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American Protest Literature (John Harvard Library)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"I like a little rebellion now and then"--so wrote Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Adams, enlisting in a tradition that throughout American history has led writers to rage and reason, prophesy and provoke. This is the first anthology to collect and examine an American literature that holds the nation to its highest ideals, castigating it when it falls short and pointing the way to a better collective future. American Protest Literature presents sources from eleven protest movements--political, social, and cultural--from the Revolution to abolition to gay rights to antiwar protest. Each section reprints documents from the original phase of the movement as well as evidence of its legacy in later times. Informative headnotes place the selections in historical context and draw connections with other writings within the anthology and beyond. Sources include a wide variety of genres--pamphlets, letters, speeches, sermons, legal documents, poems, short stories, photographs, posters--and a range of voices from prophetic to outraged to sorrowful, from U.S. Presidents to the disenfranchised. Together they provide an enlightening and inspiring survey of this most American form of literature.

Synopsis:

I like a little rebellion now and then," wrote Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Adams, enlisting in a tradition that throughout American history has led writers to rage and reason, prophesy and provoke. American Protest Literature presents sources from eleven protest movements--political, social, and cultural--from the Revolution to abolition to gay rights to antiwar protest. In this impressive work, Zoe Trodd provides an enlightening and inspiring survey of this most American form of literature.

About the Author

Zoe Trodd is a member of the Tutorial Board in History and Literature, Harvard University.John Stauffer is Professor of English and American Literature and Language and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.

