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The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics

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The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[A]n eye-opening and absorbing account of their relationship....The Radical and the Republican is ideological more often than anecdotal and is not a light read. But the book succeeds quite well at charting the ups and downs of a complex and seminal relationship between two great men, both dedicated to making America live up to its loftiest ideals." Chuck Leddy, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire CSM review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A major history of Civil War America through the lens of its two towering figures: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

"My husband considered you a dear friend," Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln's assassination. The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the president and the most famous black man in America — their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil War, and emancipation. Opponents at first, they gradually became allies, each influenced by and attracted to the other. Their three meetings in the White House signaled a profound shift in the direction of the Civil War, and in the fate of the United States.

In this first book to draw the two together, James Oakes has written a masterful narrative history. He brings these two iconic figures to life and sheds new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.

Review:

"The perennial tension between principle and pragmatism in politics frames this engaging account of two Civil War Era icons. Historian Oakes (Slavery and Freedom) charts the course by which Douglass and Lincoln, initially far apart on the antislavery spectrum, gravitated toward each other. Lincoln began as a moderate who advocated banning slavery in the territories while tolerating it in the South, rejected social equality for blacks and wanted to send freedmen overseas — and wound up abolishing slavery outright and increasingly supporting black voting rights. Conversely, the abolitionist firebrand Douglass moved from an impatient, self-marginalizing moral rectitude to a recognition of compromise, coalition building and incremental goals as necessary steps forward in a democracy. Douglass's views on race were essentially modern; the book is really a study through his eyes of the more complex figure of Lincoln. Oakes lucidly explores how political realities and military necessity influenced Lincoln's tortuous path to emancipation, and asks whether his often bigoted pronouncements represented real conviction or strategic concessions to white racism. As Douglass shifts from denouncing Lincoln's foot-dragging to revering his achievements, Oakes vividly conveys both the immense distance America traveled to arrive at a more enlightened place and the fraught politics that brought it there." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A sharp analysis....A readable account of the intersection of Lincoln and Douglass's careers, but an even better demonstration of the interplay between the agendas of passionate, single-minded reformers...and the talented politicians who master the art of the possible." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"At first glance, Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass might seem to have been of one mind regarding slavery....However much they agreed about slavery, though, the two men differed considerably over how to end it. That quarrel animates James Oakes's riveting and original The Radical and the Republican." The Wall Street Journal

Book News Annotation:

Oakes (history, City U. of New York) examines how the abolitionist and former slave, Frederick Douglass, and the pragmatic anti-slavery politician, President Abraham Lincoln, began from positions of relative mutual antipathy--with Douglass frequently denouncing Lincoln's compromises and Lincoln just as frequently taking care to personally disavow the "radical" positions of the abolitionist movement--towards a mutual respect that would lead to Lincoln inviting Douglass to the White House twice and Douglass fastening his allegiance to Lincoln's Republican Party. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

In this major history of Civil War America as seen through the lens of its two towering figures, Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, Oakes presents a masterful narrative history that brings these two iconic figures to life and sheds new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality during the era.

About the Author

James Oakes, professor of history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, is the author of acclaimed works on slavery and the South. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393061949
Subtitle:
Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics
Publisher:
Norton
Author:
Oakes, James
Subject:
Friendship
Subject:
United States - Civil War
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Political History
Subject:
United States - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
January 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Slavery and Reconstruction
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 320 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393061949 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The perennial tension between principle and pragmatism in politics frames this engaging account of two Civil War Era icons. Historian Oakes (Slavery and Freedom) charts the course by which Douglass and Lincoln, initially far apart on the antislavery spectrum, gravitated toward each other. Lincoln began as a moderate who advocated banning slavery in the territories while tolerating it in the South, rejected social equality for blacks and wanted to send freedmen overseas — and wound up abolishing slavery outright and increasingly supporting black voting rights. Conversely, the abolitionist firebrand Douglass moved from an impatient, self-marginalizing moral rectitude to a recognition of compromise, coalition building and incremental goals as necessary steps forward in a democracy. Douglass's views on race were essentially modern; the book is really a study through his eyes of the more complex figure of Lincoln. Oakes lucidly explores how political realities and military necessity influenced Lincoln's tortuous path to emancipation, and asks whether his often bigoted pronouncements represented real conviction or strategic concessions to white racism. As Douglass shifts from denouncing Lincoln's foot-dragging to revering his achievements, Oakes vividly conveys both the immense distance America traveled to arrive at a more enlightened place and the fraught politics that brought it there." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[A]n eye-opening and absorbing account of their relationship....The Radical and the Republican is ideological more often than anecdotal and is not a light read. But the book succeeds quite well at charting the ups and downs of a complex and seminal relationship between two great men, both dedicated to making America live up to its loftiest ideals." (read the entire CSM review)
"Review" by , "A sharp analysis....A readable account of the intersection of Lincoln and Douglass's careers, but an even better demonstration of the interplay between the agendas of passionate, single-minded reformers...and the talented politicians who master the art of the possible."
"Review" by , "At first glance, Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass might seem to have been of one mind regarding slavery....However much they agreed about slavery, though, the two men differed considerably over how to end it. That quarrel animates James Oakes's riveting and original The Radical and the Republican."
"Synopsis" by , In this major history of Civil War America as seen through the lens of its two towering figures, Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, Oakes presents a masterful narrative history that brings these two iconic figures to life and sheds new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality during the era.
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