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Crime and Punishment: A Novel in Six Parts with Epilogue (Vintage Classics)

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Crime and Punishment: A Novel in Six Parts with Epilogue (Vintage Classics) Cover

ISBN13: 9780679734505
ISBN10: 0679734503
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Staff Pick

One of the great classics of world literature, Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment is the story of Raskolnikov, a young man who — unable to complete his studies — commits what he calls "justifiable murder." What ensues is as demanding and illuminating for the reader as it is for the main character. If you're familiar with Dante's Divine Comedy then reading this book is an even more enriching experience.
Recommended by Gin, Powells.com

This is one of the finest explorations of criminal psychology ever written. With enormous scope, Dostoyevsky dissects poverty, rationalization, the criminal mind, guilt, confession, religion, and redemption. He also provides an exquisite look at overwhelming paranoia. Crime and Punishment is a perfect, breathtaking masterpiece.
Recommended by Dianah, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"For my classics year project, I knew I had to get some Dostoevsky in. I crossed The Idiot off the list for the shallow reason that I have the DVD of Akira Kurosawa's version. That left either Crime and Punishment or Brothers Karamazov. A used copy of Crime and Punishment showed up first, so it won. I was a little apprehensive, though, as my mom had recently read another Dostoevsky and found it very Christian, and another person had specifically mentioned Crime and Punishment as a Christian book. However, while Christianity was mentioned, it never rose to a level in the book to cause an atheist to fidget (as opposed to Uncle Tom's Cabin, for example, which I found eye-rollingly unreadable due to sermonizing)." Doug Brown, Powells.com (Read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

It is a murder story, told from a murder;s point of view, that implicates even the most innocent reader in its enormities. It is a cat-and-mouse game between a tormented young killer and a cheerfully implacable detective. It is a preternaturally acute investigation of the forces that impel a man toward sin, suffering, and grace.

Ever since its publication in 1866 Crime and Punishment has intrigued readers and sorely tested translators, the best of whom seemed to capture one facet of Dostoevsky's masterpiece while missing the rest. Now Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky render this elusive and wildly innovative novel with an energy, suppleness, and range of voice that do full justice to the genius of its creator.

Review:

"Reaches as close to Dostoevsky's Russian as is possible in English...the original's force and frightening immediacy is captured....The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation will become the standard English version." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"This fresh, new translation...provides a more exact, idiomatic and contemporary rendition of the novel that brings Fydor Dostoevsky's tale achingly alive....It succeeds beautifully." San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

With the same suppleness, energy, and range of voices that won their translation of The Brothers Karamazov the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, Pevear and Volokhonsky offer a brilliant translation of Dostoevsky's classic novel that presents a clear insight into this astounding psychological thriller. "The best (translation) currently available"--Washington Post Book World.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [553]-564).

