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Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Benjamin Parzybok: IMG A Brief History of Video Games Played by Mayors, Presidents, and Emperors



Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »
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1 Burnside Poetry- A to Z

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Bicentennial: Poems

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Bicentennial: Poems Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Overtime

In this alternate basketball nobody plays,

Both players try to tie the score:

That way, at the buzzer, the game isn’t over.

 

Look, a show of courtesy: the winning player

Is helping the loser score, the way

Our youths assist the cold, suffering elderly.

 

Or here, a boy is helped to understand

The exotica of his changing body:

When X turns to Y you do not die;

 

When Y turns to Z we call it joy;

This process crests until someday

You fall off the edge of the alphabet.

 

The players play even when they do not play;

See, in just this way, we grow old

Alongside the returned jays and fat magnolias;

 

The game goes on forever this way, the players

Suspended in infinite overtimes,

The score climbing in never-changing change—

 

Until the day the backboard shatters

And the blackboard blossoms

With arcane formulae and blackbird wings.

 

 

7. lullaby

Oh, all the stars, and the Big Dipper,

And their reflections in the ocean:

It doesn’t matter, it doesn’t matter;

 

And the creatures, their weird behaviors,

Some made to thrive, and some to die;

Part of their natures, part of their natures;

 

It doesn’t matter, it happens later:

All of creation, the seven days,

The famous storm, the rainbow after;

 

One day the cardinal, he wakes up red;

One day the jay realizes why

Of all the creatures, he got his color:

 

This happens later, tonight, good night.

When someone wins, somebody loses:

Something is ravaged, something is fed;

 

All of history, even the Romans,

They happen later, tonight sleep tight.

You’ll learn this later. Tonight, good night.

 

 

The Flume

Here we go up again, up again, the mountain

The men who have assembled it for years

Assembled yesterday, so that you and I

 

Headed who knows where together, but

Headed there together, will see

From the top the bottom, from the bottom the top,

 

Then feel the inside-outside-all-over-nowhere

My God I Am Going to Die, Not Someday, Now

Sensation that, once we plateau, feels silly,

 

Since when were we safer than when we sought

The danger that when it subsided returned

Us to the dangers it had blotted out?

 

There are no fears, here at the start:

This is when, the book just opened,

Knowing you will one day know the story

 

You don’t know yet changes the story

You are getting to know, the way we know

Before we know what anything means it means

 

Something: a fireworks display, the birthday

Of the Country; that’s me; my uncle and I

Are racing through the past on the Python,

 

Which men assembled absentmindedly that day

And, so you could visit it with me,

I assembled here again inside my memory;

 

Now, when you remember how things were

Today, you will also remember yourself

Looking forward to yourself looking back,

 

A looking back that, here in your past,

You do already, you already say

About what happened yesterday, remember when . . . ?

 

—The future doing its usual loop-de-loop,

The sons all turning into fathers

Until the absentminded men take the ride down.

Review:

"Chiasson (Where's the Moon, There's the Moon) delivers a fourth collection with his trademark poultice of wit, tightly honed formalism, and reimaginings of the world around him. In 'Away We Go,' where his speaker sarcastically sobs, 'O my collectible dinnerware,/ I've hunted everywhere for answers,' we find Chiasson addressing a bird as a member of the IRS auditing 'the Spring's enormous income/ while I piss my windfall zilch away.' 'I turned the pain up/ In my poetry,' he writes in 'Vital Signs,' and, true to his word, Chiasson explores a life lived without knowing his father through lenses of pop culture, history, and the raising of his own children. His more formally experimental writing, including two plays in verse and several poems that absorb echolalia, ventures into fascinating new territory, questioning the nature of existence and the creation of art with equal parts curiosity and dark resignation. 'If you exist,' says a faerie in 'The Ferris Wheel in Paris: A Play,' 'you must use your existence to erase every earthly trace of yourself.' Such booming statements set the stage for the book's eponymous closer, which moves via smash cuts through Chiasson's youth in 1976, arriving at a place of startling clarity through a voice unencumbered by either literary decoration or expectation. Chiasson clears a new path towards 'something enormous/ And potentially dangerous.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Dan Chiasson is the author of three previous collections of poetry, most recently Where’s the Moon, There's the Moon, and a book of criticism, One Kind of Everything: Poem and Person in Contemporary America. His essays on poetry appear widely. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Whiting Writers Award, Chiasson teaches at Wellesley College.

About the Author

US

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385349819
Author:
Chiasson, Dan
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Author:
Chiasson, Daniel
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
Single Author / American
Publication Date:
20140331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
96
Dimensions:
8.68 x 5.83 x 0.55 in 0.6 lb

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » Featured Titles
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Bicentennial: Poems Used Hardcover
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Product details 96 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780385349819 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Chiasson (Where's the Moon, There's the Moon) delivers a fourth collection with his trademark poultice of wit, tightly honed formalism, and reimaginings of the world around him. In 'Away We Go,' where his speaker sarcastically sobs, 'O my collectible dinnerware,/ I've hunted everywhere for answers,' we find Chiasson addressing a bird as a member of the IRS auditing 'the Spring's enormous income/ while I piss my windfall zilch away.' 'I turned the pain up/ In my poetry,' he writes in 'Vital Signs,' and, true to his word, Chiasson explores a life lived without knowing his father through lenses of pop culture, history, and the raising of his own children. His more formally experimental writing, including two plays in verse and several poems that absorb echolalia, ventures into fascinating new territory, questioning the nature of existence and the creation of art with equal parts curiosity and dark resignation. 'If you exist,' says a faerie in 'The Ferris Wheel in Paris: A Play,' 'you must use your existence to erase every earthly trace of yourself.' Such booming statements set the stage for the book's eponymous closer, which moves via smash cuts through Chiasson's youth in 1976, arriving at a place of startling clarity through a voice unencumbered by either literary decoration or expectation. Chiasson clears a new path towards 'something enormous/ And potentially dangerous.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Dan Chiasson is the author of three previous collections of poetry, most recently Where’s the Moon, There's the Moon, and a book of criticism, One Kind of Everything: Poem and Person in Contemporary America. His essays on poetry appear widely. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Whiting Writers Award, Chiasson teaches at Wellesley College.
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