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1 Beaverton African American Studies- Slavery and Reconstruction

This title in other editions

Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction (Vintage)

by

Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction (Vintage) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From one of our most distinguished historians, a new examination of the vitally important years of Emancipation and Reconstruction during and immediately following the Civil War — a necessary reconsideration that emphasizes the era's political and cultural meaning for today's America.

In Forever Free, Eric Foner overturns numerous assumptions growing out of the traditional understanding of the period, which is based almost exclusively on white sources and shaped by (often unconscious) racism. He presents the period as a time of determination, especially on the part of recently emancipated black Americans, to put into effect the principles of equal rights and citizenship for all.

Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, he places a new emphasis on the centrality of the black experience to an understanding of the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in helping win the Civil War, and — even more actively — in shaping Reconstruction and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. Foner makes clear how, by war's end, freed slaves in the South built on networks of church and family in order to exercise their right of suffrage as well as gain access to education, land, and employment.

He shows us that the birth of the Ku Klux Klan and renewed acts of racial violence were retaliation for the progress made by blacks soon after the war. He refutes lingering misconceptions about Reconstruction, including the attribution of its ills to corrupt African American politicians and "carpetbaggers," and connects it to the movements for civil rights and racial justice.

Joshua Brown's illustrated commentary on the era's graphic art and photographs complements the narrative. He offers a unique portrait of how Americans envisioned their world and time.

Forever Free is an essential contribution to our understanding of the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War — a persuasive reading of history that transforms our sense of the era from a time of failure and despair to a threshold of hope and achievement.

Review:

"Probably no period in American history is as controversial, as distorted by myth and as 'essentially unknown' as the era of emancipation and Reconstruction, award-winning historian Foner (The Story of American Freedom; Reconstruction; etc.) argues in this dense, rectifying but highly readable account. His analysis of 'that turbulent era, its successes and failures, and its long-term consequences up until this very day' addresses the debates among historians, corrects the misrepresentations and separates myth from fact with persuasive data. Foner opens his work with an overview of slavery and the Civil War and concludes with a consideration of the Civil Rights movement and the continuing impact of Reconstruction upon the current political scene, a framework that adds to the clarity of his history of that era, its aftermath and its legacy. Joshua Brown's six interspersed 'visual essays,' with his fresh commentary on images from slavery through Reconstruction to Jim Crow, buttress Foner's text and contribute to its accessibility. In his mission to illuminate Reconstruction's critical repercussions for contemporary American culture, Foner balances his passion for racial equality and social justice with disciplined scholarship. His book is a valuable, fluid introduction to a complex period. 139 illus. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In the first half of the 20th century, white Americans remembered the chaotic decades after the Civil War as a 'tragic era' when bestial ex-slaves ruled a prostrated white race, throwing noble white leaders out of government, stealing public funds that black legislators extracted through exorbitant taxation, and assaulting innocent white girls. After seeing D.W. Griffith's 1915 film 'The Birth of... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[A] more accessible, though equally distinguished, treatment of the material covered in Foner's Reconstruction. It draws on his earlier work and also on more recent scholarship to...correct common misconceptions about the period (1865–1877)." School Library Journal

Review:

"Forever Free will not supersede Reconstruction....His new book is aimed at readers basically unfamiliar with American history....Forever Free is a good book: passionate, lucid, concise without being light." James Goodman, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Passionate, lucid, concise without being light....Foner traces the lines of race and politics that run from Reconstruction to the age of segregation to the civil rights movement to our own time." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"African Americans emerge as political powerful actors in Forever Free. In [these] vivid pages...we become acquainted with these extraordinary people, some well-known, some virtually unknown." The New Republic

Synopsis:

Refuting lingering misconceptions about the Reconstruction period, an award-winning author explores the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War. High school and older.

Synopsis:

From one of our most distinguished historians comes a groundbreaking new examination of the myths and realities of the period after the Civil War.

Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, Eric Foner places a new emphasis on black experiences and roles during the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in shaping Reconstruction, and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. He compellingly refutes long-standing misconceptions of Reconstruction, and shows how the failures of the time sowed the seeds of the Civil Rights struggles of the 1950s and 60s. Richly illustrated and movingly written, this is an illuminating and essential addition to our understanding of this momentous era.

About the Author

Eric Foner, a winner of the Bancroft Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize, is the DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His books include The Story of American Freedom and Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War. He lives in New York City.

