The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Red Glass

by

Red Glass Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One night in June, at midnight, I was in bed reading The Little Prince, a book I'd already read once and underlined for world lit class. I was lost in the story, right there with the pilot alone in the sand dunes when the little boy appears out of nowhere.

Right then, the phone rang. I walked into the kitchen in my nightgown, my bare feet slapping the clay tile, my mind still in the sand dunes of another planet.

I picked up the phone. Hello?

“Officer Douglas here, Border Patrol. I need to speak with Juan Gutiéeacute;rrez.

My stomach tightened. I knocked on Mom and Juan's door. Juan. Border Patrol’s on the phone.”

During the phone call, Juan listened and nodded gravely. Yes, yes, I see. Seven dead? His voice cracked. “I have no idea how my business card got in this kid's pocket.

I sat at the kitchen table, tracing the deep, worn scratches in the wood, trying not to stare at the tears leaking out of Juan's eyes.

Mom disappeared into the bedroom, and a few minutes later, calmly reemerged, her keys jangling. She'd already changed into a gauzy dress and turquoise necklace. She carried herself in a European-model way, her neck long, never slouching, not even in the middle of the night un- der the weight of bad news. Only two delicate furrows on her forehead betrayed her worry. That, and her British accent grew a bit more pronounced, as it did whenever she got emotional.

Just as Juan was hanging up the phone, Great-aunt Dika thudded into the kitchen, her eyes wide and alarmed. What is it? she cried. “What is it?” For Dika, being woken in the middle of the night meant bombings and attacks. She came from Bosnia and she'd materialized in our lives six months earlier. Dee-ka is how she said her name. Trying to understand Dika was like deciphering a code: vs were really ws, ds were ths, rolling rrrs were rs. Her words pierced the air, loud and shrill, as if she were perpetually in the middle of a big, rowdy party. Be patient with her, Sophie, Mom kept telling me, the woman barely survived a war. But I suspected she was a naturally hyper person.

Juan rubbed his face. The muscles in his arms flexed, moving the snake tattoos. Seven Mexicans died crossing the desert. He spoke in Spanish, as he always did when he felt deeply about something. One boy survived. They found my business card in his pocket.

On the way to the hospital in the puttering Volkswagen Bus, Mom clutched the wheel and came up with possible scenarios. Juan, meanwhile, sat hunched in the passenger seat, his head in his hands.

He'd come from Mexico in the eighties, illegally, across the desert. He got residency after he married my mom nine years ago. Since then, when people crossed the desert to Tucson, Juan sometimes put them up for a night. He gave them food and water and always refused payment. His motives were good, but what he did was against the law. Mom finally put her foot down about it. Only in absolute emergencies, she said, could these people stay at our place.

Mom sped down First Avenue, her eyes flicking nervously from the rearview to the side-view mirror. I knew she was wondering if we'd get in trouble, if the Border Patrol had discovered we'd been helping immigrants. You know, Juan, she said in Spanish, “maybe you did business with someone who knew this family.

Synopsis:

Sixteen-year-old Sophie, frail and delicate since her premature birth, discovers her true strength during a journey through Mexico, where the six-year-old orphan her family hopes to adopt was born, and to Guatemala, where her would-be boyfriend hopes to find his mother and plans to remain.

Synopsis:

One night in June, at midnight, I was in bed reading The Little Prince, a book I'd already read once and underlined for world lit class. I was lost in the story, right there with the pilot alone in the sand dunes when the little boy appears out of nowhere.

Right then, the phone rang. I walked into the kitchen in my nightgown, my bare feet slapping the clay tile, my mind still in the sand dunes of another planet.

I picked up the phone. Hello?

Officer Douglas here, Border Patrol. I need to speak with Juan Gutierrez.

My stomach tightened. I knocked on Mom and Juan's door. Juan. Border Patrol's on the phone.

During the phone call, Juan listened and nodded gravely. Yes, yes, I see. Seven dead? His voice cracked. I have no idea how my business card got in this kid's pocket.

I sat at the kitchen table, tracing the deep, worn scratches in the wood, trying

About the Author

Laura Resau lived in the Mixtec region of Oaxaca, Mexico, for two years as an English teacher and anthropologist. She now lives with her husband and her dog in Colorado.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375890598
Publisher:
Delacorte Press
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : People & Places - Mexico
Author:
Laura Resau
Author:
Laura Resau
Subject:
People & Places - Mexico
Subject:
Social Issues - Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Automobile travel
Subject:
Mexico
Subject:
Audio Books-Children s
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Emigration and Immigration
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20070911
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Grade Level:
4-7
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Age Level:
9-12

Related Subjects

Children's » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Emigration and Immigration

Red Glass
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 288 pages Random House Children's Books - English 9780375890598 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Sixteen-year-old Sophie, frail and delicate since her premature birth, discovers her true strength during a journey through Mexico, where the six-year-old orphan her family hopes to adopt was born, and to Guatemala, where her would-be boyfriend hopes to find his mother and plans to remain.
"Synopsis" by , One night in June, at midnight, I was in bed reading The Little Prince, a book I'd already read once and underlined for world lit class. I was lost in the story, right there with the pilot alone in the sand dunes when the little boy appears out of nowhere.

Right then, the phone rang. I walked into the kitchen in my nightgown, my bare feet slapping the clay tile, my mind still in the sand dunes of another planet.

I picked up the phone. Hello?

Officer Douglas here, Border Patrol. I need to speak with Juan Gutierrez.

My stomach tightened. I knocked on Mom and Juan's door. Juan. Border Patrol's on the phone.

During the phone call, Juan listened and nodded gravely. Yes, yes, I see. Seven dead? His voice cracked. I have no idea how my business card got in this kid's pocket.

I sat at the kitchen table, tracing the deep, worn scratches in the wood, trying

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.