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Descartes' Bones: A Skeletal History of the Conflict between Faith and Reason

by

Descartes' Bones: A Skeletal History of the Conflict between Faith and Reason Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On a brutal winter's day in 1650 in Stockholm, the Frenchman René Descartes, the most influential and controversial thinker of his time, was buried after a cold and lonely death far from home. Sixteen years later, the French Ambassador Hugues de Terlon secretly unearthed Descartes' bones and transported them to France.

Why would this devoutly Catholic official care so much about the remains of a philosopher who was hounded from country to country on charges of atheism? Why would Descartes' bones take such a strange, serpentine path over the next 350 years—a path intersecting some of the grandest events imaginable: the birth of science, the rise of democracy, the mind-body problem, the conflict between faith and reason? Their story involves people from all walks of life—Louis XIV, a Swedish casino operator, poets and playwrights, philosophers and physicists, as these people used the bones in scientific studies, stole them, sold them, revered them as relics, fought over them, passed them surreptitiously from hand to hand.

The answer lies in Descartes’ famous phrase: Cogito ergo sum—"I think, therefore I am." In his deceptively simple seventy-eight-page essay, Discourse on the Method, this small, vain, vindictive, peripatetic, ambitious Frenchman destroyed 2,000 years of received wisdom and laid the foundations of the modern world. At the root of Descartes’ “method” was skepticism: "What can I know for certain?" Like-minded thinkers around Europe passionately embraced the book--the method was applied to medicine, nature, politics, and society. The notion that one could find truth in facts that could be proved, and not in reliance on tradition and the Church's teachings, would become a turning point in human history.

In an age of faith, what Descartes was proposing seemed like heresy. Yet Descartes himself was a good Catholic, who was spurred to write his incendiary book for the most personal of reasons: He had devoted himself to medicine and the study of nature, but when his beloved daughter died at the age of five, he took his ideas deeper. To understand the natural world one needed to question everything. Thus the scientific method was created and religion overthrown. If the natural world could be understood, knowledge could be advanced, and others might not suffer as his child did.

The great controversy Descartes ignited continues to our era: where Islamic terrorists spurn the modern world and pine for a culture based on unquestioning faith; where scientists write bestsellers that passionately make the case for atheism; where others struggle to find a balance between faith and reason.

Descartes’ Bonesis a historical detective story about the creation of the modern mind, with twists and turns leading up to the present day—to the science museum in Paris where the philosopher’s skull now resides and to the church a few kilometers away where, not long ago, a philosopher-priest said a mass for his bones.

Synopsis:

The best-selling author of The Island at the Center of the World chronicles the more than three-hundred-year debate between religion and science as revealed through the long and momentous odyssey of the skeletal remains of French philosopher Ren

Synopsis:

A New York Times Notable BookSixteen years after Reneeacute; Descartes' death in Stockholm in 1650, a pious French ambassador exhumed the remains of the controversialphilosopher to transport them back to Paris. Thus began a 350-year saga that saw Descartes' bones traverse a continent, passing between kings, philosophers, poets, and painters. But as Russell Shorto shows in this deeplyengaging book, Descartes' bones also played a role in some of the most momentous episodes in history, which are also part of the philosopher's metaphorical remains: the birth of science, the rise of democracy, and theearliest debates between reason and faith. Descartes' Bones is a flesh-and-blood story about the battle between religion and rationalism that rages to this day.

Fromthe Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

RUSSELL SHORTO is the bestselling author of The Island at the Center of the World and a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine. He lives in Amsterdam.

Table of Contents

The man who died — Banquet of bones — Unholy relics — The misplaced head — Cranial capacity — Habeas corpus — A modern face.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385528375
Subtitle:
A Skeletal History of the Conflict between Faith and Reason
Publisher:
Doubleday
Author:
Shorto, Russell
Author:
Russell Shorto
Subject:
History : General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Modern - General
Subject:
Faith
Subject:
Reason
Subject:
Descartes, Rene
Subject:
Religion & Science
Subject:
History & Surveys - 17th/18th Century
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Subject:
Western Civilization-General
Subject:
World History-1650 to Present
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
World History-France
Subject:
Christianity -- Apologetics.
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20081014
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
299

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Religion » Christianity » General
Religion » World Religions » Religion and Science

Descartes' Bones: A Skeletal History of the Conflict between Faith and Reason
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Product details 299 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780385528375 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The best-selling author of The Island at the Center of the World chronicles the more than three-hundred-year debate between religion and science as revealed through the long and momentous odyssey of the skeletal remains of French philosopher Ren
"Synopsis" by , A New York Times Notable BookSixteen years after Reneeacute; Descartes' death in Stockholm in 1650, a pious French ambassador exhumed the remains of the controversialphilosopher to transport them back to Paris. Thus began a 350-year saga that saw Descartes' bones traverse a continent, passing between kings, philosophers, poets, and painters. But as Russell Shorto shows in this deeplyengaging book, Descartes' bones also played a role in some of the most momentous episodes in history, which are also part of the philosopher's metaphorical remains: the birth of science, the rise of democracy, and theearliest debates between reason and faith. Descartes' Bones is a flesh-and-blood story about the battle between religion and rationalism that rages to this day.

Fromthe Trade Paperback edition.

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