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1 Burnside POET- A- Z910 [A] to 906 [Z]

Riding Westward: Poems

by

Riding Westward: Poems Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[Carl Phillips's] new book, Riding Westward, is both a culmination of issues and ideas he's been touching on for years and a more inward, dense exploration of some of these same themes. His voice carries the authoritative heft of wisdom, yet still is tinged with doubt; these are poems concerned with divinity, suffering, love, and belief....His poetry has always had confidence and grace, but in this latest volume he is reaching new heights, and these poems have the polish and poise of lasting creations, of lines that will continue to be read years from now." Jill Owens, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The singer turning this and that way,
as if watching the song itself
— the words to the song — leave him, as he
lets each go, the wind carrying most of it,
some of the words, falling, settling into
instead that larger darkness, where the smaller
darknesses that our lives were lie softly down.
from Riding Westward

What happens when the world as we've known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able — or less willing — to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own — speculative, athletic, immediate — as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a meditation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.

Review:

"The prolific, always articulate Phillips attained late-'90s acclaim for a series of books (among them Pastoral and From the Devotions) whose intricate clauses and mythic topics followed the passions and trials of physical embodiment and erotic (especially same-sex) love. In recent years, he has sought clearer, more various styles in which to take on the same concerns: never more than in this eighth collection, which proposes 'cruelty as a means of understanding... love's conditions — not clear,/ but clearer,' and wants us to admit, 'that's/ how we like it, I'll break your heart, break mine.' Short sentences mixed with long, arresting confessions mixed with hard explanations, make parts of the love poems and antilove poems as memorable as ever. Phillips's command of syntax, while changing favored forms, remains, as does his acquaintance with the knots and contradictions of desire: 'Trust me,' one poem asks, 'the way one animal trusts another.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Phillips is a master stylist; it is often impossible to predict where his sentence will turn on itself and in which direction it will push readers....This is the rare sort of 'difficult' poetry that is also quite readable. For while Phillips's ideas are complex, at his best, his images ground us." Library Journal

Synopsis:

What happens when the world as we've known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able--or less willing--to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own--speculative, athletic, immediate--as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a meditation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.

Synopsis:

The singer turning thisand that way, as if watching the song itself

--the words to the song--leave him, as he

lets each go, the wind carrying most of it,

some of the words, falling, settling into

instead that larger darkness, where the smaller

darknesses that our lives were lie softly down."

--from "Riding Westward"

What happens when the world as weve known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able--or less willing--to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own--speculative, athletic, immediate--as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a meditation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.

Carl Phillips is the author of seven previous books of poems, including The Rest of Love, a National Book Award finalist; Rock Harbor; and The Tether, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. The recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, he teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.  
What happens when the world as we've known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able—or less willing—to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own—speculative, athletic, immediate—as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a mediation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.
"The prolific, always articulate Phillips attained late-'90s acclaim for a series of books (among them Pastoral and From the Devotions) whose intricate clauses and mythic topics followed the passions and trials of physical embodiment and erotic (especially same-sex) love. In recent years, he has sought clearer, more various styles in which to take on the same concerns: never more than in this eighth collection, which proposes 'cruelty as a means of understanding . . . love's conditions—not clear,/ but clearer,' and wants us to admit, 'that's/ how we like it, I'll break your heart, break mine.' Short sentences mixed with long, arresting confessions mixed with hard explanations, make parts of the love poems and antilove poems as memorable as ever. Phillips's command of syntax, while changing favored forms, remains, as does his acquaintance with the knots and contradictions of desire: 'Trust me,' one poem asks, 'the way one animal trusts another.'"—Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Carl Phillips is the author of seven previous books of poems, including The Rest of Love, a National Book Award finalist; Rock Harbor; and The Tether, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. The recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, he teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374250034
Subtitle:
Poems
Author:
Phillips, Carl
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Subject:
General
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Single Author / American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20070515
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 x 0.18 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

Riding Westward: Poems Used Hardcover
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$9.95 In Stock
Product details 64 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374250034 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The prolific, always articulate Phillips attained late-'90s acclaim for a series of books (among them Pastoral and From the Devotions) whose intricate clauses and mythic topics followed the passions and trials of physical embodiment and erotic (especially same-sex) love. In recent years, he has sought clearer, more various styles in which to take on the same concerns: never more than in this eighth collection, which proposes 'cruelty as a means of understanding... love's conditions — not clear,/ but clearer,' and wants us to admit, 'that's/ how we like it, I'll break your heart, break mine.' Short sentences mixed with long, arresting confessions mixed with hard explanations, make parts of the love poems and antilove poems as memorable as ever. Phillips's command of syntax, while changing favored forms, remains, as does his acquaintance with the knots and contradictions of desire: 'Trust me,' one poem asks, 'the way one animal trusts another.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[Carl Phillips's] new book, Riding Westward, is both a culmination of issues and ideas he's been touching on for years and a more inward, dense exploration of some of these same themes. His voice carries the authoritative heft of wisdom, yet still is tinged with doubt; these are poems concerned with divinity, suffering, love, and belief....His poetry has always had confidence and grace, but in this latest volume he is reaching new heights, and these poems have the polish and poise of lasting creations, of lines that will continue to be read years from now." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "Phillips is a master stylist; it is often impossible to predict where his sentence will turn on itself and in which direction it will push readers....This is the rare sort of 'difficult' poetry that is also quite readable. For while Phillips's ideas are complex, at his best, his images ground us."
"Synopsis" by ,
What happens when the world as we've known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able--or less willing--to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own--speculative, athletic, immediate--as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a meditation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.
"Synopsis" by ,
The singer turning thisand that way, as if watching the song itself

--the words to the song--leave him, as he

lets each go, the wind carrying most of it,

some of the words, falling, settling into

instead that larger darkness, where the smaller

darknesses that our lives were lie softly down."

--from "Riding Westward"

What happens when the world as weve known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able--or less willing--to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own--speculative, athletic, immediate--as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a meditation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.

Carl Phillips is the author of seven previous books of poems, including The Rest of Love, a National Book Award finalist; Rock Harbor; and The Tether, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. The recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, he teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.  
What happens when the world as we've known it becomes divided, when the mind becomes less able—or less willing—to distinguish reality from what is desired? In Riding Westward, Carl Phillips wields his celebrated gifts for syntax and imagery that are unmistakably his own—speculative, athletic, immediate—as he confronts moral crisis. What is the difference, he asks, between good and evil, cruelty and instruction, risk and trust? Against the backdrop of the natural world, Phillips pitches the restlessness of what it means to be human, as he at once deepens and extends a mediation on that space where the forces of will and imagination collide with sexual and moral conduct.
"The prolific, always articulate Phillips attained late-'90s acclaim for a series of books (among them Pastoral and From the Devotions) whose intricate clauses and mythic topics followed the passions and trials of physical embodiment and erotic (especially same-sex) love. In recent years, he has sought clearer, more various styles in which to take on the same concerns: never more than in this eighth collection, which proposes 'cruelty as a means of understanding . . . love's conditions—not clear,/ but clearer,' and wants us to admit, 'that's/ how we like it, I'll break your heart, break mine.' Short sentences mixed with long, arresting confessions mixed with hard explanations, make parts of the love poems and antilove poems as memorable as ever. Phillips's command of syntax, while changing favored forms, remains, as does his acquaintance with the knots and contradictions of desire: 'Trust me,' one poem asks, 'the way one animal trusts another.'"—Publishers Weekly

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