Table of Contents

  • Foreword [John Stauffer]
  • Introduction
  • 1. Declaring Independence: The American Revolution
    • The Literature
      • “A Political Litany” (1775) [Philip Freneau]
      • From Common Sense (1776) [Tom Paine]
      • From “The Dominion of Providence over the Passions of Men” (1776) [John Witherspoon]
      • The Declaration of Independence (1776)
      • From Letters from an American Farmer (1782) [J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur]
    • The Legacy
      • “The Working Men’s Party Declaration of Independence” (1829) [George Evans]
      • “Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments” (1848)
      • From “Resistance to Civil Government” (1849) [Henry David Thoreau]
      • From “Provisional Constitution” (1858) [John Brown]
      • “Declaration of Interdependence by the Socialist Labor Party” (1895) [Daniel De Leon]
  • 2. Unvanishing the Indian: Native American Rights
    • The Literature
      • Speech to Governor William Harrison at Vincennes (1810) [Tecumseh]
      • “An Indian’s Looking-Glass for the White Man” (1833) [William Apess]
      • “Indian Names” (1834) [Lydia Sigourney]
      • From From the Deep Woods to Civilization (1916) [Charles Eastman]
      • From Black Elk Speaks (1932) [Black Elk and John G. Neihardt]
    • The Legacy
      • From Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (1970) [Dee Brown]
      • “What Is the American Indian Movement?” (1973) [Birgil Kills Straight and Richard LaCourse]
      • “American Indians and Vietnamese” (1973) [Roland Winkler]
      • From Lakota Woman (1990) [Mary Crow Dog]
      • “The Exaggeration of Despair” (1996) [Sherman Alexie]
  • 3. Little Books That Started a Big War: Abolition and Antislavery
    • The Literature
      • From Appeal to the Coloured Citizens (1829) [David Walker]
      • From Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) [Harriet Beecher Stowe]
      • From “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro” (1852) [Frederick Douglass]
      • Prison Letters (1859) [John Brown]
      • From Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) [Harriet Jacobs]
    • The Legacy
      • The Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution (1863, 1865–70)
      • “Solidarity Forever” (1915) [Ralph Chaplin]
      • From “Everybody’s Protest Novel” (1949) [James Baldwin]
      • From The Defiant Ones (1958) [Stanley Kramer]
      • From Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy (1999) [Kevin Bales]
  • 4. This Land Is Herland: Women’s Rights and Suffragism
    • The Literature
      • From “Shall Women Have the Right to Vote?” (1851) [Wendell Phillips]
      • From “Women and Suffrage” (1867) [Lydia Maria Child]
      • From “Declaration and Protest of the Women of the United States” (1876) [National Woman Suffrage Association]
      • “Solitude of Self” (1892) [Elizabeth Cady Stanton]
      • “The Yellow Wallpaper” (1892) [Charlotte Perkins Gilman]
    • The Legacy
      • “Frederick Douglass” (1908) [Mary Church Terrell]
      • From “Why Women Should Vote” (1910) [Jane Addams]
      • From Herland (1915) [Charlotte Perkins Gilman]
      • Nineteenth Amendment and Equal Rights Amendments (1920, 1923, 1943)
      • “Now We Can Begin” (1920) [Crystal Eastman]
  • 5. Capitalism’s Discontents: Socialism and Industry
    • The Literature
      • From Life in the Iron Mills (1861) [Rebecca Harding Davis]
      • From Looking Backward, 2000–1887 (1888) [Edward Bellamy]
      • From How the Other Half Lives (1890) [Jacob Riis]
      • From The Jungle (1906) [Upton Sinclair]
      • “Sadie Pfeifer” and “Making Human Junk” (1908, 1915) [Lewis Hine]
    • The Legacy
      • “The People’s Party Platform” (1892) [Ignatius Donnelly]
      • Food and Drugs Act and Meat Inspection Act (1906)
      • Statement to the Court (1918) [Eugene V. Debs]
      • “Farewell, Capitalist America!” (1929) [William (Big Bill) Haywood]
      • From Nickel and Dimed (2001) [Barbara Ehrenreich]
  • 6. Strange Fruit: Against Lynching
    • The Literature
      • From Southern Horrors (1892) [Ida B. Wells]
      • “Jesus Christ in Texas” (1920) [W.E.B. Du Bois]
      • “The Lynching” (1920) [Claude McKay]
      • “Strange Fruit” (1937, 1939) [Abel Meeropol and Billie Holiday]
      • From “Big Boy Leaves Home” (1936) [Richard Wright]
    • The Legacy
      • “Bill for Negro Rights and the Suppression of Lynching” (1934) [League of Struggle for Negro Rights]
      • “Federal Law Is Imperative” (1947) [Helen Gahagan Douglas]
      • “Take a Stand against the Klan” (1980) [The John Brown Anti-Klan Committee]
      • From “AmeriKKKa 1998: The Lynching of James Byrd” (1998) [Michael Slate]
      • “The Lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith, 1930” (2000)
  • 7. Dust Tracks on the Road: The Great Depression
    • The Literature
      • “Migrant Mother” (1936) [Dorothea Lange]
      • “Farmer and Sons” (1936) [Arthur Rothstein]
      • From The Grapes of Wrath (1939) [John Steinbeck]
