Poetry Madness
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | March 10, 2015

    J. C. Hallman: IMG One in the Oven; or, Why You Should Suck It Up and Meet Your Favorite Author



    At first, I was dead set against it. I would not try to meet Nicholson Baker while I was writing a book about Nicholson Baker. I had a good reason... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$36.75
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
1 Remote Warehouse Cooking and Food- US Ethnic

This title in other editions

The Philosophy of Food

by

The Philosophy of Food Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Appetites for Thought offers up a delectable intellectual challenge: can we better understand the concepts of philosophers from their culinary choices? Guiding us around the philosopher’s banquet table with erudition, wit, and irreverence, Michel Onfray offers surprising insights on foods ranging from fillet of cod to barley soup, from sausage to wine and coffee.

Tracing the edible obsessions of philosophers from Diogenes to Sartre, Onfray considers how their ideas relate to their diets. Would Diogenes have been an opponent of civilization without his taste for raw octopus? Would Rousseau have been such a proponent of frugality if his daily menu had included something more than dairy products? Onfray offers a perfectly Kantian critique of the nose and palate, since “the idea obtained from them is more a representation of enjoyment than cognition of the external object.” He exposes Nietzsche’s grumpiness—really, Nietzsche grumpy?—about bad cooks and the retardation of human evolution, and he explores Sartre’s surrealist repulsion by shellfish because they are “food buried in an object, and you have to pry them out.”

A fun romp through the culinary likes and dislikes of our most famous thinkers, Appetites for Thought will intrigue, provoke, and entertain, and it might also make you ponder a bite to eat. 

Synopsis:

Appetites for Thought offers up a formidable intellectual challenge: can we better understand the concepts of philosophers from their culinary choices? Tracing the food obsessions of philosophers from Diogenes to Sartre, Michel Onfray—a philosopher himself—considers how their ideas relate to their diets: Would Diogenes have been an opponent of civilization without his taste for raw octopus? Would Rousseau have been such a proponent of frugality if his daily menu had included something more than dairy products? For Kant, the nose and palate are organs of sensation without nobility, for, as Kant writes, “the idea obtained from them is more a representation of enjoyment than cognition of the external object.” While for Nietzsche, “it is through bad female cooks—through the complete absence of reason in the kitchen, that the evolution of man has been longest retarded and most harmed.” Sartre was famously repulsed by shellfish (not to mention tomatoes) because it was “food buried in an object, and you have to pry it out”—and also renowned as the philosopher who developed a unique conception of nausea.

Appetites for Thought will intrigue, provoke, and entertain, and it might also make you fancy a snack.

Synopsis:

Contributors:

Johanna Berlin

Emily Brady

Jeffrey Burkhardt

David Castle

Gary Comstock

Keith Culver

Gary L. Francione

David Fraser

Julie Gold

William Hannah

Richard Haynes

Lisa Heldke

Matthias Kaiser

Carolyn Korsmeyer

Michiel Korthals

Gyorgy Scrinis

Roger Scruton

Kevin W. Sweeney

Paul Thompson

Stellan Welin

Synopsis:

This book explores food from a philosophical perspective, bringing together sixteen leading philosophers to consider the most basic questions about food: What is it exactly? What should we eat? How do we know it is safe? How should food be distributed? What is good food? David M. Kaplanand#8217;s erudite and informative introduction grounds the discussion, showing how philosophers since Plato have taken up questions about food, diet, agriculture, and animals. However, until recently, few have considered food a standard subject for serious philosophical debate. Each of the essays in this book brings in-depth analysis to many contemporary debates in food studiesand#151;Slow Food, sustainability, food safety, and politicsand#151;and addresses such issues as and#147;happy meat,and#8221; aquaculture, veganism, and table manners. The result is an extraordinary resource that guides readers to think more clearly and responsibly about what we consume and how we provide for ourselves, and illuminates the reasons why we act as we do.

About the Author

David M. Kaplan is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Texas.

