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Uncle Tom's Cabin

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Uncle Tom's Cabin Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

1. Charles Dudley Warner wrote in an 1896 essay (see Commentary section, above) that "Distinguished as the novel is by its character-drawing and its pathos, I doubt if it would have captivated the world without its humor." What is the role of humor in Uncle Tom's Cabin?

2. Given that the cabin is featured only briefly in the novel, why do you think the book is called Uncle Tom's Cabin?

3. Uncle Tom's Cabin draws on modes, such as the jeremiad,

allegory, and prophecy, that were commonly used by New England writers in the nineteenth century whose literary predecessors were eighteenth-century theologians and preachers (for example, Cotton Mather and Jonathan Edwards). How do these elements function in the novel? What role do the Bible and biblical allusion play (there are at least seventy allusions to, or quotations from, the Bible in the novel)?

4. What is the purpose of the two plots (the story of Uncle Tom, on the one hand, and that of the Harrises, on the other)?

5. What is the significance of the repetition of names (e.g., there are two Toms, two Georges, two Henrys Henrique and Harry])?

6. Ever since the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin, critics have debated whether its sentimentality undermines its abolitionist purpose. James Baldwin, for example, in a famous essay called "Everybody's Protest Novel" (see Commentary section, above), argued that "Uncle Tom's Cabin is a very bad novel, having, in its self-righteous, virtuous sentimentality, much in common with Little Women. Sentimentality, the ostentatious parading of excessive or spurious emotion, is the mark of dishonesty, the inability to feel; the wet eyes of the sentimentalist betray his aversion to experience, his fear of life, his arid heart, and it is always, therefore, the signal of secret and violent inhumanity, the mask of cruelty." Kenneth Lynn, on the other hand, claims that "Uncle Tom's Cabin is the greatest tear-jerker of them all, but it is a tear-jerker with a difference: it did not permit its audience to escape reality. Instead the novel's sentimentalism continually calls attention to the monstrous actuality which existed under the very noses of its readers. Mrs. Stowe aroused emotions not for emotion's sake alone-as the sentimental novelists notoriously did-but in order to facilitate the moral regeneration of an entire nation." Which side do you take in this debate?

7. A related question concerns the artistic merit of the novel, with one side arguing that while Uncle Tom's Cabin was historically and politically significant, it is not a literary masterpiece (owing, among other things, to its sentimentality), and the other side claiming that it is aesthetically valuable (so James Russell Lowell wrote in 1859, "It was so easy to account for the unexampled popularity of 'Uncle Tom' by attributing to it a cheap sympathy with sentimental philanthropy" but, he continues, "we had the advantage of reading that extraordinary book in Europe, long after the whirl of excitement produced by its publication had subsided, and with a judgement undisturbed by those political sympathies which it is impossible, perhaps unwise, to avoid at home. We felt then, and we believe now, that the secret of Mrs. Stowe's power lay in that same genius by which the great successes in creative literature have always been achieved-the genius that instin

Synopsis:

When Eliza discovers that her son is to be sold to another master, she flees the Kentucky plantation where she is held as a slave, while Uncle Tom is sold to Simon Legree, a harsh master who mistreats his slaves, in a new edition of the controversial nineteenth-century American novel. Reissue

Synopsis:

This 1852 novel provides a powerful, historical look at the treatment of slaves in the pre-Civil War South.

About the Author

The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the running torch-bearer created by Lucian Bernhard in 1925 and refurbishing jackets, bindings, and type, as well as inaugurating a new program of selecting titles. The Modern Library continues to provide the world's best books, at the best prices.

From the Hardcover edition.

Table of Contents

In which the reader in introduced to a man of humanity — Mother — Husband and father — Evening in Uncle Tom's cabin — Showing the feelings of living property on changing owners — Discovery — Mother's struggle — Eliza's escape — In which it appears that a senator is but a man — Property is carried off — In which property gets into an improper state of mind — Select incidents of lawful trade — Quaker settlement — Evangeline — Of Tom's new master, and various other matters — Tom's mistress and her opinions — Freeman's defence — Miss Ophelia's experiences and opinions — Miss Ophelia's experiences and opinions, continued — Topsy — Kentucky — "The grass withereth-the flower fadeth" — Henrique — Foreshadowings — Little evangelist — Death — "This is the last of earth" — Reunion — Unprotected — Slave warehouse — Middle passage — Dark places — Cassy — Quadroon's story — Tokens — Emmeline and Cassy — Liberty — Victory — Stratagem — Martyr — Young master — Authentic ghost story — Results — Liberator — Concluding remarks.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780553897692
Publisher:
Bantam
Subject:
Classics
Author:
Stowe, Harriet Beecher
Author:
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Author:
Alfred Kazin
Author:
Kazin, Alfred
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Afro-Americans
Subject:
Fiction-Classics
Subject:
Fiction : Classics
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
American fiction (fictional works by one author)
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
American
Subject:
Novels and novellas
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Afro-Americans -- Southern States -- Fiction.
Subject:
Afro-americans
Subject:
Plantation life
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Political fiction
Subject:
Didactic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Edition Description:
Bantam Classic
Publication Date:
1981
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
544

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Uncle Tom's Cabin
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Product details 544 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780553897692 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , When Eliza discovers that her son is to be sold to another master, she flees the Kentucky plantation where she is held as a slave, while Uncle Tom is sold to Simon Legree, a harsh master who mistreats his slaves, in a new edition of the controversial nineteenth-century American novel. Reissue
"Synopsis" by , This 1852 novel provides a powerful, historical look at the treatment of slaves in the pre-Civil War South.
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