This is Real Life Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | February 16, 2015

    Mary Pilon: IMG The Coffee Shops I Have Loved



    "Should I kill myself, or have a cup of coffee?" – Albert Camus In the five years it took for me to complete my book, The Monopolists, I wrote... Continue »

    spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life

by

Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“People who take God seriously will not remain silent about their faith. They will often disagree about doctrine or policy, but they won’t be quiet. They can’t be. They’ll act on what they believe, sometimes at the cost of their reputations and careers. Obviously the common good demands a respect for other people with different beliefs and a willingness to compromise whenever possible. But for Catholics, the common good can never mean muting themselves in public debate on foundational issues of human dignity. Christian faith is always personal but never private. This is why any notion of tolerance that tries to reduce faith to private idiosyncrasy, or a set of opinions that we can indulge at home but need to be quiet about in public, will always fail.”

—From the Introduction

Few topics in recent years have ignited as much public debate as the balance between religion and politics. Does religious thought have any place in political discourse? Do religious believers have the right to turn their values into political action? What does it truly mean to have a separation of church and state? The very heart of these important questions is here addressed by one of the leading voices on the topic, Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Denver.

While American society has ample room for believers and nonbelievers alike, Chaput argues, our public life must be considered within the context of its Christian roots. American democracy does not ask its citizens to put aside their deeply held moral and religious beliefs for the sake of public policy. In fact, it requires exactly the opposite.

As the nation’s founders knew very well, people are fallible. The majority of voters, as history has shown again and again, can be uninformed, misinformed, biased, or simply wrong. Thus, to survive, American democracy depends on an engaged citizenry —people of character, including religious believers, fighting for their beliefs in the public square—respectfully but vigorously, and without apology. Anything less is bad citizenship and a form of theft from the nation’s health. Or as the author suggests: Good manners are not an excuse for political cowardice.

American Catholics and other persons of goodwill are part of a struggle for our nation’s future, says Charles J. Chaput. Our choices, including our political choices, matter. Catholics need to take an active, vocal, and morally consistent role in public debate. We can’t claim to personally believe in the sanctity of the human person, and then act in our public policies as if we don’t. We can’t separate our private convictions from our public actions without diminishing both. In the words of the author, “How we act works backward on our convictions, making them stronger or smothering them under a snowfall of alibis.”

Vivid, provocative, clear, and compelling, Render unto Caesar is a call to American Catholics to serve the highest ideals of their nation by first living their Catholic faith deeply, authentically.

Synopsis:

An outspoken leader of the American Catholic Church tackes some of the tough moral issues that divide modern-day America, redefining the link between personal morality and the public sphere, defending the right of religious people to express their beliefs in public, and arguing that a dual commitment to faith and democracy holds the key to revitalizing America. 20,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

People who take God seriously will not remain silent about their faith. They will often disagree about doctrine or policy, but they won't be quiet. They can't be. They'll act on what they believe, sometimes at the cost of their reputations and careers. Obviously the common good demands a respect for other people with different beliefs and a willingness to compromise whenever possible. But for Catholics, the common good can never mean muting themselves in public debate on foundational issues of human dignity. Christian faith is always personal but never private. This is why any notion of tolerance that tries to reduce faith to private idiosyncrasy, or a set of opinions that we can indulge at home but need to be quiet about in public, will always fail.

From the Introduction

Few topics in recent years have ignited as much public debate as the balance between religion and politics. Does religious thought have any place in political discourse? Do religious believers have the right to turn their values into political action? What does it truly mean to have a separation of church and state? The very heart of these important questions is here addressed by one of the leading voices on the topic, Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Denver.

While American society has ample room for believers and nonbelievers alike, Chaput argues, our public life must be considered within the context of its Christian roots. American democracy does not ask its citizens to put aside their deeply held moral and religious beliefs for the sake of public policy. In fact, it requires exactly the opposite.

As the nation's founders knew very well, people are fallible. The majority of voters, as history has shown again and again, can be uninformed, misinformed, biased, or simply wrong. Thus, to survive, American democracy depends on an engaged citizenry people of character, including religious believers, fighting for their beliefs in the public square respectfully but vigorously, and without apology. Anything less is bad citizenship and a form of theft from the nation's health. Or as the

About the Author

CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. Cap., is the archbishop of Denver, a Capuchin Franciscan, and a former member of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. He lives in Denver, Colorado. He is the author, previously, of Living the Catholic Faith: Rediscovering the Basics.

Table of Contents

Starting at the source — Men without chests — Why we're here — Constantine's children — The American experiment — A new dispensation — What went wrong — Conscience and cowardice — A man for all seasons — What needs to be done — Faithful citizens — Afterward: Some final thoughts.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385528597
Subtitle:
Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life
Publisher:
Doubleday
Author:
Chaput, Charles J.
Author:
Charles J. Chaput
Subject:
Religion : Christian Life - General
Subject:
Religion : Religion, Politics & State
Subject:
Church and state
Subject:
Catholic church
Subject:
Christian Life - General
Subject:
Christian Life - Inspirational - Catholic
Subject:
Christian Life - Political Issues
Subject:
Christianity and politics -- United States.
Subject:
Church and state -- United States.
Subject:
Christian Life
Subject:
Catechisms
Subject:
Christianity - Catholicism
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20080812
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
258

Related Subjects

Religion » Christianity » General
Religion » Christianity » Inspirational
Religion » Western Religions » Social and Political Issues
Religion » Western Religions » Theology

Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 258 pages Doubleday Religious Publishing Group - English 9780385528597 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An outspoken leader of the American Catholic Church tackes some of the tough moral issues that divide modern-day America, redefining the link between personal morality and the public sphere, defending the right of religious people to express their beliefs in public, and arguing that a dual commitment to faith and democracy holds the key to revitalizing America. 20,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , People who take God seriously will not remain silent about their faith. They will often disagree about doctrine or policy, but they won't be quiet. They can't be. They'll act on what they believe, sometimes at the cost of their reputations and careers. Obviously the common good demands a respect for other people with different beliefs and a willingness to compromise whenever possible. But for Catholics, the common good can never mean muting themselves in public debate on foundational issues of human dignity. Christian faith is always personal but never private. This is why any notion of tolerance that tries to reduce faith to private idiosyncrasy, or a set of opinions that we can indulge at home but need to be quiet about in public, will always fail.

From the Introduction

Few topics in recent years have ignited as much public debate as the balance between religion and politics. Does religious thought have any place in political discourse? Do religious believers have the right to turn their values into political action? What does it truly mean to have a separation of church and state? The very heart of these important questions is here addressed by one of the leading voices on the topic, Charles J. Chaput, Archbishop of Denver.

While American society has ample room for believers and nonbelievers alike, Chaput argues, our public life must be considered within the context of its Christian roots. American democracy does not ask its citizens to put aside their deeply held moral and religious beliefs for the sake of public policy. In fact, it requires exactly the opposite.

As the nation's founders knew very well, people are fallible. The majority of voters, as history has shown again and again, can be uninformed, misinformed, biased, or simply wrong. Thus, to survive, American democracy depends on an engaged citizenry people of character, including religious believers, fighting for their beliefs in the public square respectfully but vigorously, and without apology. Anything less is bad citizenship and a form of theft from the nation's health. Or as the

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.