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Yesterday

Yesterday Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

one

When I wake up I have a pounding headache behind my eyes just like I’ve had every morning lately. At first my eyelids refuse to open fully, and when they do the weak winter light wafting through my window burns my retinas. My brain feels sluggish and confused as I take in my surroundings: the white chest of drawers and matching mirror across from my bed; a collection of freshly laundered clothes folded neatly on top of the dresser, waiting for me to put them away; and a wooden desk with an open fashion magazine lying across it. Sometimes it takes me ten seconds or so to remember where I am and what’s brought me here . . . and as soon as I remember I want to forget again.

My mom says the headache’s probably a remnant from the bad flu we all caught flying back from New Zealand, but the other day I overheard her friend Nancy whisper, as the two of them peeled potatoes in the kitchen, that it could be a grief headache. The kind that strikes when you suddenly lose your father to a gas explosion and the three-­quarters of you left in the family have to move back to a place you barely remember.

Today is unlike the other days since we’ve been back because today I start school here. A Canadian high school with regular Canadian kids whose fathers didn’t die in explosions in a foreign country.

I’ve gone to school in Hong Kong, Argentina, Spain and most recently New Zealand, but Canada—­the country where I was born—­is the one that feels alien. When my grandfather hugged us each in turn at the airport, murmuring “Welcome home,” I felt as though I was in the arms of a stranger. His watery blue eyes, hawklike nose and lined forehead looked just how I remembered, yet he was different in a way I couldn’t pinpoint. And it wasn’t only him. Everything was different—­more dynamic and distinct than the images in my head. Crisp. Limitless.

The shock, probably. The shock and the grief. I’m not myself.

I squint as I kick off the bedcovers, knowing that the headache will dull once I’ve eaten something. While I’m dragging myself down to the kitchen, the voices of my mother and ten-­year-­old sister flit towards me.

“I feel hot,” Olivia complains. “Maybe I shouldn’t go today. What if I’m still contagious?”

My mother humors Olivia and stretches her palm along her forehead as I shuffle into the kitchen. “You’re not hot,” she replies, her gaze flicking over to me. “You’ll be fine. It’s probably just new-­school jitters.”

Olivia glances my way too, her spoon poised to slip back into her cereal. Her top teeth scrape over her bottom lip as she dips her spoon into her cornflakes and slowly stirs. “I’m not nervous. I just don’t want to go.”

I don’t want to go either.

I want to devour last night’s cold pizza leftovers and then lie in front of the TV watching Three’s Company, Leave It to Beaver or whatever dumb repeat I can find. All day long. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

“Morning, Freya,” my mother says.

I squeeze past her and dig into the fridge for last night’s dinner. “Morning,” I mumble to the refrigerator shelves.

“They’re behind the margarine and under the bacon,” my mother advises.

And they are. I pinch the Saran Wrap–covered slices between my fingers and let the fridge door swing shut. Then I plop myself into the seat next to Olivia’s, although she’s junked up my table space with her pencil case and assorted school stuff. I could sit in my father’s place, which is junk-­free, but nobody except Nancy or my grandfather has used his seat since he died. This isn’t even the same table that we had in New Zealand, but still Olivia, Mom and I always leave a chair for my dad.

If he were here now he’d be rushing around with a mug of coffee, looking for his car keys and throwing on his blazer. You’d think a diplomat would be more organized but my father was always in danger of being late. He was brilliant, though. One of the smartest people you’d ever meet. Everyone said so.

I shove Olivia’s school junk aside and cram cold pizza into my mouth with the speed of someone who expects to have it snatched from her hand. My mother shakes her head at me and says, “You’re going to choke on that if you don’t slow down.”

I thought sadness normally killed appetite but for me it’s been the opposite. There are three things I can’t get enough of lately: sleep, food, television.

I roll my eyes at my mother and chew noisily but with forced slowness. Today’s also a first for her—­her first day at the new administrative job Nancy fixed her up with at Sheridan College—­but my mother doesn’t seem nervous, only muted, like a washed-­out version of the person she was when my father was alive. That’s the grief too, and one of the most unsettling things about it is that it drags you into a fog that makes the past seem like something you saw in a movie and the present nearly as fictional.

I don’t feel like I belong in my own life. Not the one here with Olivia and my mom but not the old one in New Zealand either. My father’s death has hollowed me out inside.

No matter how I happen to feel about things, though, I have to go to school. After breakfast Mom drives Olivia to hers on the way to work but since mine is only a couple of blocks away and begins fifteen minutes later I have to walk.

Review:

"In Martin's fifth YA novel, the author pairs a solid romance and an SF premise with mixed results. It's 1985, and Freya and her family have recently moved to Canada. On Freya's first day at a new school, the high school sophomore wakes up feeling like her memories of her recent life in New Zealand and the death of her father are somehow artificial. She makes a few friends at school, but is entranced by a gorgeous boy, Garren, certain that she knows him. Garren doesn't remember Freya, but after she confronts him, they realize that odd coincidences tie them together; exploring these connections leads to threats that bring them closer. A gratuitous prologue undercuts any potential surprise over Freya's origins for readers, and Martin (My Beating Teenage Heart) further weakens the story with a chapter-long infodump. It's unfortunate, as there's a good deal of charm in Freya and Garren's relationship and the fleshed-out supporting cast (particularly Freya's mother and her classmates), as well as some well-written action sequences (and one intensely erotic scene) late in the book. Ages 14 — up. Agent: Stephanie Thwaites, Curtis Brown. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

US

About the Author

C. K. KELLY MARTIN is the critically acclaimed author of I Know It's Over, One Lonely Degree, and The Lighter Side of Life and Death. She lives in the Toronto area with her husband. 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375966507
Publisher:
Random House Books for Young Readers
Subject:
Children s-Adventure Stories
Author:
Martin, C. K. Kelly
Edition Description:
Library binding
Publication Date:
20120925
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 9
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
8.57 x 5.75 x 1.2 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 14

Related Subjects

Children's » Action and Adventure » Adventure Stories
Children's » General
Children's » Science Fiction and Fantasy » Science Fiction

Yesterday
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 368 pages Random House Books for Young Readers - English 9780375966507 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In Martin's fifth YA novel, the author pairs a solid romance and an SF premise with mixed results. It's 1985, and Freya and her family have recently moved to Canada. On Freya's first day at a new school, the high school sophomore wakes up feeling like her memories of her recent life in New Zealand and the death of her father are somehow artificial. She makes a few friends at school, but is entranced by a gorgeous boy, Garren, certain that she knows him. Garren doesn't remember Freya, but after she confronts him, they realize that odd coincidences tie them together; exploring these connections leads to threats that bring them closer. A gratuitous prologue undercuts any potential surprise over Freya's origins for readers, and Martin (My Beating Teenage Heart) further weakens the story with a chapter-long infodump. It's unfortunate, as there's a good deal of charm in Freya and Garren's relationship and the fleshed-out supporting cast (particularly Freya's mother and her classmates), as well as some well-written action sequences (and one intensely erotic scene) late in the book. Ages 14 — up. Agent: Stephanie Thwaites, Curtis Brown. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , US
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