Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Children's Middle Readers- General

More copies of this ISBN

The Red Umbrella

by

The Red Umbrella Cover

ISBN13: 9780375861901
ISBN10: 0375861904
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $10.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Red Umbrella is the moving tale of a 14-year-old girl's journey from Cuba to America as part of Operation Pedro Pan—an organized exodus of more than 14,000 unaccompanied children, whose parents sent them away to escape Fidel Castro's revolution.

 

In 1961, two years after the Communist revolution, Lucía Álvarez still leads a carefree life, dreaming of parties and her first crush. But when the soldiers come to her sleepy Cuban town, everything begins to change. Freedoms are stripped away. Neighbors disappear. Her friends feel like strangers. And her family is being watched.

 

As the revolution's impact becomes more oppressive, Lucía's parents make the heart-wrenching decision to send her and her little brother to the United States—on their own.

 

Suddenly plunked down in Nebraska with well-meaning strangers, Lucía struggles to adapt to a new country, a new language, a new way of life. But what of her old life? Will she ever see her home or her parents again? And if she does, will she still be the same girl?

 

The Red Umbrella is a moving story of country, culture, family, and the true meaning of home.

Review:

"In this compelling, atmospheric first novel that begins in postrevolutionary Cuba, Gonzalez sketches the immigration experience of thousands of children sent to the United States through likable 14-year-old narrator Luca. Initially, politics feel removed from Luca's life ('I was growing tired of constantly hearing about the revolution, but I privately thanked Castro for postponing my algebra test'). However, Gonzales believably escalates harrowing political events and their personal cost to Luca's family, as she finds the family doctor hung from an oak tree, and her father is detained after someone betrays the family's hidden stash of money and jewelry. The situation forces Luca's parents to send Luca and her seven-year-old brother, Frankie, to America while they await visas. Debut author Gonzalez excels at highlighting the cultural difficulties of their transition, as Luca and Frankie eventually end up living with a foster family in rural — and quite foreign — Nebraska. Contemporary newspaper headlines such as the 1961 Nevada State Journal's 'Castro Adopts Brainwashing' lead each chapter and offer wider commentary. The memorable heroine and supporting cast offer a moving portrait of resilience and reinvention. Ages 10 — up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Inspired by the experience of her parents, Gonzalez tells the story of a 14-year-old girl's journey from Cuba to America as part of Operation Pedro Pan--an organized exodus of more than 14,000 unaccompanied children, whose parents sent them away to escape Fidel Castro's revolution.

About the Author

Christina Diaz Gonzalez based this powerful novel on the experiences of her parents, and of the more than 14,000 other unaccompanied minors who came to the United States through Operation Pedro Pan. This mass exodus of children is a little-known and fascinating piece of history, and Gonzalez has created a story that brings that history vibrantly to life.

 

Gonzalez practiced law for several years before returning to her childhood passion for stories and writing. The Red Umbrella is her first novel.

 

Christina Diaz Gonzalez lives in Miami, Florida, with her husband and two sons. You can visit her on the Web at www.christinagonzalez.com.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, October 5, 2010 (view all comments by Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com)
During the midst of the Cuban Revolution in the early 1960s, thousands of children were sent alone to live with relatives or be taken in by aid agencies in the U. S. The Red Umbrella by Christina Diaz Gonzalez, tells the fictional story of two of these children.

When the revolution first began, life didn’t change much in the Alvarez household. Lucia still read fashion magazines with her best friend Ivette, and Lucia’s little brother Frankie liked riding his bike and spying on soldiers. But eventually they began to notice more tension in their home as their father came under increasing pressure at work. Their parents’ friends began disappearing, and kids their age began joining a revolutionary youth corps before their parents decided that Lucia and Frankie would leave their home to live with a foster family in the U.S.

Gonzalez’s vivid prose brings Cuba of the 1960s to life with all its vibrant colors, spicy food, and tropical climate all in a backdrop of revolutionary tensions. No one knows who to trust anymore; even family members and best friends turn against each other. Each chapter starts with a headline about Cuba pulled from newspapers across the U.S. It’s a great way to compare how the revolution was viewed in this country as compared to how it was being experienced by Cubans.

Through Lucia’s eyes you fall in love with the Cuba she longs to have back again and worry for the family and friends she leaves behind. As Lucia and Frankie struggle to adjust in a country where they barely speak the language and a state where it snows in winter, they also learn the outside world’s perspective of their homeland.

Gonzalez based her story on the experiences of her parents and thousands of other children who came to the U.S. in a program known as Operation Pedro Pan. The tale she weaves in The Red Umbrella is more than great historical fiction about an event that still affects the lives of Cubans and Cuban exiles, it is also a tribute to the courage the children of exile showed in the face of immense uncertainty and upheaval. I highly recommend it for mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 9 to 14.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375861901
Author:
Gonzalez, Christina Diaz
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers
Author:
Gonzalez, Christina
Subject:
Cuba - History - 1959-1990
Subject:
Family life -- Cuba.
Subject:
People & Places - United States - Hispanic/Latino
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Ethnic - Hispanic & Latino
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Children s-General
Publication Date:
20100531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 5
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.30x5.78x1.03 in. .86 lbs.
Age Level:
10-12

Other books you might like

  1. The Elegance of the Hedgehog
    Used Trade Paper $8.95
  2. This Is Where I Leave You
    Used Hardcover $11.95

Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Middle Readers » General

The Red Umbrella Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers - English 9780375861901 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this compelling, atmospheric first novel that begins in postrevolutionary Cuba, Gonzalez sketches the immigration experience of thousands of children sent to the United States through likable 14-year-old narrator Luca. Initially, politics feel removed from Luca's life ('I was growing tired of constantly hearing about the revolution, but I privately thanked Castro for postponing my algebra test'). However, Gonzales believably escalates harrowing political events and their personal cost to Luca's family, as she finds the family doctor hung from an oak tree, and her father is detained after someone betrays the family's hidden stash of money and jewelry. The situation forces Luca's parents to send Luca and her seven-year-old brother, Frankie, to America while they await visas. Debut author Gonzalez excels at highlighting the cultural difficulties of their transition, as Luca and Frankie eventually end up living with a foster family in rural — and quite foreign — Nebraska. Contemporary newspaper headlines such as the 1961 Nevada State Journal's 'Castro Adopts Brainwashing' lead each chapter and offer wider commentary. The memorable heroine and supporting cast offer a moving portrait of resilience and reinvention. Ages 10 — up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Inspired by the experience of her parents, Gonzalez tells the story of a 14-year-old girl's journey from Cuba to America as part of Operation Pedro Pan--an organized exodus of more than 14,000 unaccompanied children, whose parents sent them away to escape Fidel Castro's revolution.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.