel that it was uncalled for, but my daughter will have to be quite a bit older and maturer than she is now before I will allow her anywhere close to this book.

But when she gets old enough and mature enough to handle it, she's in for a huge treat. The wait for Golden Son could NOT be longer or more torturous.
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Cora, July 18, 2014 (view all comments by Cora)
Just the other day, I was telling my daughter that I don’t like trilogies, but they seem to find me. Red Rising found me.
A debut novel and the first book in a trilogy, Red Rising by Pierce Brown is a science fiction dystopian novel set on terraformed Mars. Dystopian novels abound and some people are getting tired of them, but I love them.
Brown’s book has been compared to Hunger Games, The Lord of the Flies, and Ender’s Game. I agree with the comparisons. As you might have guessed, the novel isn’t wildly unique��"it borrows from everywhere, including Roman mythology. However, I did enjoy the book and put aside another book I was having trouble finishing to read it. The borrowing doesn’t bother me; after all, Shakespeare borrowed extensively.
It’s also been called dazzling, which I don’t agree with. The book is violent, brutal, graphic, and needs a shot of feminist sensibility. It also reflects our world in disturbing ways while reflecting on the complexity of individuals within society.

Brief Summary:
Mars is divided into classes with color designations: Golds are the rich, powerful rulers, above everyone, and Reds are the lowest dregs in this cast system, lower than the Grays, Coppers, and Pinks.
Darrow, the sixteen-year-old protagonist, is a red “Helldiver,” living underground. He discovers Reds have been lied to and that Mars is inhabitable and has been for generations. After his wife is killed by a Gold, he joins a group of revolutionaries and is transformed, like Pygmalion/My Fair Lady, into a Gold. He infiltrates a prestigious school for the elite. His goal is to take down the unequal society and overthrow the Golds.

Review:
Okay for some honesty, I have a love/hate relationship with this book. I cannot recommend it without some caveats. Before I get to the negatives and positives. Here are some general observations:

•It starts slow, which I didn’t mind too much, but the story didn’t grab me right away.
•Once Darrow leaves the underground, things get interesting fast and the pace never slows; it becomes a hard to put down book.
•Mars’ society reflect our world so much that it’s impossible not to make comparisons. There is a complexity in the novel that makes this an interesting aspect and invites introspection. The complexity begins to breakdown the pure good vs pure evil dichotomy in Darrow’s mind and that might have dominated the novel.

Things I Like:
1.Writing: The writing is excellent. I expect good things from future books by Brown.
2.Mars: The world building and the plotting were shiny��"it’s a tightly woven, gritty story with an easy to understand world system.
3.Vendetta: There’s lots of revenge. Since I feel rather powerless to right the wrongs of the world, I like stories with revenge and a hero who plunges forward to make things right.
4.Multifaceted: Once Darrow enters into the world of the Golds, things become more complicated. He likes and understands some of his fellow students, yet knows he may have to kill them.
5.Point of View: His first person narrative is honest and pulls me into his story and makes me care about him, but there are some problems with his character (see below).
6.World: Brown creates a brutal Machiavellian world that is detailed, from the variances in life, language, education, and power. By the end of the story, you know that one language slip on Darrow’s part may be his future downfall because at least one person heard.

Don’t let the comparison to Hunger Games fool you. This is a fast paced, extraordinarily violent book, and makes Hunger Games seem like kindergarten violence.
I liked the story and was caught up in the fast, tightly pace story, but . . . I have some concerns.

