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Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography

by

Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography Cover

ISBN13: 9780393065732
ISBN10: 0393065731
Condition:
All Product Details

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Review-A-Day

"...[F]or Keats, his had long been a hope at once firm and tentative: 'I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death.' For it is I think that gives the asseveration such grace and dignity, so that a small but not insignificant wrong is done when (on a couple of occasions in Posthumous Keats) his precisely guarded hope is indurated into 'his statement to his brother George, in 1818, that he would be among the English poets after his death,' within 'a future that meant to place him 'among the English poets.'" Christopher Ricks, New York Review of Books (read the entire New York Review of Books review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Posthumous Keats is the result of Stanley Plumly's twenty years of reflection on the enduring afterlife of one of England's greatest Romanticists. John Keats's famous epitaph "Here lies One Whose Name was writ in Water" helped cement his reputation as the archetype of the genius cut off before his time. Keats, dead of tuberculosis at twenty-five, saw his mortality as fatal to his poetry, and therein, Plumly argues, lies his tragedy: Keats thought he had failed in his mission "to be among the English poets."

In this close narrative study, Plumly meditates on the chances for poetic immortality'"an idea that finds its purest expression in Keats, whose poetic influence remains immense. Incisive in its observations and beautifully written, Posthumous Keats is an ode to an unsuspecting young poet'"a man who, against the odds of his culture and critics, managed to achieve the unthinkable: the elevation of the lyric poem to sublime and tragic status.

Review:

"The great English poet John Keats (1795 — 1821) wrote his last complete poems in the fall of 1819; already ill from tuberculosis, he traveled to Italy with his friend Joseph Severn in a doomed attempt to get well, and died in Rome after a year of getting worse. The prolific and widely honored poet Plumly (Old Heart) offers seven informative, overlapping chapters that consider aspects, consequences and echoes from that sad last year of Keats's life. Plumly discusses artists' portraits of the poet (among them Severn's arresting deathbed sketch). He examines the lives and motives of the people closest to Keats, such as the faithful Severn (who outlived the poet by decades), the perhaps faithless (but perhaps not) Charles Brown and Keats's fiance, Fanny Brawne. He considers Keats's love letters, Keats's medical training, Keatsian and Shelleyan landmarks in Rome, the fate of Keats's manuscripts and, finally, Keats's sense of his own life, as bound up in the poems. Plumly's linked essays incorporate old-school scholarship, but never seem dry or academic in the bad sense: the result feels 'personal' indeed, if never autobiographical. At times Plumly seems unsure for whom he is writing. At other times, though, his unstinting admiration and evocative prose promise to create Keatsians yet unknown." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"At the end of November 1820, after more than a year of nursing an ailing stomach and succumbing to the ravages of consumption, John Keats wrote his friend Charles Brown, 'I have an habitual feeling of my real life having past, and that I am leading a posthumous existence.' It was not the first time that Keats had described this sensation in his letters, but it was the last. Less than three months... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Book News Annotation:

In his account of the possible and potential afterlife of British Romantic poet John Keats (1795-1821), Plumly (U. of Maryland-College Park) sought a middle voice between limited first person and omniscient third person. He also avoids a linear narrative pasted together from found biographia. Some of the chapters have been published as separate essays. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

A Los Angeles TimesFavorite Book and a Washington PostBest of 2008: 'A book worthy of Keats'"full of feeling and drama and those fleeting moments we call genius."Ted Genoways, Washington Post Book World

Synopsis:

An acclaimed American poet reflects on the life and legacy of John Keats.

Synopsis:

Posthumous Keats is the result of Stanley Plumly's twenty years of reflection on the enduring afterlife of one of England's greatest Romanticists. John Keats's famous epitaph--"Here lies One Whose Name was writ in Water"--helped cement his reputation as the archetype of the genius cut off before his time. Keats, dead of tuberculosis at twenty-five, saw his mortality as fatal to his poetry, and therein, Plumly argues, lies his tragedy: Keats thought he had failed in his mission "to be among the English poets."