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Philosophy of Food

David M. Kaplan

1. Real Men Have Manners

Roger Scruton

2. Down-Home Global Cooking: A Third Option between Cosmopolitanism and Localism

Lisa Heldke

3. Hunger Is the Best Sauce

Kevin Sweeney

4. Tastes, Smells, and Everyday Aesthetics

Emily Brady

5. Ethical Gourmandism

Carolyn Korsmeyer

6. Two Evils in Food Country: Hunger and Lack of Representation

Michiel Korthals

7. Ethics and Genetically Modified Food

Gary Comstock

8. The Ethics of Food Safety in the Twenty-First Century: Who Keeps the Public Good?

Jeffrey Burkhardt

9. The Myth of Happy Meat

Richard P. Haynes

10. The Problem of Happy Meat and the Importance of Vegan Education

Gary Francione

11. Animal Ethics and Food Production in the Twenty-First Century

David Fraser

12. Nature Politics and the Philosophy of Agriculture

Paul B. Thompson

13. The Ethics and Sustainability of Aquaculture

Matthias Kaiser

14. Scenarios for Food Security

David Castle, Keith Culver, and William Hannah

15. Nutritionism and Functional Foods

Gyorgy Scrinis

16. In Vitro Meat: What Are the Moral Issues?

Stellan Welin, Julie Gold, and Johanna Berlin

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520269347
Author:
Kaplan, David M. (edt)
Publisher:
University of California Press
Author:
Muecke, Stephen
Author:
Kaplan, David M.
Author:
Onfray, Michel
Author:
Barry, Donald
Subject:
Cooking and Food-US Ethnic
Subject:
Ethnic
Subject:
General Philosophy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
California Studies in Food and Culture
Series Volume:
39
Publication Date:
20120201
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6 tables
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5 in

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Food Writing » Gastronomic Literature
Cooking and Food » General
Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » United States » Ethnic
History and Social Science » Sociology » Agriculture and Food
Humanities » Philosophy » General

The Philosophy of Food New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.75 In Stock
Product details 320 pages University of California Press - English 9780520269347 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Appetites for Thought offers up a formidable intellectual challenge: can we better understand the concepts of philosophers from their culinary choices? Tracing the food obsessions of philosophers from Diogenes to Sartre, Michel Onfray—a philosopher himself—considers how their ideas relate to their diets: Would Diogenes have been an opponent of civilization without his taste for raw octopus? Would Rousseau have been such a proponent of frugality if his daily menu had included something more than dairy products? For Kant, the nose and palate are organs of sensation without nobility, for, as Kant writes, “the idea obtained from them is more a representation of enjoyment than cognition of the external object.” While for Nietzsche, “it is through bad female cooks—through the complete absence of reason in the kitchen, that the evolution of man has been longest retarded and most harmed.” Sartre was famously repulsed by shellfish (not to mention tomatoes) because it was “food buried in an object, and you have to pry it out”—and also renowned as the philosopher who developed a unique conception of nausea.

Appetites for Thought will intrigue, provoke, and entertain, and it might also make you fancy a snack.

"Synopsis" by ,
Contributors:

Johanna Berlin

Emily Brady

Jeffrey Burkhardt

David Castle

Gary Comstock

Keith Culver

Gary L. Francione

David Fraser

Julie Gold

William Hannah

Richard Haynes

Lisa Heldke

Matthias Kaiser

Carolyn Korsmeyer

Michiel Korthals

Gyorgy Scrinis

Roger Scruton

Kevin W. Sweeney

Paul Thompson

Stellan Welin

"Synopsis" by ,
This book explores food from a philosophical perspective, bringing together sixteen leading philosophers to consider the most basic questions about food: What is it exactly? What should we eat? How do we know it is safe? How should food be distributed? What is good food? David M. Kaplanand#8217;s erudite and informative introduction grounds the discussion, showing how philosophers since Plato have taken up questions about food, diet, agriculture, and animals. However, until recently, few have considered food a standard subject for serious philosophical debate. Each of the essays in this book brings in-depth analysis to many contemporary debates in food studiesand#151;Slow Food, sustainability, food safety, and politicsand#151;and addresses such issues as and#147;happy meat,and#8221; aquaculture, veganism, and table manners. The result is an extraordinary resource that guides readers to think more clearly and responsibly about what we consume and how we provide for ourselves, and illuminates the reasons why we act as we do.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.