Things I Didn’t Like:
1.Less Than Complex: Several reviews claim that the characterization in Red Rising is more complex and developed than the characterization in Hunger Games. I disagree. Katiness is a reluctant hero and the complexity of her character is at once subtle and nuanced. Other Hunger Games characters are well developed and multifaceted. Our hero Darrow is about revenge, with an occasional insight. He gives himself over to violence, revenge, and hatred with little subtlety and passing insights.
2.Perfect Hero: He is also maddeningly perfect. He, a Red the lowest of the low and not educated in Gold culture, has the top scores on his test and bests all the Golds; he immediately becomes a leader; he steps into his role as a Golds with few slip ups; he’s physically strong and out fights everyone; he outwits everyone; he’s the only one who protects the helpless. He’s the old fashion Dudley Do-Right turned Spartan-Rambo, a bigger than life, perfect hero, who rescues everyone. Really?
3.Supporting Roles: The other characters, with a few exceptions, are cardboard figures with little distinguishing features to set them apart. They are secondary to and play supporting roles to Darrow. Throughout the story these “future leaders” of society acquiesce to Darrow’s leadership.
4.Sexual Violence and Rape: This is the area I find most revolting. My problem is not that there is sexual violence and rape in the story, but that everyone except Darrow accepts and ignores it. I find it unbelievable that female characters and male characters would stand for this. With all the violence and fighting, other students would fight back. After all, they are Golds and see themselves as above all others and privileged. Would they allow other Golds to be raped with impunity? Even the adult proctors don’t do a damn thing and some of the students are their sons and daughters. Only our hero has the moral fiber to take action. Really?
5.Female characters: Even Mustang, who says she hates weak females who have to be rescued, willingly gives up being a leader to follow Darrow. In the beginning of the novel, his young wife sacrifices herself so he will become a hero. I found this particularly difficult to swallow��"almost a deal breaker. Although there are female proctors, none of the student leaders are female. Yet they are supposedly given an equal place among the men, yet all the females are easily overcome.
6.Violence: The violence is sometimes excessive. As an adult, I shrugged this off; however, I would recommend this book to older young adult readers. Parents should read it first to see what they are handing their teenager.

Although I have some major issues with the book, I liked it. I got caught up in the story and finished rather quickly, which probably reflects that I too am susceptible to and influenced by societal attitude that violence, sexual violence, rape, and second-class treatment of women is normal.

I think that the love/hate problems I have with this book reflect the deep seeded influence of my culture. I want things to be better in fiction. I harbor a hope that future societies will be more advanced.

When it comes to plot, quality of the writing, world building, conflict and action, I’d give Red Rising a 4; however, when it come to character development, the portrayal of women, and sexual violence, I’d give the book a 2. So my 3 star rating reflects the love/hate relationship I have with the book.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780345539809
Author:
Brown, Pierce
Publisher:
Del Rey Books
Subject:
Science / Adventure
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
The Red Rising Trilogy
Publication Date:
20140731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.17 x 5.48 x 0.85 in 0.7 lb

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Red Rising New Trade Paper
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Product details 416 pages Del Rey Books - English 9780345539809 Reviews:
"Review" by , “[A] spectacular adventure...one heart-pounding ride....Pierce Brown’s dizzyingly good debut novel evokes The Hunger Games, Lord of the Flies, and Ender’s Game....[Red Rising] has everything it needs to become meteoric.”
"Review" by , “[A] top-notch debut novel...Red Rising ascends above a crowded dystopian field.”
"Review" by , Red Rising is a sophisticated vision....Brown will find a devoted audience.”
"Review" by , “A story of vengeance, warfare and the quest for power...reminiscent of The Hunger Games and Game of Thrones.”
"Review" by , “Fast-paced, gripping, well-written — the sort of book you cannot put down. I am already on the lookout for the next one.” Terry Brooks, New York Time's bestselling author of The Sword of Shannara

"Review" by , “Pierce Brown has done an astounding job at delivering a powerful piece of literature that will definitely make a mark in the minds of readers.”
"Review" by , “Compulsively readable and exceedingly entertaining...a must for both fans of classic sci-fi and fervent followers of new school dystopian epics.”
"Review" by , “[A] great debut....The author gathers a spread of elements together in much the same way George R. R. Martin does.”
"Review" by , “Very ambitious...a natural for Hunger Games fans of all ages.”
"Review" by , “Ender, Katniss, and now Darrow: Pierce Brown’s empire-crushing debut is a sprawling vision.”
"Review" by , “A Hollywood-ready story with plenty of action and thrills.”
"Review" by , “Reminiscent of...Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games....[Red Rising] will captivate readers and leave them wanting more.”
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