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1 Hawthorne Mystery- A to Z

Cold Is the Grave: A Novel of Suspense

by

Cold Is the Grave: A Novel of Suspense Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Internationally acclaimed master of literary suspense, Peter Robinson, follows up his Anthony Award- winning "In a Dry Season with a taut and riveting tale of elusive evil and destructive rot that is harbored in the heart of a family.
How did you make the jump from poetry and literature to crime fiction? What drew you to the genre, and what keeps you there?
For years I wrote only poetry and studied literature in general. In the late seventies and early eighties, I found myself dissatisfied with the direction in which poetry was going and became more interested in its formal structures. The next thing I knew I was tending towards narrative verse, so it wasn't such a great leap to prose fiction. Crime fiction was immediately attractive because of its formal and structured nature, though I have tried to move away from some of the stricter requirements since then — and that's probably what keeps me there, the feeling that you can push at the boundaries, go further with each book. It was also interesting to me because it seemed to provide a way for a writer both to tell a good story and say something about society and human nature, and that's something else that keeps it fresh for me. The writers who first drew me to the genre were Raymond Chandler, Georges Simenon and Ross Macdonald.
Where do your ideas come from? Specifically, how did you develop Cold is the Grave?
Ideas come from all over the place, and Cold is the Grave has several sources. First, when I was writing Blood at the Root, I did a lot of research over the Internet and was amazed and appalled at the number of Neo-Nazi Web sites. The same can be said for sex sites. Not appalling, as I don't find nudityor depictions of the sex act at all appalling, the way as I do racism and holocaust denial, but there are certainly plenty of them, and they are easy to find. Many of them are amateur, and I just wondered, "What if a father saw a photo of his runaway teenage daughter naked on one of these sites?" It seemed like a good starting point. The second stage was, "Who could the father be?" In the previous few books, I had outlined a conflict between Banks and his boss, Chief Constable Riddle. Riddle was still pretty much a one-dimensional character to me — the tyrannical boss — so I knew I either had to develop him, dissect him and find out what makes him tick, or simply dump him. I chose the former, and "Cold is the Grave is as much an exploration of Riddle, his background and his family as anything else. Thirdly, I wanted some sort of organized crime that avoided the usual clichÉ s of drugs, prostitution and gambling, so when I read a series of articles in the newspapers about huge smuggling and bootlegging operations, that seemed tailor-made for my needs.
Tell us about Banks. Is there a person or persons who inspired him? How much is Alan Banks like Peter Robinson and vice versa?
If I told you, you wouldn't believe me! I made Banks up out of nowhere — I didn't know any policemen at the time — and named him after an old school friend I haven't seen for years. Certainly his fictional models would include detectives such as Maigret and Wexford, though I have tried to make Banks a bit more modern and open to new ideas. There's definitely a bit of the rebel and the Don Quixote in him — he kicks against the pricks and tilts at windmills — and perhaps some of that comes fromme. We're not really alike, though we share some tastes in music and agree on a number of political issues. We also share the same working-class background, and I think our lives followed a similar course until our late teens when I went into university and a career in literature, teaching and writing, and Banks joined the police. Since then we have diverged, but our paths cross once in a while. I can't say too much about him as I find he is constantly evolving, and I'm still discovering new things about him, which helps to keep the series fresh for me.
Your novels are very detailed, and the police procedure seems quite realistic and believable. Describe your research process.
Creating the illusion of believability is one of the chief tasks of the novelist. Outlining the actual methods one takes to achieve it doesn't really help to explain it at all. What do I do? I ask questions, read books, surf the 'net. Over the years I have got to know a few police detectives, and they are only too willing to answer my questions — it just takes them a while sometimes, if I don't get them in the pub and buy them a few pints! I don't like to get hung up on research and police procedure. It's more important for me to get under the skin of the characters and pay attention to the human stuff. Usually, it's a matter of my wanting to do a certain thing and asking if there's any way I can get away with it, make it believable. There usually is, even if it means giving Banks a temporary promotion so that he can believably head a certain investigation, as I have had to do in the book I'm working on now.
You have lived in Canada since 1974, yet you set these novels in England. Why? Do you findit difficult to write long distance?
I still knew far more about England when I started playing with the idea of the series in the late seventies. I probably still do. I think the place where you spend your formative years — go to school, play, date your first girlfriend — is the place that continues to exert the greatest influence on you in later life. I also went to university in England and went through the whole "sixties" experience there. So it's where I grew up. Of course, the place has changed a lot since then, and I have to make more of an effort to keep up. I have to watch my language, too, as I've been here long enough to say "pants" instead of "trousers," and my English readers come down on me like a ton of bricks over things like that. I usually blame the copy editor! Also, the distance gives me a unique perspective I simply wouldn't have if I lived there — a certain degree of detachment towards the social structure — and perhaps even a sense of nostalgia that imbues the landscape descriptions. Of course, I also go back frequently and eavesdrop on conversations in pubs.
What's the writing process like for you? Do you get ideas fully formed, or do they take some time to germinate? When they come, do you immediately write the entire novel, or do you take your time getting it down on paper?
I start when the pressure builds up to a certain point, but I have little idea of the plot beyond the identity of the victim and a circle of friends/enemies. Mostly, I depend on ideas coming as I write, rather than sitting back and waiting for them. It usually works, but it can be very frustrating at times! I've often wished I were the kind of writer who could sit down andproduce a detailed outline, then fill in the dots, but that doesn't work for me.
Your plots are quite complex. How do you approach plotting a novel?
Again, the plot develops organically as I write. I used to rush through a first draft and then rewrite and rewrite, but now, partly because I'm comfortable working on a computer, I tend to go back more often and add layers and new details as I go, so that I end up with a draft far closer to the final one than I used to.
"Cold is the Grave seems to be about coming to terms. Banks comes to terms with his marriage, some of the tragedies that have happened in his life and his children growing up. Yet at the very end, he realizes that the loss of innocence will never stop happening to him. How do you think this will affect his outlook on life?
I'm not sure that he has come to terms with things as much as he has taken the first step: recognizing that t