Joshua Brown is the executive director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His books include Beyond the Lines: Pictorial Reporting, Everyday Life, and the Crisis of Gilded Age America. He lives in New York City.

This book is the first effort of the Los Angeles-based Forever Free Project, an ongoing collaboration among film and television producers and writers and our most distinguished historians and scholars. The Forever Free Project is preparing a film on Emancipation and Reconstruction.

Table of Contents

Foreword

Seeing Race and Rights: A Note About the Visual Essays

Prologue

CHAPTER ONE: The Peculiar Institution

Visual Essay: True Likenesses

CHAPTER TWO: Forever Free

Visual Essay: Re-visions of War

CHAPTER THREE: The Meanings of Freedom

Visual Essay: Altered Relations

CHAPTER FOUR: An American Crisis

CHAPTER FIVE: The Tocsin of Freedom

Visual Essay: On the Offensive

CHAPTER SIX: The Facts of Reconstruction

Visual Essay: Countersigns

CHAPTER SEVEN: The Abandonment of Reconstruction

Visual Essay: Jim Crow

EPILOGUE: The Unfinished Revolution

Bibliography for Further Reading

Bibliography for the Visual Essays

Illustration Credits

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375702747
Author:
Foner, Eric
Publisher:
Vintage Books USA
Illustrator:
Brown, Joshua
Author:
Eric Foner Illustrations edited and with Commentary by Joshua Brown
Author:
Eric Foner Illustrations edited and with Commentary by Joshua Brown
Author:
Brown, Joshua
Subject:
United States - Civil War
Subject:
United States - Reconstruction Period (1865-1877)
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
History
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
Subject:
United States Race relations History.
Subject:
United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
Subject:
US History-1800 to Civil War
Subject:
reconstruction;history;slavery;civil war;american history;emancipation
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20061131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
151 ILLUS
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.10x5.04x.64 in. .62 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Slavery and Reconstruction
History and Social Science » Military » Civil War » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » General

Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction (Vintage) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375702747 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Probably no period in American history is as controversial, as distorted by myth and as 'essentially unknown' as the era of emancipation and Reconstruction, award-winning historian Foner (The Story of American Freedom; Reconstruction; etc.) argues in this dense, rectifying but highly readable account. His analysis of 'that turbulent era, its successes and failures, and its long-term consequences up until this very day' addresses the debates among historians, corrects the misrepresentations and separates myth from fact with persuasive data. Foner opens his work with an overview of slavery and the Civil War and concludes with a consideration of the Civil Rights movement and the continuing impact of Reconstruction upon the current political scene, a framework that adds to the clarity of his history of that era, its aftermath and its legacy. Joshua Brown's six interspersed 'visual essays,' with his fresh commentary on images from slavery through Reconstruction to Jim Crow, buttress Foner's text and contribute to its accessibility. In his mission to illuminate Reconstruction's critical repercussions for contemporary American culture, Foner balances his passion for racial equality and social justice with disciplined scholarship. His book is a valuable, fluid introduction to a complex period. 139 illus. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[A] more accessible, though equally distinguished, treatment of the material covered in Foner's Reconstruction. It draws on his earlier work and also on more recent scholarship to...correct common misconceptions about the period (1865–1877)."
"Review" by , "Forever Free will not supersede Reconstruction....His new book is aimed at readers basically unfamiliar with American history....Forever Free is a good book: passionate, lucid, concise without being light."
"Review" by , "Passionate, lucid, concise without being light....Foner traces the lines of race and politics that run from Reconstruction to the age of segregation to the civil rights movement to our own time."
"Review" by , "African Americans emerge as political powerful actors in Forever Free. In [these] vivid pages...we become acquainted with these extraordinary people, some well-known, some virtually unknown."
"Synopsis" by , Refuting lingering misconceptions about the Reconstruction period, an award-winning author explores the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War. High school and older.
"Synopsis" by , From one of our most distinguished historians comes a groundbreaking new examination of the myths and realities of the period after the Civil War.

Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, Eric Foner places a new emphasis on black experiences and roles during the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in shaping Reconstruction, and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. He compellingly refutes long-standing misconceptions of Reconstruction, and shows how the failures of the time sowed the seeds of the Civil Rights struggles of the 1950s and 60s. Richly illustrated and movingly written, this is an illuminating and essential addition to our understanding of this momentous era.

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