Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | November 29, 2014

    Neil Patrick Harris: IMG Neil Patrick Harris: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer

On Order

$43.25
New Trade Paper
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Film and Television- Reference

Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism #32: The Dark Mirror: German Cinema Between Hitler and Hollywood

by

Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism #32: The Dark Mirror: German Cinema Between Hitler and Hollywood Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Lutz Koepnick's The Dark Mirror provides one of the finest, most compelling and suggestive accounts to date of the multiple locations of German cinema between Hitler and Hollywood. Charting the shifting relationships between institutional contexts and individual acts of reception, Koepnick persuasively shows how the German cinema and its filmmakers—both in exile and in Nazi Germany—contributed to a fragile, stratified, indeed, "nonsynchronous" public sphere."—Patrice Petro, author of Aftershocks of the New: Feminism and Film History

"Lutz Koepnick's brilliant study debunks the received wisdom concerning Nazi German and Hollywood film of the 1930s and 40s. Using detailed analyses of 8 films, with special focus on sound and music, he insists upon the disjointed contexts and uneven relationships of American and German filmmaking. Historically nuanced and theoretically savvy, this remarkable book offers something for everyone: Americanists, Germanists, historians, students of cinema sound and music, those interested in debates between art and popular forms, and European and Hollywood production."—Caryl Flinn, author of Strains of Utopia

Synopsis:

An analysis of the complicated relationship between two cinemas - Hollywood's and Nazi Germany's - in this theoretically and politically incisive study. The text examines the split course of German popular film from the early 1930s until the mid 1950s.

Synopsis:

"Lutz Koepnick's "The Dark Mirror provides one of the finest, most compelling and suggestive accounts to date of the multiple locations of German cinema between Hitler and Hollywood. Charting the shifting relationships between institutional contexts and individual acts of reception, Koepnick persuasively shows how the German cinema and its filmmakers--both in exile and in Nazi Germany--contributed to a fragile, stratified, indeed, "nonsynchronous" public sphere."--Patrice Petro, author of "Aftershocks of the New: Feminism and Film History

"Lutz Koepnick's brilliant study debunks the received wisdom concerning Nazi German and Hollywood film of the 1930s and 40s. Using detailed analyses of 8 films, with special focus on sound and music, he insists upon the disjointed contexts and uneven relationships of American and German filmmaking. Historically nuanced and theoretically savvy, this remarkable book offers something for everyone: Americanists, Germanists, historians, students of cinema sound and music, those interested in debates between art and popular forms, and European and Hollywood production."--Caryl Flinn, author of "Strains of Utopia

Synopsis:

Berlin School Glossary is the first major publication to mark the increasing international importance of a group of contemporary German and Austrian filmmakers initially known by the name the Berlin School: Christian Petzold, Thomas Arslan, Christoph Hochhandauml;usler, Jessica Hausner, and others. The study elaborates on the innovative strategies and formal techniques that distinguish these films, specifically questions of movement, space, spectatorship, representation, desire, location, and narrative. Abandoning the usual format of essay-length analyses of individual films and directors, the volume is organized as an actual glossary with entries such as bad sex, cars, the cut, endings, familiar places, forests, ghosts, hotels, interiority, landscapes, siblings, surveillance, swimming pools, and wind. This unique format combined with an informative introduction will be essential to scholars and fans of the German New Wave

Synopsis:

Lutz Koepnick analyzes the complicated relationship between two cinemas—Hollywood's and Nazi Germany's—in this theoretically and politically incisive study. The Dark Mirror examines the split course of German popular film from the early 1930s until the mid 1950s, showing how Nazi filmmakers appropriated Hollywood conventions and how German film exiles reworked German cultural material in their efforts to find a working base in the Hollywood studio system. Through detailed readings of specific films, Koepnick provides a vivid sense of the give and take between German and American cinema.

About the Author

Lutz Koepnick is Associate Professor of German and Film and Media Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the author of Walter Benjamin and the Aesthetics of Power (1999) and Nothungs Modernität: Wagners Ring und die Poesie der Macht im neunzehnten Jahrhundert (1994).

