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Les Miserables

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Les Miserables Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Les Miserables is the great epic masterpiece of the mid-nineteenth century. Begun in 1845, the year Louis Philippe conferred a peerage and a lifetime seat in the Senate upon Victor Hugo, it was completed when the author was living in exile in the Channel Islands. Les Miserables is a product as well as a document of the political, social, and religious upheaval that followed the Napoleonic Wars and Europe's great democratic revolutions. The story is centered on Jean Valjean, a peasant who enters the novel a hardened criminal after nineteen years spent in prison for stealing a loaf of bread for the starving children of his sister. The path of Valjean's last twenty-five years, leading from the French provinces to the battlefield of Waterloo and the ramparts of Paris during the Uprising of 1832, introduces us to secret societies of revolutionaries and the vast world of the French lower classes. Jean Valjean's flight from the police agent Javert--the prototype of over a hundred years of fictional detectives--culminates in one of the most famous scenes in all literature, the chase through the sewers of Paris. Les Miserables sold out its large first printing in twenty-four hours and has remained enormously popular. This edition is the classic English translation of Hugo's friend Charles Wilbour, which appeared the same year the novel was published in France.

Synopsis:

After nineteen years in prison, Jean Valjean has difficulty adjusting to the outside world, which scorns and shuns him

Synopsis:

Sensational, dramatic, packed with rich excitement and filled with the sweep and violence of human passions, LES MISERABLES is not only superb adventure but a powerful social document. The story of how the convict Jean-Valjean struggled to escape his past and reaffirm his humanity, in a world brutalized by poverty and ignorance, became the gospel of the poor and the oppressed.

About the Author

Victor-Marie Hugo was born in 1802 at Besanon, where his father, an officer (eventually a general) under Napoleon, was stationed. In his first decade the family moved from post to post: Corsica, Naples, Madrid. After his parents separated in 1812, Hugo lived in Paris with his mother and brothers. His literary ambition--to be Chateaubriand or nothing--was evident from an early age, and by seventeen he had founded a literary magazine with his brother. At twenty he married Adele Foucher and published his first poetry collection, which earned him a small stipend from Louis XVIII. A first novel, Hans of Iceland (1823), won another stipend.

Hugo became friends with Charles Nodier, leader of the Romantics, and with the critic Sainte-Beuve, but rapidly put himself at the forefront of literary trends. His innovative early poetry helped open up the relatively constricted traditions of French versification, and his plays--especially Cromwell, whose preface served as a manifesto of Romanticism, and Hernani, whose premiere was as stormy as that of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring--stirred up much protest for their break with dramatic convention. His literary outpouring between 1826 and 1843 encompassed eight volumes of poetry; four novels, including The Last Day of a Condemned Man (1829) and Notre-Dame de Paris (1831); ten plays (among them Le Roi's Amuse, the source for Verdi's Rigoletto); and a variety of critical writings.

Hugo was elected to the Academie Francaise in 1841. The accidental death two years later of his eldest daughter and her husband devastated him and marked the end of his first literary period. By then politics had become central to his life. Though he was a Royalist in his youth, his views became increasingly liberal after the July revolution of 1830: Freedom in art, freedom in society, there is the double goal.  Following the revolution of 1848, he was elected as a Republican to the National Assembly, where he campaigned for universal suffrage and free education and against the death penalty. He initially supported the political ascent of Louis Napoleon, but turned savagely against him after being denied a role in government following the coup de'tat of 1851.

Hugo went into exile in Brussels and Jersey, launching fierce literary attacks on the Second Empire in The Story of a Crime, Napoleon the Little, and The Punishments. Between 1855 and 1870 he settled in Guernsey in the Channel Islands. There he was joined by his family, some friends, and his mistress Juliette Drouet, whom he had known since 1833, when as a young actress she had starred in his Lucrezia Borgia. His political interests were supplemented by other concerns. From around 1853 he became absorbed in experiments with spiritualism and table tapping. In his later years he wrote The Contemplations (1856), considered the peak of his lyric accomplishment, and a number of more elaborate poetic cycles derived from his theories concerning spirituality and history: the immense The Legend of the Centuries (1859-83) and its post-humously published successors The End of Satan (1886) and God (1891). In these same years he produced the novels Les Miserables (1862), Toilers of the Sea (1866), The Man Who Laughs (1869), and Ninety-Three (1873).

After the fall of the Second Empire in 1870, Hugo returned to France and was reelected to the National Assembly, and then to the Senate. He had become a legendary figure and national icon, a presence so dominating that upon his death Emile Zola is said to have remarked with some relief: 'I thought he was going to bury us all!' Hugo's funeral in 1885 provided the occasion for a grandiose ceremony. His body, after lying in state under the Arch of Triumph, was carried by torchlight--according to his own request, on a pauper's hearse--to be buried in the Pantheon.

Table of Contents

St. Denis. 1. A few pages of history — 2. Eponine — 3. The house in the Rue Plumet — 4. Aid from below may be aid from above — 5. The end of which is unlike the beginning — 6. Little Gavroche — 7. Argot — 8. Enchantments and desolation — 9. Where are they going — 10. June 5th, 1832 — 11. The atom fraternises with the hurricane — 12. Corinth — 13. Marius enters the shadow — 14. The grandeurs of despair — 15. The Rue de l'Homme Arm

Product Details

ISBN:
9780679641551
Publisher:
Modern Library
Subject:
General
Translator:
Wilbour, Charles E.
Translator:
Wilbur, Charles E.
Author:
Hugo, Victor
Author:
Victor, Hugo
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Orphans
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fiction-Classics
Subject:
Drama-General
Subject:
Drama : General
Subject:
Fiction : Classics
Subject:
Continental european fiction (fictional works
Subject:
France
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
France Social life and customs 19th century Fiction.
Subject:
Paris
Subject:
Epic literature
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Paris (france)
Subject:
Ex-convicts
Subject:
Epic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Edition Description:
Modern Library
Publication Date:
19920905
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
1260

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Romance » General

Les Miserables
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Product details 1260 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780679641551 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , After nineteen years in prison, Jean Valjean has difficulty adjusting to the outside world, which scorns and shuns him
"Synopsis" by , Sensational, dramatic, packed with rich excitement and filled with the sweep and violence of human passions, LES MISERABLES is not only superb adventure but a powerful social document. The story of how the convict Jean-Valjean struggled to escape his past and reaffirm his humanity, in a world brutalized by poverty and ignorance, became the gospel of the poor and the oppressed.
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