      • Hale County, Alabama (1936, 1941) [Walker Evans]
      • From Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941) [James Agee]
    • The Legacy
      • “Tom Joad” (1940) [Woody Guthrie]
      • From 12 Million Black Voices (1941) [Richard Wright and Edwin Rosskam]
      • From The Sweet Flypaper of Life (1955) [Roy DeCarava and Langston Hughes]
      • From The Other America (1962) [Michael Harrington]
      • “Poverty Is a Crime” (1972) [Malik]
  • 8. The Dungeon Shook: Civil Rights and Black Liberation
    • The Literature
      • “Montgomery: Reflections of a Loving Alien” (1956) [Robert Granat]
      • “My Dungeon Shook” (1962) [James Baldwin]
      • From “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (1963) [Martin Luther King, Jr.]
      • “Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.” (1963) [Marion Trikosko]
      • From “The Ballot or the Bullet” (1964) [Malcolm X]
    • The Legacy
      • “On Civil Rights” (1963) [John F. Kennedy]
      • “The American Promise” (1965) [Lyndon B. Johnson]
      • “Black Art” (1966) [Amiri Baraka]
      • “Panther Power” (1989) [Tupac Shakur]
      • “Ten Point Program” (2001) [New Black Panther Party]
  • 9. A Problem That Had No Name: Second-Wave Feminism
    • The Literature
      • “I Stand Here Ironing” (1956) [Tillie Olsen]
      • From The Feminine Mystique (1963) [Betty Friedan]
      • “Statement of Purpose” (1966) [National Organization for Women]
      • “Women’s Liberation Has a Different Meaning for Blacks” (1970) [Renee Ferguson]
      • “For the Equal Rights Amendment” (1972) [Shirley Chisholm]
    • The Legacy
      • Letter to Betty Friedan (1963) [Gerda Lerner]
      • “Poetry Is Not a Luxury” (1977) [Audre Lorde]
      • “The Female and the Silence of a Man” (1989) [June Jordan]
      • From The Morning After (1993) [Katie Roiphe]
      • “Women Don’t Riot” (1998) [Ana Castillo]
  • 10. The Word Is Out: Gay Liberation
    • The Literature
      • From “Howl” (1956) [Allen Ginsberg]
      • Stonewall Documents (1969–1970)
      • From “Refugees from Amerika: A Gay Manifesto” (1969) [Carl Wittman]
      • “The Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements” (1970) [Huey P. Newton]
      • From Street Theater (1982) [Doric Wilson]
    • The Legacy
      • “Read My Lips” (1988) [ACT UP]
      • Still/Here (1994) [Bill T. Jones]
      • From Angels in America (1990, 1991) [Tony Kushner]
      • “Dyke Manifesto” (1993) [Lesbian Avengers]
      • From Stone Butch Blues (1993) [Leslie Feinberg]
      • Goodridge v. Department of Public Health (2003)
  • 11. From Saigon to Baghdad: The Vietnam War and Beyond
    • The Literature
      • “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die-Rag” (1965) [Country Joe and the Fish]
      • “Advent 1966” (1966) [Denise Levertov]
      • From Why Are We in Vietnam? (1967) [Norman Mailer]
      • “Saigon” (1968) [Eddie Adams]
      • “Napalm” (1972) [Nick (Huynh Cong) Ut]
      • From Dispatches (1967–1969, 1977) [Michael Herr]
    • The Legacy
      • “April 30, 1975” (1975) [John Balaban]
      • From “How to Tell a True War Story” (1987) [Tim O’Brien]
      • Poets against the War
        • “Speak Out” (2003) [Lawrence Ferlinghetti]
        • “Poem of War” (2003) [Jim Harrison]
        • “Poem of Disconnected Parts” (2005) [Robert Pinsky]
      • “Who Would Jesus Torture?“ (2004) [Clinton Fein]
      • From Born on the Fourth of July (1976, 2005) [Ron Kovic]
  • Afterword [Howard Zinn]
  • Sources
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674027633
Author:
Trodd, Zoe
Publisher:
Belknap Press
Foreword by:
Stauffer, John
Foreword:
Stauffer, John
Author:
Zinn, Howard
Author:
Stauffer, John
Afterword by:
Zinn, Howard
Afterword:
Zinn, Howard
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
American
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Subject:
LITERARY CRITICISM / Reference
Subject:
History - United States/General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
The John Harvard Library
Series Volume:
99
Publication Date:
April 2008
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 halftones
Pages:
576
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » American » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

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Product details 576 pages Belknap Press - English 9780674027633 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , I like a little rebellion now and then," wrote Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Adams, enlisting in a tradition that throughout American history has led writers to rage and reason, prophesy and provoke. American Protest Literature presents sources from eleven protest movements--political, social, and cultural--from the Revolution to abolition to gay rights to antiwar protest. In this impressive work, Zoe Trodd provides an enlightening and inspiring survey of this most American form of literature.
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