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction: The Dark Mirror

PART 1: HOLLYWOOD in BERLIN, 1933–1939

Chapter 1 Sounds of Silence: Nazi Cinema and the Quest for a National Culture Industry

Chapter 2 Incorporating the Underground: Curtis Bernhardts The Tunnel

Chapter 3 Engendering Mass Culture: Zarah Leander and the Economy of Desire

Chapter 4 Siegfried Rides Again: Nazi Westerns and Modernity

PART 2: BERLIN in HOLLYWOOD, 1939–1955

Chapter 5 Wagner at Warners: German Sounds and Hollywood Studio Visions

Chapter 6 Berlin Noir: Robert Siodmaks Hollywood

Chapter 7 Pianos, Priests, and Popular Culture: Sirk, Lang, and the Legacy of American Populism

Chapter 8 Isolde Resurrected: Curtis Bernhardts Interrupted Melody

Epilogue: "Talking about Germany"

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520233119
Author:
Koepnick, Lutz P.
Publisher:
University of California Press
Author:
Kopp, Kristin
Author:
Koepnick, Lutz
Author:
Prager, Brad
Author:
Cook, Roger F.
Location:
Berkeley
Subject:
History
Subject:
Film - General
Subject:
Motion pictures
Subject:
Motion picture producers and directors
Subject:
Germans
Subject:
Film & Video - General
Subject:
Motion pictures -- Germany -- History.
Subject:
Film and Television-Reference
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism
Series Volume:
32
Publication Date:
20021031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 halftones
Pages:
334
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 0.6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Popular Cinema of the Third Reich New Trade Paper $32.50
  2. The Magic Mirror: Moviemaking in... New Trade Paper $18.75
  3. Cultural History Through a National... New Trade Paper $44.50

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Reference
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism #32: The Dark Mirror: German Cinema Between Hitler and Hollywood New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$43.25 Backorder
Product details 334 pages University of California Press - English 9780520233119 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An analysis of the complicated relationship between two cinemas - Hollywood's and Nazi Germany's - in this theoretically and politically incisive study. The text examines the split course of German popular film from the early 1930s until the mid 1950s.
"Synopsis" by , "Lutz Koepnick's "The Dark Mirror provides one of the finest, most compelling and suggestive accounts to date of the multiple locations of German cinema between Hitler and Hollywood. Charting the shifting relationships between institutional contexts and individual acts of reception, Koepnick persuasively shows how the German cinema and its filmmakers--both in exile and in Nazi Germany--contributed to a fragile, stratified, indeed, "nonsynchronous" public sphere."--Patrice Petro, author of "Aftershocks of the New: Feminism and Film History

"Lutz Koepnick's brilliant study debunks the received wisdom concerning Nazi German and Hollywood film of the 1930s and 40s. Using detailed analyses of 8 films, with special focus on sound and music, he insists upon the disjointed contexts and uneven relationships of American and German filmmaking. Historically nuanced and theoretically savvy, this remarkable book offers something for everyone: Americanists, Germanists, historians, students of cinema sound and music, those interested in debates between art and popular forms, and European and Hollywood production."--Caryl Flinn, author of "Strains of Utopia

"Synopsis" by ,
Berlin School Glossary is the first major publication to mark the increasing international importance of a group of contemporary German and Austrian filmmakers initially known by the name the Berlin School: Christian Petzold, Thomas Arslan, Christoph Hochhandauml;usler, Jessica Hausner, and others. The study elaborates on the innovative strategies and formal techniques that distinguish these films, specifically questions of movement, space, spectatorship, representation, desire, location, and narrative. Abandoning the usual format of essay-length analyses of individual films and directors, the volume is organized as an actual glossary with entries such as bad sex, cars, the cut, endings, familiar places, forests, ghosts, hotels, interiority, landscapes, siblings, surveillance, swimming pools, and wind. This unique format combined with an informative introduction will be essential to scholars and fans of the German New Wave

"Synopsis" by ,
Lutz Koepnick analyzes the complicated relationship between two cinemas—Hollywood's and Nazi Germany's—in this theoretically and politically incisive study. The Dark Mirror examines the split course of German popular film from the early 1930s until the mid 1950s, showing how Nazi filmmakers appropriated Hollywood conventions and how German film exiles reworked German cultural material in their efforts to find a working base in the Hollywood studio system. Through detailed readings of specific films, Koepnick provides a vivid sense of the give and take between German and American cinema.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.