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The Train to Lo Wu

The Train to Lo Wu Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"No one quite understands anyone else in Row's Hong Kong, a city suffused by a pervasive sense of alienation. In the seven stories of this debut collection, Row's protagonists — American expats and locals alike — flail about, either helplessly or harmfully, as blind as Alice in the first story, 'The Secrets of Bats,' who wanders around in a blindfold, trying to gain a bat's sense of orientation. The narrator of the title story, a wealthy man from Hong Kong, falls in love with a Chinese woman named Lin. Political strictures make their situation difficult, but cultural differences ultimately divide them. The narrator (whose family has lived in Hong Kong for five generations) is optimistic and resourceful; Lin (crushed all her life by the Chinese system) cannot abandon her pessimism. In 'For You,' the marriage of an American couple disintegrates after they move to Hong Kong, and the husband, Lewis, temporarily joins a Buddhist monastery — just one example of the way personal breakdowns tend to follow political displacement in Row's stories. At the monastery, Lewis is told: 'Mistakes are your mirror.... They reflect your mind. Don't try to slip away from them.' In sharp, lucid prose, Row molds a landscape of human error and uncertainty, territory well-aligned with the eerie topography of his space-age city. Agent, Elyse Cheney. Forecast: This is another fine addition to a growing class of fiction by young Americans with experience abroad — see also John Dalton's Heaven Lake, Nell Freudenberger's Lucky Girls and Rattawut Lapcharoensap's Sightseeing." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385337908
Publisher:
Dial Press
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Author:
Row, Jess
Subject:
Hong Kong (China)
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20060131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.55x5.28x.47 in. .54 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Train to Lo Wu
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 208 pages Dial Press - English 9780385337908 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "No one quite understands anyone else in Row's Hong Kong, a city suffused by a pervasive sense of alienation. In the seven stories of this debut collection, Row's protagonists — American expats and locals alike — flail about, either helplessly or harmfully, as blind as Alice in the first story, 'The Secrets of Bats,' who wanders around in a blindfold, trying to gain a bat's sense of orientation. The narrator of the title story, a wealthy man from Hong Kong, falls in love with a Chinese woman named Lin. Political strictures make their situation difficult, but cultural differences ultimately divide them. The narrator (whose family has lived in Hong Kong for five generations) is optimistic and resourceful; Lin (crushed all her life by the Chinese system) cannot abandon her pessimism. In 'For You,' the marriage of an American couple disintegrates after they move to Hong Kong, and the husband, Lewis, temporarily joins a Buddhist monastery — just one example of the way personal breakdowns tend to follow political displacement in Row's stories. At the monastery, Lewis is told: 'Mistakes are your mirror.... They reflect your mind. Don't try to slip away from them.' In sharp, lucid prose, Row molds a landscape of human error and uncertainty, territory well-aligned with the eerie topography of his space-age city. Agent, Elyse Cheney. Forecast: This is another fine addition to a growing class of fiction by young Americans with experience abroad — see also John Dalton's Heaven Lake, Nell Freudenberger's Lucky Girls and Rattawut Lapcharoensap's Sightseeing." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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