Synopsis:

The nude photo of a teenage runaway shows up on a pornographic website, and the girl's father turns to Detective Chief Inspector Alan banks for help. But these are typical circumstances, for the runaway is the daughter of a man who's determined to destroy the dedicated Yorkshire policeman's career and good name. Still it is a case that strikes painfully home, one that Banks—a father himself—dares not ignore as he follows it's squalid trail into teeming London, and into a world of drugs, sex, and crime. But murder follows soon after—gruesome ,sensational, and, more than once—pulling Banks in a direction that he dearly does not wish to go: into the past and private world of his most powerful enemy, Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle.

About the Author

Peter Robinson grew up in Yorkshire, England. His previous Inspector Banks novels include In a Dry Season, which was nominated for the Edgar and won the Anthony Award, and was named a New York Times Notable Book. His most recent Inspector Banks novel, Aftermath, was an international bestseller.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780380809356
Subtitle:
A Novel of Suspense
Author:
Robinson, Peter
Author:
by Peter Robinson
Publisher:
Avon
Subject:
Police
Subject:
England
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Police Procedural
Subject:
Mystery fiction
Subject:
Police - England - Yorkshire
Subject:
Mystery-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market PB
Series:
Inspector Banks Novels
Series Volume:
11
Publication Date:
20010904
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
7.00x4.30x1.17 in. .48 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z

Cold Is the Grave: A Novel of Suspense Used Mass Market
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Product details 448 pages Avon Books - English 9780380809356 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The nude photo of a teenage runaway shows up on a pornographic website, and the girl's father turns to Detective Chief Inspector Alan banks for help. But these are typical circumstances, for the runaway is the daughter of a man who's determined to destroy the dedicated Yorkshire policeman's career and good name. Still it is a case that strikes painfully home, one that Banks—a father himself—dares not ignore as he follows it's squalid trail into teeming London, and into a world of drugs, sex, and crime. But murder follows soon after—gruesome ,sensational, and, more than once—pulling Banks in a direction that he dearly does not wish to go: into the past and private world of his most powerful enemy, Chief Constable Jimmy Riddle.
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