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This title in other editions

Other titles in the Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society series:

Antitrust and Global Capitalism, 1930-2004 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society)

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Antitrust and Global Capitalism, 1930-2004 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

By the 1930s, Americans feared that big business exceeded the government's capacity to impose accountability, engendering the most aggressive antitrust campaign in history. Meanwhile, big business had emerged to varying degrees in Britain, Australia, France, Nazi Germany, and militarist Japan. These same nations nonetheless expressly rejected American-style antitrust as unsuited to their cultures and institutions. After World War II, however, governments in these nations, as well as the European Community, adopted workable antitrust regimes. By the millennium, antitrust was instrumental to the clash between state sovereignty and globalization. What ideological and institutional factors explain the global change from opposing to supporting antitrust? Addressing this question, this book throws new light on the struggle over liberal capitalism during the Great Depression and World War II, the postwar Allied occupations of Japan and Germany, the reaction against American big-business hegemony during the Cold War, and the clash over globalization and the WTO.

Synopsis:

Since the Great Depression, Americans sought to impose accountability on U.S. big business through antitrust. During the 1930s, although Britain, France, Australia, Nazi Germany, and militarist Japan controlled big business, they all rejected antitrust. After World War II, however, these same and other nations, as well as the European Community, adopted antitrust. Why? Unlike studies in law, economics, sociology, and politics, which consider antitrust as having secondary influence on American big-business hegemony, this book employs history to reveal how antitrust fostered an international competition consciousness capable of curbing global capitalism.

Synopsis:

This book describes how the international spread of antitrust suggested the historical process shaping global capitalism.

Synopsis:

How antitrust fostered an international competition consciousness, capable of curbing global capitalism.

About the Author

Tony A. Freyer is University Research Professor of History &Law at the University of Alabama. He is the author of many articles and books, including Regulating Big Business: Antitrust in Great Britain and America, 1880-1990 (Cambridge University Press, 1992).

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Reconstituting American Antritrust 1937-945; 2. Protectionism over competition: Europe, Australia, and Japan, 1930-1945; 3. Praxis in America since 1945; 4. Japanese Antitrust since 1945; 5. Antitrust in postwar European social-welfare capitalism; 6. Antitrust resurgence and social-welfare capitalism in postwar Australia; Conclusion.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780521817882
Author:
Freyer, Tony
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Editor:
Tomlins, Christopher
Author:
Freyer, Tony Allan
Author:
Freyer, Tony A.
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
History
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Antitrust
Subject:
Capitalism
Subject:
Antitrust law -- History.
Subject:
Antitrust law -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Capitalism -- Moral and ethical aspects.
Subject:
World History-1650 to Present
Series:
Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society
Publication Date:
20061031
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Pages:
452
Dimensions:
9.24x6.38x1.17 in. 1.63 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
Languages » ESL » General

Antitrust and Global Capitalism, 1930-2004 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) New Hardcover
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$110.50 In Stock
Product details 452 pages Cambridge University Press - English 9780521817882 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Since the Great Depression, Americans sought to impose accountability on U.S. big business through antitrust. During the 1930s, although Britain, France, Australia, Nazi Germany, and militarist Japan controlled big business, they all rejected antitrust. After World War II, however, these same and other nations, as well as the European Community, adopted antitrust. Why? Unlike studies in law, economics, sociology, and politics, which consider antitrust as having secondary influence on American big-business hegemony, this book employs history to reveal how antitrust fostered an international competition consciousness capable of curbing global capitalism.
"Synopsis" by , This book describes how the international spread of antitrust suggested the historical process shaping global capitalism.
"Synopsis" by , How antitrust fostered an international competition consciousness, capable of curbing global capitalism.
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