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

Lindsay Waite, August 16, 2012 (view all comments by Lindsay Waite)
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I read it in the early 70s and re-read it recently. Before "Criminal Minds" and other current TV shows where there is an attempt to explore the nature of criminality, Dostoyevsky delved into the subject. He takes us in to the mind of Raskolnikov while he contemplates and tries to justify murder. After the killings, he behaves more and more like a guilty man, so when police officer Petrovich and Raskolnikov have encounters, he is a suspect. This is a fascinating psychological and political study of crime and, yes, punishment.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
skpeterson21, May 12, 2011 (view all comments by skpeterson21)
I recently read Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. This novel presents the reader with insight into the mind of a murderer of he plans and executes his crime and suffers as a result. The novel aims to teach the reader the dangers of arrogance and the progressive thinking of 1860s Russia.
This novel was written during a time of political upheaval in Russia. The serfs had just been emancipated and the university students were brimming with ideological protest. Dostoevsky had been jailed previous to the writing of this novel because of his radical writings. He used his jail time experience to help describe Raskolnikov’s experience in Siberia. As a result of this tumultuous time, Dostoevsky injects much social criticism into his novel. He assaults drunkenness, the new “modern” thoughts of the progressives and rationalists. Throughout the book, Dostoevsky calls for a return to the values that had made Russia great.
Dostoevsky presents the reader with many questions throughout the book. He questions the justification and rationalization of murder. Do the ends justify the means? Raskolnikov develops a theory that such men of genius such as him were allowed to transgress the law in the benefit of society. Raskolnikov says that men such as Napoleon (a man of genius) “are made not of flesh but of bronze” (274). Much of the novel is devoted to Raskolnikov’s path to realization about whether or not he is a great man. Another question that arises is regarding the redemption of sin. Is it possible for a man to achieve redemption after committing a heinous crime in the name of vainglory? The reader finds the answer to this question through Raskolnikov’s guilt, suffering, and love for a girl. This girl, Sonya pleads with Raskolnikov to “`accept suffering and redeem yourself by it, that’s what you must do`” (420). By the end of the novel, the reader will find out if Raskolnikov achieves the redemption that he seeks. The prevalence of redemption and sin in this novel is also shown through many Biblical allusions such as to the story of Lazarus.
Dostoevsky’s use of language in this novel is masterful and it fully describes the mental state of a murder. The diction is dark, severe, etc. One such example occurs on page 9 when Raskolnikov thinks about “the sense of infinite loathing that had begun to crush and sicken his heart even while he had only been on his way to the old woman had now attained such dimensions and become so vividly conscious that he was quite simply overwhelmed by his depression” (9). The use of strong language reflects the mental turmoil and anguish that pervades the mind of Raskolnikov. Finally, the diction and language provide a very realistic and believable account of a manic individual as he copes with guilt and shame.
Overall, Crime and Punishment is a wonderful read with many plot twists, boundless symbolism, and questions regarding human nature. The novel reflects the turbulent political and social atmosphere in which it was written and as a result contains striking social commentary. This artistic masterpiece clearly teaches readers a lesson about guilt, sin, arrogance, and the psychology of murder. After reading this novel, I now know why this novel is an international classic.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
skpeterson21, May 12, 2011 (view all comments by skpeterson21)
I recently read Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. This novel presents the reader with insight into the mind of a murderer of he plans and executes his crime and suffers as a result. The novel aims to teach the reader the dangers of arrogance and the progressive thinking of 1860s Russia.
This novel was written during a time of political upheaval in Russia. The serfs had just been emancipated and the university students were brimming with ideological protest. Dostoevsky had been jailed previous to the writing of this novel because of his radical writings. He used his jail time experience to help describe Raskolnikov’s experience in Siberia. As a result of this tumultuous time, Dostoevsky injects much social criticism into his novel. He assaults drunkenness, the new “modern” thoughts of the progressives and rationalists. Throughout the book, Dostoevsky calls for a return to the values that had made Russia great.
Dostoevsky presents the reader with many questions throughout the book. He questions the justification and rationalization of murder. Do the ends justify the means? Raskolnikov develops a theory that such men of genius such as him were allowed to transgress the law in the benefit of society. Raskolnikov says that men such as Napoleon (a man of genius) “are made not of flesh but of bronze” (274). Much of the novel is devoted to Raskolnikov’s path to realization about whether or not he is a great man. Another question that arises is regarding the redemption of sin. Is it possible for a man to achieve redemption after committing a heinous crime in the name of vainglory? The reader finds the answer to this question through Raskolnikov’s guilt, suffering, and love for a girl. This girl, Sonya pleads with Raskolnikov to “`accept suffering and redeem yourself by it, that’s what you must do`” (420). By the end of the novel, the reader will find out if Raskolnikov achieves the redemption that he seeks. The prevalence of redemption and sin in this novel is also shown through many Biblical allusions such as to the story of Lazarus.
Dostoevsky’s use of language in this novel is masterful and it fully describes the mental state of a murder. The diction is dark, severe, etc. One such example occurs on page 9 when Raskolnikov thinks about “the sense of infinite loathing that had begun to crush and sicken his heart even while he had only been on his way to the old woman had now attained such dimensions and become so vividly conscious that he was quite simply overwhelmed by his depression” (9). The use of strong language reflects the mental turmoil and anguish that pervades the mind of Raskolnikov. Finally, the diction and language provide a very realistic and believable account of a manic individual as he copes with guilt and shame.
Overall, Crime and Punishment is a wonderful read with many plot twists, boundless symbolism, and questions regarding human nature. The novel reflects the turbulent political and social atmosphere in which it was written and as a result contains striking social commentary. This artistic masterpiece clearly teaches readers a lesson about guilt, sin, arrogance, and the psychology of murder. After reading this novel, I now know why this novel is an international classic.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 5 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780679734505
Author:
Fyodor Dostoevsky and Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Publisher:
Vintage Books USA
Translator:
Pevear, Richard
Author:
Volokhonsky, Larissa
Author:
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor
Author:
Fyodor Dostoevsky
Author:
Dostoevsky, Fyodor M.
Author:
Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich
Author:
Pevear, Richard
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Novels and novellas
Subject:
Russian & Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Saint petersburg (russia)
Subject:
Detective and mystery stories
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Russia
Subject:
Saint Petersburg (Russia) Fiction.
Subject:
Saint Petersburg
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage Classics
Series Volume:
Volokhonsky Translat
Publication Date:
19930331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
592
Dimensions:
7.9 x 5.2 x 1.2 in 1.16 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Crime and Punishment: A Novel in Six Parts with Epilogue (Vintage Classics) Used Trade Paper
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$12.50 In Stock
Product details 592 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780679734505 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

One of the great classics of world literature, Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment is the story of Raskolnikov, a young man who — unable to complete his studies — commits what he calls "justifiable murder." What ensues is as demanding and illuminating for the reader as it is for the main character. If you're familiar with Dante's Divine Comedy then reading this book is an even more enriching experience.

"Staff Pick" by ,

This is one of the finest explorations of criminal psychology ever written. With enormous scope, Dostoyevsky dissects poverty, rationalization, the criminal mind, guilt, confession, religion, and redemption. He also provides an exquisite look at overwhelming paranoia. Crime and Punishment is a perfect, breathtaking masterpiece.

"Review A Day" by , "For my classics year project, I knew I had to get some Dostoevsky in. I crossed The Idiot off the list for the shallow reason that I have the DVD of Akira Kurosawa's version. That left either Crime and Punishment or Brothers Karamazov. A used copy of Crime and Punishment showed up first, so it won. I was a little apprehensive, though, as my mom had recently read another Dostoevsky and found it very Christian, and another person had specifically mentioned Crime and Punishment as a Christian book. However, while Christianity was mentioned, it never rose to a level in the book to cause an atheist to fidget (as opposed to Uncle Tom's Cabin, for example, which I found eye-rollingly unreadable due to sermonizing)." (Read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "Reaches as close to Dostoevsky's Russian as is possible in English...the original's force and frightening immediacy is captured....The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation will become the standard English version."
"Review" by , "This fresh, new translation...provides a more exact, idiomatic and contemporary rendition of the novel that brings Fydor Dostoevsky's tale achingly alive....It succeeds beautifully."
"Synopsis" by , With the same suppleness, energy, and range of voices that won their translation of The Brothers Karamazov the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, Pevear and Volokhonsky offer a brilliant translation of Dostoevsky's classic novel that presents a clear insight into this astounding psychological thriller. "The best (translation) currently available"--Washington Post Book World.
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