In this close narrative study, Plumly meditates on the chances for poetic immortality--an idea that finds its purest expression in Keats, whose poetic influence remains immense. Incisive in its observations and beautifully written, Posthumous Keats is an ode to an unsuspecting young poet--a man who, against the odds of his culture and critics, managed to achieve the unthinkable: the elevation of the lyric poem to sublime and tragic status.

About the Author

Stanley Plumly is a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. He lives in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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matthew h. patton, May 25, 2009 (view all comments by matthew h. patton)
If the book is as well written as this review it must be wonderful indeed!
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780393065732
Subtitle:
A Personal Biography
Author:
Plumly, Stanley
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Poets, English
Subject:
19th century
Subject:
Influence
Subject:
Poets, English -- 19th century.
Subject:
Keats, John
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080517
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.6 x 5.9 x 1.2 in 1.235 lb

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Related Subjects

Biography » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
History and Social Science » World History » General

Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.98 In Stock
Product details 288 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393065732 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The great English poet John Keats (1795 — 1821) wrote his last complete poems in the fall of 1819; already ill from tuberculosis, he traveled to Italy with his friend Joseph Severn in a doomed attempt to get well, and died in Rome after a year of getting worse. The prolific and widely honored poet Plumly (Old Heart) offers seven informative, overlapping chapters that consider aspects, consequences and echoes from that sad last year of Keats's life. Plumly discusses artists' portraits of the poet (among them Severn's arresting deathbed sketch). He examines the lives and motives of the people closest to Keats, such as the faithful Severn (who outlived the poet by decades), the perhaps faithless (but perhaps not) Charles Brown and Keats's fiance, Fanny Brawne. He considers Keats's love letters, Keats's medical training, Keatsian and Shelleyan landmarks in Rome, the fate of Keats's manuscripts and, finally, Keats's sense of his own life, as bound up in the poems. Plumly's linked essays incorporate old-school scholarship, but never seem dry or academic in the bad sense: the result feels 'personal' indeed, if never autobiographical. At times Plumly seems unsure for whom he is writing. At other times, though, his unstinting admiration and evocative prose promise to create Keatsians yet unknown." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "...[F]or Keats, his had long been a hope at once firm and tentative: 'I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death.' For it is I think that gives the asseveration such grace and dignity, so that a small but not insignificant wrong is done when (on a couple of occasions in Posthumous Keats) his precisely guarded hope is indurated into 'his statement to his brother George, in 1818, that he would be among the English poets after his death,' within 'a future that meant to place him 'among the English poets.'" (read the entire New York Review of Books review)
"Synopsis" by , A Los Angeles TimesFavorite Book and a Washington PostBest of 2008: 'A book worthy of Keats'"full of feeling and drama and those fleeting moments we call genius."Ted Genoways, Washington Post Book World
"Synopsis" by , An acclaimed American poet reflects on the life and legacy of John Keats.
"Synopsis" by , Posthumous Keats is the result of Stanley Plumly's twenty years of reflection on the enduring afterlife of one of England's greatest Romanticists. John Keats's famous epitaph--"Here lies One Whose Name was writ in Water"--helped cement his reputation as the archetype of the genius cut off before his time. Keats, dead of tuberculosis at twenty-five, saw his mortality as fatal to his poetry, and therein, Plumly argues, lies his tragedy: Keats thought he had failed in his mission "to be among the English poets."

In this close narrative study, Plumly meditates on the chances for poetic immortality--an idea that finds its purest expression in Keats, whose poetic influence remains immense. Incisive in its observations and beautifully written, Posthumous Keats is an ode to an unsuspecting young poet--a man who, against the odds of his culture and critics, managed to achieve the unthinkable: the elevation of the lyric poem to sublime and tragic status.

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